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HEGEMAN

Some descendants of Hendrick Hegeman,
of Flatbush and New Lots,
Kings County, Long Island, New York

Please note: in order to preserve the sustainability of this site as a whole, this page has been placed in an archival state. While corrections of actual errors are still welcomed, new material is no longer being accepted for this page. My apologies to those who have contributed.

Few families have been more badly confused in print than that of Hegeman. The immigrant Adriaen Hegeman,[1] of Midwout (later Flatbush), Schout Fiscal of the three Dutch towns on Long Island,[2] and his wife Catharina Margetts,[3] had seven sons and one daughter. In the succeeding generation, at least six Hegeman grandsons were named Adriaen for him, and at least three were named Joseph after Catharina’s father, Joseph Margetts. Consequently — as for other families such as Bloetgoet, Haff, Kranckheyt, and Lott, which produced large numbers of sons in the first few generations and repeated the same few forenames in diverging branches — the problem of distinguishing cousins of the same name soon presents enormous difficulties.
     With the sole exception of Richard W. Cook’s admirable treatment of Denys2 Hegeman,[4] we have not seen a published account of any of Adriaen’s sons which is free of serious error. The root of all the confusion is the Hegeman entry in Teunis G. Bergen’s Register … of the early settlers of Kings County … (1881), pp. 134-9, which teems with conflations, repetitions and chronological impossibilities, and in which at least three of the heads of families are assigned erroneous parentages. Bergen was followed too credulously by Henry A. Stoutenburgh in his Documentary History of the Dutch Congregation of Oyster Bay (1902), pp. 243-59, who however at least recognized in his account of Joseph2 Hegeman (the only member of the second generation whom he had occasion to treat directly) that he could hardly have been the father of a Peter Hegeman who died in 1770.[5] William A. Eardeley, in his Chronology and Ancestry of Chauncey M. Depew … (1918), added some new material but in ill-digested form; he flauts Stoutenburgh’s correction on p. 189, yet accepts it on p. 191, so that Peter is bifurcated into two different people. The industrious but chaotic Hegeman typescript by the late Laurence La Tourette Driggs (1876-1945) at NYG&BS has furnished some useful particulars, but its author accepted most of Bergen’s assertions without any attempt at analysis, and committed many additional errors which evidently owe their existence to poor note-taking.[6]
     Joseph2 Hegeman, Justice of Kings County, the only one of Adriaen’s seven sons to follow his father into public office, and whose wife’s coveted Rapalje and Trico ancestry has been much publicized in recent years, has predictably been credited with far more children than contemporary records would allow. Bergen and Eardeley each assign him eleven, crowded into a period of about fifteen years! But the 1698 census of Flatbush gives him only four children,[7] so admitting the possibility that his eldest daughter Jannetje had by then married and left her father’s household, there are only four others who verifiably survived infancy. In addition to an alleged Peter, whose probable date of birth (as Stoutenburgh recognized) makes him far too young to have belonged to his family, Joseph has been rather arbitrarily credited with daughters Neeltje (wife of Coert van Voorhees) and Catharina (wife of Teunis Bogaert), who on onomastic grounds were more likely daughters of Isaac2 Hegeman, though this is a question beyond the scope of the present essay. Bergen’s account of Joseph’s son Joseph Jr. on p. 138 is a conflation of at least two and probably three different men of the same name, one of whom was really the son of Hendrick2 Hegeman.
     Furthermore, we can definitely refute one son claimed for Joseph, who, we believe, had not been previously questioned when the present page first appeared; for (contrary to Bergen, Stoutenburgh, Eardeley, and Driggs) this man was not the father of Frans Hegeman (Sr.) of Poughkeepsie, as we feel confident the discussion below will prove. It is scarcely necessary to comment on the absurdity with which this person is multiplied by Bergen and Eardeley into two sons named “Frans” and “Francis.”[8]
     Rather, as we hope to prove, Joseph Hegeman (husband of Sara van der Vliet) and Frans Hegeman belonged to the family of Joseph’s brother Hendrick2 Hegeman, of whose three demonstrable sons only Adriaen3 Hegeman has been correctly described by any of the writers we have mentioned. Hendrick is sorely neglected in the literature, evidently because he has been perceived as a genealogical dead-end. In actuality, he was the progenitor of a flourishing branch of the family, by no means inferior to that of his brother Joseph in interest or extent.
     In fact, in a very recent development (May 2000), another authentic child can now be added to the family of Hendrick Hegeman and Adriaentje Bloetgoet. This is Judicke Hegeman, evidence for whose identity — which had been proposed in an entry in the LDS Ancestral File which we had overlooked — was kindly brought to our attention by Lynn Dielman, of San Diego, California, and is further developed here.
     Because such heavy use is here made of church registers, it would have swelled this essay greatly to have included precise citations in every case. Instead, except for the most important references, or those whose interpretation is open to some doubt, we refer the reader to A Note on the Church Records at the end, listing the editions used. As they are all chronologically arranged or equipt with indexes, their use should present no special difficulty. For abbreviations used in the endnotes, please see Abbreviations used in the Genealogy Homepage of John Blythe Dobson.
     My research on the Hegemans grew out of a suggestion from my grandmother’s cousin, the late Cecelia (Coon) Botting (1905-1994), of Tucson, Arizona, who kindly supplied some starting references and encouragement. I must also record my gratitude to Dorothy A. Koenig, of Berkeley, California, who has (as on several previous occasions) provided discussion of various points and generously supplied materials, and to Harry Macy and Henry B. Hoff, the editor and consulting editor of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, who have furnished valuable comments on sources used in previous writings, from which I continue to benefit. None of these persons, or those whose names follow, should be held responsible for any errors of fact or interpretation. Since this page débuted on the Web,

  • Margaret (Hagerman) Hunter has furnished valuable help with the difficult problem of the Dutchess County Hegemans, and very generously supplied a complete copy of the manuscript Hegeman genealogy by Driggs, mentioned above;
  • Muriel (Albright) Frincke has supplied information on the Parmentier family;
  • Kay Staub, of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, sent an important correction concerning the family of Hendrick4 (Adriaen3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman;
  • Terry Wanamaker supplied information on the Vanderburgh family;
  • Charles M. Cook, of Houma, Louisiana, sent an important correction on the identification of Adriaen3 (Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman;
  • Carol (Roach) Murray, of Surrey, B.C., sent material on the family of Hendrick Lott;
  • Jeff Carr, of Palmyra, Virginia, offered helpful comments on some of the Waldron connections;
  • Candee Scofield Hoff and Roger Ostrom supplied material on the descendants of Elizabeth Ostrom and David Woodruff Candee;
  • Naomi McCabe supplied information on the descendants of John Hegeman and Maria De Graff;
  • Prof. John McLeod corrected a confusion regarding Isaac4 (Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman and Isaac5 (Hendrick4, Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman.


OVERVIEW

Hendrick Hegeman, b. 1649, alive in 1710; m. 1685, Adriaentje Bloetgoet, b. 1660, alive in 1704. Issue:

  1. Adriaen Hegeman, b. 1685, d. 1752; m. 1713, Maria van der Vliet, and had issue.
  2. Frans Hegeman, b. say 1688, alive in 1749; m. 1709, Antjen Rouard, b. 1687, alive in 1743. Issue:
    1. Catharina Hegeman, b. say 1711, alive in 1746, m. by 1737, Joseph Harris, and had issue.
    2. Hendrick Hegeman, b. 1715, alive in 1756; m. by 1743, Catharina De Duytscher; probably m. (2) 1758, Eliza [Taylor?] Vanderburgh; probably m. (3) 1772, Catharina (van Wyck) Ter Boss. Issue:
      1. Francis Hegeman, b. 1743, alive in 1780; m. ca. 1766, Abigail Thorn, and had issue.
      2. (perhaps) Isaac Hegeman, b. say 1745.
      3. (perhaps) Hendrick Hegeman, b. 1752, d. 1811.
      4. Catharina Hegeman, b. 1756.
    3. Isaac Hegeman, b. say 1717, d. 1793-1796; m. 1740, Neeltje De Graef. Issue:
      1. Antjen Hegeman, b. 1741, alive in 1782; m. 1756, Barent De Duytscher, and had issue.
    4. Frans/Francis Hegeman, Jr., b. 1719, d. 1745-1749.
    5. Adriaentje Hegeman, b. say 1720, alive in 1768; m. (1) by 1738, Michiel Parmentier, and had issue; m. (2) 1774, Cornelius Viele.
  3. Joseph Hegeman, b. say 1691, d. 1741; m. 1714 Sara van der Vliet. Issue:
    1. Hendrick Hegeman, b. 1714, d. young.
    2. Adriaentje Hegeman, b. 1716, alive in 1745. She m. by 1741, Hendrick Lott, and had issue.
    3. Jan Hegeman, b. 1716, alive in 1770; m. (1) by 1739, Jannetje ____. He m. (2) ________, and had issue by the first wife at least.
    4. Hendrick Hegeman, b. 1717, d. 1747; m. by 1740, Geertruy Barentse, and had issue, including:
      1. Joseph Hegeman, b. 1740.
      2. Sara Hegeman, b. say 1746, d. 1816; m. Frans P. LeRoy.
    5. Joseph Hegeman, Jr., b. 1719, d. 1741-1770. He m. by 1741, Sara ____, and issue.
    6. Elisabeth Hegeman, b. 1723, alive and unmarried in April 1741, probably m. Zacharias Flagler, Jr., and if so, then had issue.
    7. Sara Hegeman, b. 1725, d. by 1770; m. 1744, William Allen, and had issue.
  4. Catharina Hegeman, b. ca. 1697-8, d. 1757; m. 1716, Jan Aertse van Pelt, and had issue.
  5. Judicke [Hegeman], b. say 1699, alive in 1726; m. before 1720, Gerrit Blom, and had issue.

1.   Hendrick2 Hegeman (Adriaen1),[9] of Flatbush and New Lots (between Flatbush and Brooklyn), son of Adriaen Hegeman and Catharina Margetts, was bapt. (as “Hendricus”) 13 April 1649 in the Oude Kerk, Amsterdam, as a child of Adriaen Hegeman and Sara [sic!] Margers, with sponsor Gualterus Hegeman,[10] and was still alive (at the age of over 79 years) on 12 Oct. 1728 (when he served as a baptismal sponsor), but probably d. by 10 Dec. 1732 (when his wife served alone as a baptismal sponsor where there was no male sponsor present). He m. 26 April 1685 at Flatlands, Kings Co., L.I., “with certificate from Flushing,” by the minister of the Flatbush Dutch Church, Adriaentje Bloetgoet, bapt. 14 Jan. 1660 in the New York Dutch Church, still alive (at the age of nearly 74 years) on 10 Dec. 1732 (when she served as a baptismal sponsor in the Jamaica Dutch Church for a child of Jan and Eliesabet Emons[11]), daughter of Capt. Frans Jans Bloetgoet, of Flushing, by his wife Lysbeth Jans, and stepdaughter of Wouter Gysbertszen/Gysbrechtszen, also of Flushing.[12]
     Although this man was unquestionably a son of the immigrant Adriaen1 Hegeman of Flatbush, we shall state for the sake of completeness that he named a son Adriaen for his father, and served as a baptismal sponsor for children of five of his brothers; namely for Adriaen, son of Joseph Hegeman, bapt. 3 Oct. 1680 in the Brooklyn Dutch Church;[13] for Adriaen, son of Jacobus Hegeman, bapt. 27 July 1684 at New Utrecht;[14] for Catharina, daughter of Benjamin Hegeman, bapt. 12 Feb. 1696 in the New York Dutch Church; for Denys, son of Denys Hegeman, bapt. 29 June 1703 in the Jamaica Dutch Church; and for Jan, son of Abraham Hegeman, bapt. 5 Sept. 1703 in the New York Dutch Church.
     Hendrick’s marriage record says that he was an “unmarried man, from Amsteldam in Holl[and], living under [the jurisdiction of] Midwoud,” and his wife “from New York, living at Flushing,” and the register of marriage fees shows that “Henderrick[u]s Hegeman, bridegroom” was a debtor for the standard amount of 6 guilders.[15] It was apparently soon after that he became a resident of New Lots, between Flatbush and Brooklyn,[16] for his name is included with that of his brother Joseph in the earliest patent of Flatbush, dated in November of the same year.[17] His sons Adriaen, Frans, and Joseph are all said in their marriage records to have been born there. The 1687 Association Test of Flatbush gives the number of his years of residence as 36, which is in close agreement with those given for his two eldest brothers Joseph and Jacob, and accords with the known fact that they were not “natives,” but had been born abroad.[18]
     Hendrick Hegeman joined the Dutch Church of Flatbush at the same time as his mother and his brothers Joseph and Jacob; Bergen gives the year as 1677 but the date is not evident in the only extant part of the membership register in which he is mentioned.[19] Of the surviving rate lists for Flatbush, he first appears in that of 1683, which shows him with 60 acres and 1 poll of land, and 2 horses, on a farm which was probably near that of his mother, since his is listed only two entries away from hers.[20]
     In 1686 “Hendrick and Adriantie Bloedtgoedt” served in the Flatbush Dutch Church as baptismal sponsors for a child of her sister Geertje Bloetgoet, wife of Jan Masten. Hendrick and his brother Jacobus were witnesses to the will of Stoffel Probasco, of Flatbush, dated 29 July 1687.[21] Hendrick and his brother Benjamin witnessed a deed between his brothers Abraham and Denys in 1693.[22] As “Henrikes and Arianetje Hegeman” he and his wife served as baptismal sponsors for a child of Frederick van Leuwen and his wife Dina Jans in the Brooklyn Dutch Church on 9 Dec. 1694, as “Hendrickus and Arriaentie Hegeman” they served as sponsors for a child of Adriaentje’s brother Jan Bloetgoet in the Jamaica Dutch Church in 1703, and as “Hendrickus and Adriaentie Hegeman” they served in the same capacity and in the same place for a child of Steven and Elisabeth [Bloetgoet] Ryder[23] on 27 June 1704.
     A full list of all their known activity as baptismal sponsors is given in a table below. It reveals that almost all of these duties were performed for persons who are known to have been close relatives. Exceptions include Adriantje’s sponsorship of two daughters — both named Adriaentje — of Jan Emons (or Emans), who is revealed by Jamaica deeds to have purchased land adjoining that of Hendrickus Hegeman in 1725, and may simply have become a friend.[24] This man is absent from the account of the Emans family in Bergen’s Kings County, but in 1740 the name of a John Emons is found among the freeholders of Dutchess County, many of whom were Long Islanders.[25] On 3 Aug. 1748 “Ariaantje Emans, young dame, born on Lange Eylandt,” was married in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church to Jacobus Palmatier,[26] and although the child baptized in 1733 would have been only fifteen years old at the time, we are inclined to think they were the same. The wife of Jacobus Palmatier herself baptized five children at Poughkeepsie, but there were no known Hegeman connections among any of the sponsors.
     Because these baptismal sponsorships by Hendrick Hegeman, the last of which was performed when he was over 79 years of age, figure so heavily in our evidence that he was still alive in the 1730s, the reader may wonder whether he has been confused with a younger man of the same name. However, in the preparation of a broader overview of this family, The Hegeman family of New Netherland: a brief outline of the first three generations, no evidence was found to warrant the inference that there was a younger Hendrick Hegeman among this man’s sons or nephews.

The activity of
Hendrick Hegeman & Adriaentje Bloetgoet
as baptismal sponsors

Sponsors Name of child Parents Relationship to parents Place Date
Henderikes Hegeman & Catryna Hegemans Adriaen Joseph Hegeman & Femmitje Remsen Hendrick’s brother Brooklyn (dup. Flatbush) 31 Oct. 1680
Hendricus Hegeman & Lijsbeth Hegeman Adriaan Jacobus Hegeman & Jannetje Ariens Hendrick’s brother New Utrecht (rec. Flatbush) 27 July 1684
Hendrick Hegeman & Adriaentie Bloedtgoedt Trijnte Jan Masten & Geertie Bloedtgoedt Adriaentje’s sister Bushwick (rec. Flatbush; see Fl.Fr. 1:51) 25 May 1686
Coenraedt ten Eyck & Adriaentje Hegemans Adriaen Tobias ten Eyck & Lysbeth Hegeman Adriaentje’s husband’s sister New York 30 Jan. 1690
Hendrikes Hegeman & wife Ariaentje Dina Frederick van Leeuwen & Dina Jans ? Brooklyn 9 Dec. 1694
Henricus Hegemans [sic] & Annetje Jans Catharina Benjamin Hegemans [sic] & Barentje Jans Hendrick’s brother New York 12 Feb. 1696
Hendrickus & Arriaentie Hegeman Elizabeth Jan Bloetgoed & his wife Maria Adriaentje’s brother Jamaica 29 June 1703
Henderikus Hegeman & Aeltie Parael Jan Abraham Hegeman & Geertruy Jans Hendrick’s brother New York 5 Sept. 1703
Hendrickus & Adriaentie Hegeman Maria Steven Ryder & his wife Elizabeth [Bloetgoet] Adriaentje’s sister Jamaica 27 June 1704
Hendricus & Adriaentie Hegeman, Jan Ganoung [blank] Joseph Hedger & his wife Antie ? Jamaica 24 March 1713
Hendricus & Adriaentie Hegeman Adriaentie Joseph Hegeman & his wife Sara Their son Jamaica 1 April 1716
Hendricus Hegeman & Barentie Hegeman Benjamin Adriaen Hegeman & his wife Maria Hendrick’s nephew Jamaica 16 Sept. 1716
Hendricus & Arriaentie Hegeman Hendricus Joseph Hegeman & his wife Sara Their son Jamaica 10 Nov. 1717
Hendrick Hegeman & Geertie Vliet Geertie Adriaen ten Eyck & his wife Rebecca Hendrick’s nephew Jamaica 25 May 1718
Hendricus Hegeman & Adriaantje his wife Adriaantje Jan van Pelt & his wife Catryna Their daughter New Utrecht 17 Jan. 1720
Hendrikus Hegeman & Femmetie Blom [i.e. Femmetje, wife of Barent Blom] Femmetie Gerret Blom & his wife Judicke Hendrick’s daughter Jamaica 27 Aug. 1721
Baarent Blom & Areaentie [sic] Hegeman Areaentie Garret Blom & his wife Judeke Adriaentje’s daughter Jamaica 8 May 1724
Henderiches Heegeman & Barentie Heegeman Benjeman Jan Heegeman [son of Benjamin] & his wife Marytie Hendrick’s nephew Jamaica 12 Oct. 1728
Areaentie Hegeman Areantie Johannes Emous [recte Emons] & his wife Elisabet ? Jamaica 10 Dec. 1732
Areaentie Hegeman Araentie [sic] Jan Emons & his wife Eliesabet ? Jamaica 2 Dec. 1733

     On 7 Nov. 1691 “Hendrick[u]s Hagoman living in the new lottes bellonging to Flattbush” purchased 150 acres of land west of Jamaica, Queens Co., L.I., from William Whitte “for a vallewable sume of money.”[27] On 8 Sept. 1696 he was chosen collector for Jamaica,[28] and on 1 Jan. 1693/4 he pledged 10 shillings toward the upkeep of the minister.[29] He purchased meadowland from William Creed on 27 Jan. 1701/2,[30] and five acres of land from Peter White and Samuel Denton for £22 on 12 March 1710.[31] His land is referred to considerably later in Jamaica deeds of 1725 and 1728, and he was still alive on 12 Oct. 1728, when he served as a baptismal sponsors in the Jamaica Dutch Church.[32] According to Bergen, Hendrick was one of the purchasers of the Harlington tract in Somerset Co., N.J., about 1710. We know that he could sign his name, because as “Hendrickes Hegoman,” “Hendrickes Heagoman,” or “Hendrickes Heagoeman” he attests to Jamaica deeds of 1695, 1699, and 1700.[33] While these spellings may seem farfetched, they are not so extreme as a 1704 document in someone else calls him “Henrycos Heiggaman.”[34] Nevertheless, it is clear he did not possess anything like the education his father had enjoyed.
     As all of these records place Hendrick Hegeman more or less continuously on Long Island, the record of a sale by him of “lands in Midwout” to Theodorus van Wyck on 14 April 1694, calling him “of New Sjemeken,”[35] must probably be taken as an outlandish spelling of Jamaica. We had formerly considered whether it might represent Shamokin (now Sunbury), Pennsylvania, but that place does not seem to have been settled by Europeans at so early a date. Residence at Jamaica would alone be sufficient to explain his absence from the census of the Dutch towns taken about 1698 (which lists all six of his brothers),[36] as well as our failure to discover baptismal records for more of his children, since the baptismal registers of the Dutch Church of Jamaica before 1702 are all lost.
     The account given by Bergen of this man’s childen is highly problematic. Aside from the issue we regard as proven (namely Adriaen and Catharina, of whom below), he includes, without citing any record evidence:

  1. Joost.[37] We suspect Bergen included him because a Joost Hegeman served as baptismal sponsor to Hendrick Hegeman’s son Adriaen in 1686. The name is corroborated by the appearance of a“Joost Hageman” as a witness to the 1695 will of Margaret van Varick of Flatbush.[38] But he was surely too old to have been a son of Hendrick’s wife Adriaentje Bloetgoet, who was nearly 11 years her husband’s junior. Thus, since his father had never been previously married, for Joost to belong here he would have to have been illegitimate, a subject upon which relevant records are silent and a possibility we consider distinctly unlikely. Joost was doubtless none other than Joseph Hegeman, born 1651, the eldest of Hendrick’s younger brothers, and (we daresay) a rather obvious candidate to serve as baptismal sponsor to Hendrick’s child. Is it possible Bergen failed to recognize Joost as a nickname for Joseph? Driggs unfortunately lent credence to Bergen’s claim by stating, inexplicably, that “Joost Hegeman, s[on] of Hendrickus and Arientje (Bloodgood) Hegeman was baptized 1688 at Flatbush Church.” No child whatsoever named Joost or Joseph was baptized at Flatbush in that year.
  2. Jacobus.[39] Driggs embellished Bergen’s account by claiming that this child was “baptised 1690 at Flatbush church by [its] parents,” but the church register shows no such baptism. He then attempts to connect this child with a Jacobus Hegeman of Cow Neck, but if the names of the four children attributed to this man are authentic, they are decidedly not in accord with the supposition that he was a son of Hendrick Hegeman and Adriaentje Bloetgoet.
  3. Phebe. Driggs supplies her with a birthdate of 1693, which surely has no documentary basis.

As nothing further is said of Jacobus or Phebe by Bergen, it is impossible to speculate as to what motivated Bergen to include their names in this list.
     Here, then, is our revised list of the known issue of Hendrick Hegeman and Adriaentje Bloetgoet (order partly inferential):

  1. 2Adriaen Hegeman, b. at New Lots (according to his marriage record), bapt. 14 March 1686 in the New York Dutch Church with sponsors Joost Hegeman, Jacobus Hegeman (the father’s brother), Femmetje Rems (the latter’s wife).
  2. 3Frans Hegeman, b. say 1688, at Oostwoudt (i.e. New Lots).
  3. 4Joseph Hegeman, b. say 1691 at New Lots (according to his marriage record).
  4. 5Catharina Hegeman, b. ca. 1697-8.
  5. 6Judicke [Hegeman], b. say 1699.

2.   Adriaen3 Hegeman (Hendrick2, Adriaen1),[40] of Jamaica, L.I., of Harlingen, Somerset Co., N.J., and possibly also of Pennsylvania, was b. at New Lots (according to his marriage record), bapt. 14 March 1686 in the New York Dutch Church, d. between 8 Aug. 1754 (when he made his will) and 27 July 1762 (when it was proved). He (then of Jamaica) m. 1 May 1713 in the Flatbush Dutch Church, Maria van der Vliet, “born and residing on the New Lots,” living 1740, probably a daughter of Jan Dirckse van der Vliet, of Flatbush, and afterward of Six Mile Run, Somerset Co., N.J., by his wife Geertje ver Kerk, and thus a sister of the Sara van der Vliet who married Adriaen’s brother, Joseph Hegeman (no. 4).[41] Her identity is corroborated by the 1722 will of “John Vliet, of Six Mile Run, yeoman,” which mentions wife Geertie and daughter “Maria, wife of ADrian Hageman,” and by the 1744 will of “Geertie Fleet, of Six Mile Run, relict of John Fleet, late of said place,” which mentions “daughter Maritie, wife of Adrian Hageman, of same place, yeoman.”
     The connection of the Adriaen Hegeman of the 1686 baptism with the husband of Maria van der Vliet is indicated by the naming of his eldest son Hendrick, after his father, with his parents serving as baptismal sponsors for the child. After baptizing a child at Jamaica in 1714, it would appear that he left there shortly after. In earlier versions of the present notes, we had contended, following Bergen, that he later went to Hempstead, L.I., and was the one of this name who made a will dated 25 April 1752.[42] We now recognize that we had failed to analyze the evidence correctly, and that this testator was actually the son of Benjamin2 Hegeman.[43] The fact that the two men both had wives named Marritje and were baptizing children at Jamaica almost simultaneously makes them exceedingly difficult to distinguish from one another, as the register kept during this period does not record the maiden surnames of the mothers. Indeed, the fact that the name Adriaen was borne by so many descendants of the original Adriaen Hegeman presents acute problems of identification, which have been recklessly disregarded in many secondary accounts.[44]
     In reality the present subject went to the Harlingen tract in New Jersey, where he baptized a child in 1731. He was correctly identified so long ago as 1916, in a good article on the early settlement of the area, which reads, in part:

Adrian Hagaman married Maria, a daughter of John Vleet, whose lands joined his on the north, purchased land and built a house where John Garretson resides, lying on the Somerset side of the Old Path, being a part of No. 7, of the Long Island tract. In 1745 he was assessed for 350 acres of land, 23 cattle and 15 sheep, amounting to 18s., 2d. …. In his lifetime he made advances to his children in lands and money, and so arranged it in his will that any of them owing the estate on bond might pay the principal at pleasure, paying the interest, and when the interest paid by any of them amounted to the sum of the principal, then the bond to be void. He died and was buried about three hundred yards west of his dwelling, along the line between his and the old Stryker property, where his wife Mary and others of the family were also buried.”[45]

Finally, if he did not ever actually live in Pennsylvania, he at least made visits there, for “Adriaen Hegeman & Maria van Vliet” served as sponsors to their son Hendrick’s daughter Maria, bapt. 7 April 1740 in the Dutch Church of Churchville, Northampton Tp., Bucks Co., Pa. (later known as the “Reformed Dutch Church of North and Southampton”), and Adrian Hegeman served as sponsor to Hendrick’s third daughter, Catryntje, baptized 24 Mar. 1745 in the same church, and to Adrian, son of Gerret Wynkoop and Susanna Vliedt, who was bapt. 25 May 1746 in the same church. However, it is conceivable that this services were performed by proxy, despite the lack of such an indication in the records.
     The will, dated 8 Aug. 1754 but not proved until 27 July 1762, of “Adrian Hagerman, of Somerset County,” leaves £30 yearly to wife Mary, leaves to sons Simon and Benjamin “the plantation where I live, of 350 acres,” and mentions sons Hendrick, John, Adrian, Joseph, Simon, Jacobus, and Benjamin, and daughters Geertje (wife of John Manley), Mary (wife of Adrian Hageman), and Catherine (wife of Samuel Waldron).[46]
     Issue (sons then daughters, per will):[47]

  1. Hendrick Hegeman, of Hempstead, of Churchville, Northampton Tp., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania, and of Harlingen, N.J., bapt. 24 March 1714 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, with sponsors Hendrickus and Arriaentie Hegaman,[48] living 1754. He m. before 1738, Catharina van Horn, b. 13 April 1719, d. 7 Sept. 1783, sister of his brother Jan’s wife, and a daughter of Christian van Horn, of Northampton Co., Pa., member for Bucks Co. in the Pennsylvania Assembly, by the latter’s wife Willemtje van Dyck.[49] By 1738 they were in Northampton Tp., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania, where the first four of their known children were baptized, his parents serving as baptismal sponsors to his second child.[50] They then had three children baptized in Harlingen, Somerset Co., New Jersey, followed by two more baptized in Bedminster Tp., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. It should not be too readily concluded that all the later Hegemans of Bucks County are descended from them, for there are indications that the first settlers there of this surname were not all closely related to one another.
         Known issue, first four baptized in the Dutch Church of Churchville, Northampton Tp., Bucks Co., Pennsylvania (later known as the “Reformed Dutch Church of North and Southampton”):[51]
    1. Adriaen Hegeman, bapt. 26 March 1738 as a child of “Henricus Hegerman & Tryntje van Hoorn,” with sponsors “Barent van Hoorn, Junior, and Willempje Vandyck.” The baptism of this child also appears, for some reason, in the records of the Dutch Church at Bensalem, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, where the names of the parents are given as “Henderikes Hegeman & Tryntie van Hooren,” and those of the sponsors as “Barent van Hooren, Junior, and his mother Wellepye Vandyck.”[52]
    2. Maria Hegeman, bapt. 7 April 1740 as a child of Hendrick Hegeman & Catharina van Hoorn, with sponsors Adriaen Hegeman & Maria van Vliet. She d. 28 March 1783 “in the 44th year of her age.” She m. (1) 26 Oct. 1758 in the Tohickon Union Reformed Church, Bedminister Tp., Bucks Co., Hadrian Schwartz, who d. by 1768. She m. (2) 13 Sept. 1768 in the Dutch Church of Churchville, David Feaster, b. about March-April 1739, d. 30 Sept. 1808, “aged 69 years, 6 months,” probably a son of John Feaster (ca. 1709-1775) and his wife Rachel (ca. 1707-1774), who are buried in the same cemetery as David Feaster and his wife, namely the Feaster and Hagaman Burying Ground, Middle Holland Road, Holland, Northampton Tp., Bucks Co.[53] Maria Hegeman had only two known children by her first husband. All her children by her second husband, David Feaster, were baptized at Churchville (no sponsors being named in any of the records):

      (by first husband:)

      1. Jacobus Schwartz, bapt. 21 Oct. 1759 in the Church: Records of Tohickon Union Reformed Church, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, as a son of Hadrian & Maria Schwartz, with sponsor Barbara Schwartz.
      2. Jan/Antje [Schwartz] (name unclear), bapt. 9 July 1769 at Churchville, called in the record “a previous child of Maria Hegeman.”

      (by second husband:)

      1. Jannetje Feaster, bapt. 25 Dec. 1770.
      2. Aaron Feaster, 22 Nov. 1772.
      3. David Feaster, Jr., bapt. 12 Feb. 1775; d. 4 March 1776, d. 4 March 1776, “in the 2nd year of his age,” and buried in the same cemetery as his parents.
      4. Rachel Feaster, bapt. 8 Dec. 1776.
      5. Benjamin Feaster, bapt. 28 May 1778.
      6. ____ Feaster (name left blank in record), bapt. 13 Feb. 1780.
    3. Jannetje Hegeman, bapt. 6 June 1742 as a child of Henricus Hegeman & Catryntje van Hoorn, no sponsors being named in the record. We have not discovered a marriage for this child.
    4. Catryntje Hegeman, b. 17 March 1745 (according to the Van Horn genealogy), bapt. 24 March 1745 as a child of Hendrick Heegeman & Cattrintie van Horn, with sponsor Adriaen Heegeman. She was possibly the one of this name who m. by 1778 (the marriage register for Churchville has a gap for the years 1772-1788), Cornelius Corsen, and had the following children, bapt. at Churchville (no sponsors being named in either of the records): ____ (name illegible), 14 June 1778; Caty, 22 Oct. 1780.
    5. Geertje Hegeman, bapt. 24 May 1747 at Harlingen, Somerset Co., New Jersey, as a child of “Hendricus Hegeman & Catrina van Hoorn.”
    6. Willemtje Hegeman, bapt. 23 Aug. 1749 at Harlingen.
    7. Antje Hegeman, bapt. 20 April 1754 at Harlingen.
    8. John Hegeman, b. 20 Dec. 1756, bapt. 2 July 1758 in the Tohickon Union Reformed Church, Bedminister Tp., Bucks Co., as a son of Henry and Catharine Hegeman, no sponsors being named in the record.
    9. Barnet Hegeman, b. 14 March 1760, bapt. 20 Aug. following in the Tohickon Union Reformed Church aforesaid, as a son of Henry and Catharine Hegeman, no sponsors being named in the record. It will be noted that he and his first cousin Barnet Hegeman, the son of his uncle Jan, were almost exactly the same age. Various secondary sources credit each with a wife Isabel van Horn. We have tentatively assigned her to the other Barnet, on onomastic grounds, but the matter cannot be considered positively settled.
  2. Jan Hegeman (John Hagerman), “born on the Raritan” (according to his marriage record), bapt. Aug. 1717 at New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., N.J.,[54] living 1754. He m. 20 Oct. 1741 in the Churchville Dutch Church, Jannetje Van Horn, b. 20 May 1721 in Bucks Co., d. 7 Sept. 1783, sister of his brother Hendrick’s wife, and a daughter of Christian van Horn, of Northampton Co., Pa., member for Bucks Co. in the Pennsylvania Assembly, by his wife Willemtje van Dyck.[55] This couple did not baptize any children at Churchville, but Davis’s Bucks County (perhaps following some family bible record) lists the following issue for them:
    1. Mary Hagerman, b. 8 March 1743.
    2. Christian Hegeman/Hagerman, b. 8 Aug. 1745. It seems likely he was the Christiaen Hegeman who with wife Geertje baptized a son Jan on 12 Nov. 1769 in the Churchville Dutch Church.
    3. Henry Hagerman, b. 5 Jan. 1748, d. young.
    4. Jan/John Hagerman, Jr., b. 26 July 1750.
    5. Henry Hagerman, b. 11 Jan. 1753. A secondary source states that he d. 1791, having m. Rebecca Searle.[56] A Henderick Hegeman, with an unnamed wife, bapt. a child Jan or Jannetje (name illegible) on 30 June 1776 in the Churchville Dutch Church.
    6. Benjamin Hagerman, b. 19 Nov. 1755.
    7. Adrian Hagerman, b. 16 Sept. 1758.
    8. Barnet Hagerman, b. 23 Feb. 1761. As noted above, he had a first cousin, Barnet Hegeman, son of his uncle Hendrick, who was almost exactly the same age, and various secondary sources credit each with a wife Isabel van Horn. Considering the names of the children, we feel that, pendingthe discovery of further evidence, those who make Isabel’s husband the present Barnet would seem to have the better claim. If this assumption is correct, then he d. 1832 in Wayne Co., Ohio,[57] having m. before 1781, Isabel van Horn, a daughter of Barnet van Horn and Sara van Pelt,[58] and had issue:[59]
      1. John Hagerman, b. 25 Feb. 1781 in Bucks Co., d. ca. 1847-48 in Carroll Co., Ohio. He m. before 1780, Maria de Graff, said to have been a daughter of Michael De Graff and Margaretha Creij, of Mt. Pleasant, York Co., Pennsylvania. According to Naomi McCabe, about 1817 they moved to Fayette County, Pa., and lived there until 1827, when the went to Jefferson County, Ohio. Issue:[60]
        1. Elizabeth Hagaman, b. 1800 (not 1817 as sometimes stated), d. 1865, and buried with her husband in Amsterdam Presbyterian Churchyard, Jefferson County. She m. by 1822, Nathaniel Fields, d. 1853. According to their descendant Naomi McCabe, the went to Carroll County, Ohio, in 1842. They had nine children.
        2. Michael Hagaman, shoemaker, b. 18 July 1800 [1801?] in Adams Co., Pa., d. 21 April 1868 in Hillsdale Co., Michigan, and buried in the Hagaman Cemetery, Amboy Tp., Hillsdale Co., Michigan. He m. Sarah Cope, and had issue.
        3. George Hagaman, b. 1 Sept. 1802 at Gettysburg, Adams Co., Pa., d. 28 Aug. 1870. He m. Nancy Lucas, and had issue.
        4. John Hagaman Jr., b. 30 Aug. 1805 near Gettysburg, d. 17 Jan. 1892 at Chesapeake, Ohio, and buried in the Union Cemetery, Chesapeake. He may have m. ____ Fields.
        5. Jackson Hagaman, b. 1807.
        6. Jesse Hagaman, b. 1809.
        7. James Hagaman, b. 27 Feb. 1813, d. (unmarried?) 7 March 1870.
        8. David Hagaman, b. 1815.
        9. Amos Hagaman, b. 5 April 1820 in Fayette Co., Pa., d. 6 Jan. 1854. He m. Elizabeth Sell, and had issue.
      2. (? not in 1929 Van Horn genealogy) William H. Hageman, b. 15 May 1783 in Bucks Co., d. 29 Dec 1852 in Wayne Co., Ohio.
      3. Margariet Hagerman, b. 21 May 1785.
      4. Jane Hagerman (twin), b. 13 April 1789.
      5. Jesse Hagerman (twin), b. 13 April 1789.
    9. Jane Hagerman, b. 15 May 1765.
  3. Adriaen Hegeman (Jr.), alive in 1754. Men named Adriaen Hegeman with wives Catalyntje ____ (1749) and Sara ____ (1751, 1754) baptized children at Harlingen. Whether these two men were the same we cannot say, but for what it is worth, here is a list of the children in question:
    1. Aeltje Hegeman, bapt. 23 Aug. 1749.
    2. Adriaen Hegeman, bapt. 18 Nov. 1751.
    3. Antje Hegeman, bapt. 8 Oct. 1754.
  4. Joseph Hegeman, alive in 1754. Driggs says he was the one who m. Niesje Waldron, who seems likely to have been identical with the Agnietje Waldron, bapt. 18 May 1737, daughter of Frans/Francis Waldron, of Harlem and of Somerset Co., New Jersey, by the latter’s wife Catherine, although Riker shows no spouse for this Agnietje.[61] If true, they had the following child, baptized in Readington Dutch Church:[62]
    1. Maria Hegeman, bapt. 27 Nov. 1755.
  5. Simon Hegeman, said to have been b. 1727 and to have d. in 1793.[63] He inherited part of his father’s land, and the 1916 article cited above says of him: “In 1766, Simon Hagaman, the son of Adrian, lived in a house built on his half of the old tract on the site now occupied by Henry P. Cortelyou.” He m. by 1753, Aeltje ____. Known issue, all baptized at Six Mile Run, N.J.:[64]
    1. Geertje Hegeman, bapt. 30 Dec. 1753, d. by 1765, when another daughter was given the same name.
    2. Adriaen Hegeman, bapt. 23 Feb. 1755.
    3. Maria Hegeman, bapt. 5 Dec. 1756.
    4. Simon Hegeman, bapt. 4 Dec. 1763.
    5. Geertje Hegeman, bapt. 10 Nov. 1765.
    6. Elizabeth Hegeman, bapt. 3 June 1769.
    7. Aeltje Hegeman, bapt. 16 Aug. 1773.
  6. Jacobus Hegeman, bapt. 24 Jan. 1728 at Harlingen, as a son of “Adriaen Hegeman and Marietje Vliet,” living 1754. Driggs says he had wife Elizabeth.
  7. Benjamin Hegeman, of Six Mile Run, N.J., bapt. 21 March 1731 at Harlingen, as a son of “Arron [Hegeman] and Maria Vleet,” d. 1804. He inherited part of his father’s land, and m. by 1757, Geertje ____, who d. 6 Feb. 1777 “in her forty-first year,”[65] and (2) in 1777-79, Sara ____, alive in 1781. Known issue, all baptisms at Six Mile Run,[66] with many additional details from the 1916 article cited above:

    (by first wife:)

    1. Adriaen Hegeman, bapt. April 1757, who spent all his life at Six Mile Run. He m. Frances Wyckoff.
    2. Annatje Hegeman, bapt. 25 Nov. 1759; probably did not live to adulthood.
    3. Benjamin Hegeman, bapt. 12 Sept. 1762. He m. Lena Garretson, of Middlebush.
    4. Pieter Hegeman, bapt. 16 Dec. 1764; he lived on and owned the parental homestead, but died at Dayton, Ohio. He m. Nancy Suydam, and had three children:
      1. Sarah Hegeman, who d. unmarried.
      2. Cornelius Hegeman, d. young.
      3. Benjamin Hegeman, “who moved to Dayton, Ohio, and married there; he was Captain of a Rifle Company raised in Franklin township and a brave military officer. He was afterwards appointed Major of Second Battalion, Third Regiment of Somerset Brigade, commanded by Col. Barcalow.”
    5. Maria Hegeman, bapt. 12 April 1767. She m. Jacob Skillman.
    6. Geertje Hegeman, bapt. 26 March 1769, d. by 1781, when another daughter was given the same name.
    7. Jannetje Hegeman, bapt. 14 Oct. 1770. She m. Cornelius Waldron.
    8. Jan Hegeman, bapt. 19 July 1772; probably did not live to adulthood.
    9. Symon Hegeman, bapt. 7 Nov. 1773. He m. Ida suydam, and moved to Ohio.
    10. William Hegeman, bapt. 16 May 1776, who spent all his life at Three-Mile Run. He had three wives.

    (by second wife:)

    1. Isaac Hegeman, of Harlingen, bapt. 28 Nov. 1779, d. in Illinois. He m. Maria Vanderveer.
    2. Geertje Hegeman, b. 6 Nov. 1781, bapt. 9 Dec. following, d. 11 April 1859 at Ovid, Seneca Co., N.Y. She m. 11 Dec. 1798, John P. Nevius, b. 4 Nov. 1774 at Pleasant Plains, near Six Mile Run, d. 8 Aug. 1846 at or near Ovid aforesaid, having sold his farm in Franklin Tp., N.J., and removed to Ovid in 1817. He was a son of Peter P. Nevius, of Six Mile Run, and Jane Stoothoff. There is an extensive account of this couple, who had eleven children, in the 1900 Nevius genealogy, pp. 418-20. Among their issue was Benjamin Hageman Nevius, father of John Livingston Nevius (1829-1893), the emininent missionary.
  8. Geertje Hegeman, living 1754; m. John Manley.
  9. Mary Hegeman, living 1754-57; m. Adrian Hageman, whom Driggs identifies (whether correctly or not we cannot say) as Adriaen4 (Dennis3, Dennis2, Adriaen1) Hegeman. They were perhaps the Adrian Hegeman and wife Marya who bapt. the following child at Harlingen:
    1. Maria Hegeman, bapt. 12 Aug. 1757.
  10. Catherine Hegeman, living 1754, m. by 1753, Samuel Waldron. Considering that they named a son Frans, it seems likely that he was the Samuel Waldron, b. 3 March 1729, son of Frans/Francis Waldron, of Harlem and of Somerset Co., New Jersey, by the latter’s wife Catherine; however, Riker, identifies the wife of this Samuel as Gertrude Van Ness, and we are not able to resolve the matter.[67] Known issue, both baptized in the Readington Dutch Church:[68]
    1. Adriaen Waldron, bapt. 7 Oct. 1753.
    2. Frans Waldron, bapt. 27 Nov. 1775. He was possibly the Francis Waldron who m. Jane Sutphen, and baptized three children at Neshanic.[69]

3.   Frans3 Hegeman (Hendrick2, Adraen1),[70] of Flatbush, L.I., and Poughkeepsie, was b. say 1688 at Oostwoudt (i.e. New Lots), L.I., and living 1749. He was betrothed 29 Oct. 1709 in the Flatbush Dutch Church, to Antjen Ruwaert, b. 1 Jan. 1687,[71] living 1743, daughter of Hendrick Ruwaert or Rouard, apparently of Flatbush, by his wife Catharina Vonck, and step-daughter of Col. Henry Filkin, of Brooklyn and Flatbush.[72]
     As noted above, Bergen, Stoutenburgh, Eardeley, and Driggs all make Frans Hegeman a son of Joseph2 Hegeman and Femmetje Rems van der Beeck. His wife’s step-father, Henry Filkin, had had a long and intimate association with Joseph Hegeman as a fellow justice in the county,[73] and it was evidently assumed that Antjen had married the son of her father’s old friend. But Long Island is a small place, and such assumptions are perilous. Despite the fact that the identification was accepted by so eminent a writer as W.K. Griffin, in his widely-cited article on the Dutcher family,[74] we were troubled by the lack of onomastic evidence for such an affiliation, and eventually were able to find evidence disproving it. For when in 1715 Frans baptized his eldest son Hendrick at Jamaica, the sponsors were Hendrick Hegeman and his wife Adriaentje Bloetgoet. Recalling that Adriaentje’s father was a Frans, we suddenly see the explanation not only of Frans Hegeman’s own name, but of the fact that nearly every documented Frans or Francis Hegeman before the late 18th century can be shown to have been a direct descendant of his.[75] The rather uncommon name of Frans was practically unique to this branch of the Hegeman family because it had been brought in by marriage with a Bloetgoet. The old rule that a younger son (usually the second) in a family should be named for the mother’s father was followed so assiduously in some lines that the name Francis persisted in female descendants of this family through to the late nineteenth century at least.[76]
     Frans Hegeman and his wife went by 1725 to Dutchess County with three of her Filkin half-brothers, the founders of Filkintown, Washington Precinct, whose father had been one of the original patentees of the Nine Partners tract.[77] There in Dutchess County Frans Hegeman purchased from Filkin’s widow 300 acres of land in the second water lot on the Hudson, at the place which came to be known as Hegeman’s Landing.[78] The historian Helen Reynolds places the Landing “near the present [1940] property of the Novitiate of St. Andrew,” and infers that Frans Hegeman “probably lived on a farm east of the post road.”[79] Intriguingly, an early map of the patent seems to show the name of a “Willm. Ruard,”[80] of whom no further trace has been found.[81] Antje Rouard’s half-brother Justice Francis Filkin, who operated a general store at Poughkeepsie, and occasionally mentions customers paying off their accounts “through” Frans Hegeman in the 1740s, took a keen personal interest in transactions involving his family’s lands, and copied or made memoranda of a number of documents relating thereto into his account book.[82] The most pertinent of these entries, which is unfortunately somewhat enigmatic, reads:

April 10 1746 — My mother [the widow Catharina Filkin] and Francis Hegeman and Antie his wife, Isaac Filkin, Jacob Filkin, Court v[an] Vorheest and Cathrina his wife, have given one deed to me Francis, and Henry Filkin, for the despute lands of the Nine Partners besid[e]s Pogakepsi; that is to say, the land in desput at the h[e]ad of the Fishkills and also the lands between us and Be[e]ckman’s Line, and also between the Fishkills and the market trees [i.e. marquetries?] of paling [i.e. fencing?] in Compeny.[83]

We must confess that the interpretation of the last sentence defeats us. It is even possible that the last three words should mean “Pauling and Company,” the Paulings being a well-known family in the area. The wife of Coert van Voorhees (of Fishkill) was Catharina Filkin, sister of the other Filkins mentioned in the document.[84]
     Frans Hegeman appears frequently in the public records, being listed as a tax-payer in the Middle Ward of Nine Partners Precinct in 1725 through 1738.[85] As “Franse Hegeman” he was assessed for £10 3s. 6d. in a tax list, dated 25 Jan. 1726/7, of “all the real and personall estates of all the freeholders, inhabitants, residents, and sojourners of the Midle ward of the County of Dutchess,” on 23 Jan. 1727/8, he was assessed for £11 2s. 9d., and on 4 Jan. 1728/9 he was assessed for £9 2s. 3d.[86] On 2 April 1728 he was elected Constable and Collector for the South Ward, on 7 April 1730 he was chosen as one of two surveyors of highways, and on 4 April 1732 he was chosen Spervisor of the Middle Ward.[87] He was appointed Assessor for Crum Elbow Precinct in 1738, 1739, 1740, and 1741.[88] He also appears in the 1740 list of freeholders.[89] He is presumably the “Justice Hegeman” who was appointed one of the Overseers of Highways in 1743,[90] and the “Mr. Hegeman, justice of the peace in Filkentown” who on 1 March 1744 made a visitation of the community of Moravian Brethren at Shekomeko to enquire into the truth of rumors which had been circulating as to its nature. We quote an account of the latter incident, which shows his connection with an historical incident which was presumably of some consequence to the religious history of New York:[91]

March the 1st, Mr. Hegeman, justice of the peace in Filkentown [i.e. Filkintown], arrived in Shekomeko, and informed Br. Mack, that it was his duty to inquire, what sort of people the Brethren were, for that the most dangerous tenets and views were ascribed to them. He added, that as to himself, he disbelieved all those lying reports concerning them, and acknowledeged the mission in Shekomeko to be a work of God, because, by the labour of the Brethren, the most savage heathen had been so evidently changed, that he, and many other Christians, were put to shame by their godly walking and conversation: but that, notwithstanding his own persuasion, it would be of service to the Brethren themselves, if he was suffered minutely to examine into their affairs, with a view to silence their adversaries. Hearing that Br. Buettner was absent, he only desired that he might be informed of his return, and thus left them … till May, when Brother Buettner returning to Shekomeko, the missionaries informed the justice of the peace of his arrival. Upon this, a corporal came on the 14th, to demand their attendance on the Friday following in Pickipsi [i.e. Poughkeepsie], about thirty miles off, to exercise the militia. But their names not being inserted in the list, they did not appear. Soon after, a similar message being sent … Br. Buettner went some days previous to the time appointed, to Captain Herrman in Reinbeck, and represented to him, that as ministers called to preach the Gospel to the heathen, they ought to be exempted from military services. The captain replied, that they would be under a necessity to prove and swear to the validity of their calling…. On June 24th, a justice of the peace, with some officers and twelve men, arrived from Pickipsi at Shekomeko, and examined the whole affair. He … wished them to take two oaths. One was: “That king George, being the lawful sovereign of the kingdom, he would not in any way encourage the Pretender.” The other: “That he rejected transubstantiation, the worship of the Virgin Mary, purgatory, &c.” … The justice … engaged the missionaries in a penalty of £40 to appear before the court in Pickipsie on the 16th of October….
     June 22d, the missionaries went to Reineck in obedience to a summons received…. They were now called upon in public court to prove that they were privileged teachers. Buettner produced his written vocation, and his certificate of ordination, duly signed by Bishop David Nitschman. All these evidences were rejected by the court. But the justice, Mr. Beckman [i.e. Beeckman], assured the missionaries, that he had no idea of punishing them, but only wished to examine into their affairs, and therefore desired them to appear before the court to be held at Pickipsi in October next.
     But the accusations of their enemies increasing very fast, the magistrates thought proper to hasten the examination, and the missionaries were obliged to appear in Filkentown on the 14th of July, their friend John Rau (a farmer near Shekomeko) kindly accompanying them…. Three witnesses were … heard against them. But their evidence being partly without foundation, and partly nugatory and trifling, it made no impression upon the court. John Rau was next examined. He answered, that he had known the Brethren from their first coming into the country, and could say nothing but what tended to their honour…. Upon this the court broke up, and they were again honourably acquitted.
     Meanwhile the adversaries of the Brethren had repeatedly accused them before the governor of New York, till he at length resolved to send for them, and to examine into the truth of these reports. The Brn. Buettner and Senseman from Shekomeko, and Shaw from Bethlehem, went accordingly, and found upon their arrival, that the attention of the whole town was raised. But Mr. Beckman, who had examined the Brethren in Reinbeck, happening at that time to be in New York, publicly took their part, and affirmed, that “the good done by them among the Indians was undeniable.”
     August 11th and 12th, these three Brethren were ordered before the governor and the court, and each separately examined…. August the 21st they had leave to return home….
     It now appeared plain to every candid observer, that the accusations against the Brethren arose either from misconception or malice. Many people, and even some of distinguished rank among the magistrates, acknowledged the sincerity of their views, and the good arising from their endeavours…. Their adversaries therefore were obliged to adopt other measures, in which they succeeded. For, on 15th of December, the sheriff and three justices of the peace arrived at Shekomeko, and, in the name of the governor and council of New York, prohibited all meetings of the Brethren; commanding the missionaries to appear before the court at Pickipsi, on the 17th instant … when an Act was read to them, by which the ministers of the congregation of the Brethren … were expelled [from] the country, under a heavy penalty, ever more to appear among the Indians, without having first taken the oaths of allegiance.[92]

It is unfortunate that this account becomes so vague in its latter passages as to the names of the participants. It is not clear whether Hegeman continued to support the Moravians once he realized that they refused to perform military service and swear oaths, a question which presumably surfaces here because of the French and Indian Wars. Following this incident, the order moved the center of its missionary activities to Pennsylvania.
     “Francis Hageman” and his wife’s step-father are mentioned in a deed of 12 April 1748,[93] and the property of “Francis Hegerman” is mentioned incidentally in a deed dated 7 April 1749.[94] According to the Hegeman manuscript by Driggs, in 1749 Frans Hegeman “joins with a score of other proprietors to deed a disputed plot in Lower Nine Partners.” We know he could sign his name, for as “Fransis Hagaman” he attests to five documents concerning the highways, dated between 1738 and 1741.[95] In an earlier version of these notes we had suggested that a “Francis Hegeman” witnessed the 1749 will of Nicasius Cowenhoven, of Brooklyn, but have subsequently discovered that this is an error in the printed text for “Dennis Hegeman.”[96]
     Frans Hegeman and his wife “Antje Ruord” served as sponsors to a child of her half-brother Henry Filkin, baptized in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church in 1738. They also served as sponsors at the baptisms of two of his grandsons (and namesakes) in the Dutch Church of Poughkeepsie: the first of Francis Harris, son of their daughter Catharina (Hegeman) Harris, in May 1740, and the second of Francis, son of their son Hendrick Hegeman, in Feb. 1743. They also served in the Kingston Dutch Church for the baptism of his wife’s granddaughter and namesake, Antjen Parmentier, in 1738, and at Poughkeepsie in the same year for Cornelis, son of his wife’s half-brother, Henry Filkin, Jr., as previously mentioned.
     Frans Hegeman had children baptized at Jamaica, Queen’s Co., L.I. in 1715, and at New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., N.J., in 1719. In addition to his provable children, a “Maria Heegeman” was a sponsor for Peter, son of Joseph Harris and Catharina Hegeman, in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on 27 May 1739. He was not, however, the father of Sara Hegeman, wife of William Allen, as stated in Drigg’s Hegeman manuscript; she was rather a daughter of Frans’ brother, Joseph Hegeman, as proved by her mother’s will.
     Issue (order partly inferential):

  1. Catharina Hegeman, b. say 1711, living 1746, m. by 1737, Joseph Harris, of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., New York, son of Peter Harris, of New London, by the latter’s wife Elizabeth Manwaring, daughter of Oliver Manwaring (or Mainwaring), also of New London, was bapt. 12 June 1709 in the First Church of New London, Connecticut, and was still alive in 1746.[97] Catharina and her husband rented their Crum Elbow farm from her mother’s half-brother, Francis Filkin, who notes in 1746 that Harris “ran away before the year was up and left his wife and … children upon the farm….”[98] Their children have been treated thoroughly by Jones, and we have significant detail to add only in regard to a few of their sons:[99]
    1. (Capt.) Peter Harris, J.P., bapt. 26 May 1739 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Pieter Harris and Maria Heegeman, d. 19 June 1779 at New York City. He m. by New York licence dated 27 May 1763,[100] Sarah Dubois, daughter (and probably heiress) of Gideon Dubois, by his wife Sara, daughter of Col. Barent Van Kleeck and Antoinette Parmentier.[101] Peter Harris served in the French War and afterward became a merchant, dying after a brief service on the British side in the Revolution. Sarah, who as Jones notes brought her family to Nova Scotia in 1783, made petitions in 1786 for reparation of her husband’s war losses, stating that he had left money in the hands of “Isaac Haegaman [our no. 8], farmer, of Rombout [now Fishkill].”[102] Although we have found few records relating to this family in Nova Scotia, we can state that her son DuBois d. of consumption and was buried 3 March 1791 at Shelburne, presumably at Christ Church.[103] Some of her Bell and Hemeon descendants are found at Shelburne Tp., Shelburne Co., in the 1827 census of Nova Scotia.[104]
    2. Francis Harris, bapt. 9 May 1740 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Francis Heegeman and Antjen Ruwaard, d. in Nova Scotia in 1816, between 1 April (when he made his will) and 27 Dec. (when it was proved).[105] He m. (1) Catharina Lent,[106] daughter of Isaac Lent, of Fishkill, by his wife Sara Luyster, and (2) Engeltje (“Evangeline”) Vandewater, probably a daughter of Peter Vandewater (or Van De Water), of Hopewell and Fishkill, by his wife Egtje de Lange.[107] Jones states that Francis Harris was “probably the Loyalist of that name whose estate was confiscated in Dutchess County and who went to Digby, Nova Scotia, after the peace.”[108] That he was indeed such is verified by the perfect agreement of Canadian records with the New York sources cited by Jones as to his four eldest children (the first two of whom were by his first wife, and the others by his second). In addition to these he was father of two children presumably born in Canada, and named in his will. Francis Harris was one of the six original associates in the Hatfield grant of 1801, receiving 100 acres.[109] Issue:

      (by first wife:)

      1. Peter Harris, evidently a somewhat important citizen in Digby,[110] m. 5 March 1793 in Trinity Church, Digby, in a double wedding with his sister Hannah,[111] Esther Saunders, and had a daughter Evangeline named in his father’s will.
      2. Catharine Harris, m. by New York licence dated 13 July 1782,[112] John Comfort, Jr., and they accompanied her father to Digby, later removing to Clinton Tp., Lincoln Co., Upper Canada, where they founded a large family.[113]

      (by second wife:)

      1. Stephen Harris, mentioned in a letter written in 1810 by his sister Hannah.[114]
      2. Hannah Harris, bapt. 27 Aug. 1777 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church; m. 5 March 1793 at Digby, John Saunders, and had issue.
      3. Francis Harris, Jr., of Bayham Tp., Bayham Tp., Elgin Co., U.C. (now Ontario), b. in May or June of 1788 (if the age given on his tombstone is correct) in Nova Scotia, bapt. 20 Sept. 1791 at Sandy Cove by the minister of Trinity Anglican Church, Digby, d. 25 Sept. 1847, aged 59 years, 3 months (according to his tombstone), and was buried in Estherville Cemetery, Estherville, Ontario. He m. 16 March 1808 in old Trinity Anglican Church, Digby,[115] Rachel McDormand (alive at the making of her husband’s will on 29 March 1847), said to have been b. ca. 1784 at Westport, Brier Island, Digby County, Nova Scotia, daughter of James McDormand, of Westport, and afterwards of Port Burwell, by the latter’s wife Ann Rice.[116] They had twelve children.
      4. Sarah.
  2. 7Hendrick Hegeman, bapt. 27 March 1715 at Jamaica, Queen’s Co., with sponsors Hendrikus and Arriaentie Hegeman [the father’s parents].
  3. 8Isaac Hegeman, b. say 1717.
  4. 9Frans Hegeman, Jr., bapt. 12 June 1719 at New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., N.J.[117]
  5. 10Adriaentje Hegeman, b. say 1720.

4.   Joseph3 Hegeman (Hendrick2, Adriaen1),[118] of Flatbush and Jamaica, was b. say 1691 at New Lots (according to his marriage record), and d. 1741, between 1 April (when he made his will) and 5 May (when it was proved). He m. (as her first husband) 6 Feb. 1714 in the Flatbush Dutch Church, Sara van der Vliet, b. 7 Nov. 1694, bapt. 14 Nov. following, probably in the Flatbush Dutch Church,[119] daughter of Jan Dirckse van der Vliet, of Flatbush, by his wife Geertje ver Kerk,[120] and apparently a sister of the Marritje van der Vliet who married Joseph’s brother Adriaen Hegeman (no. 2); she m. secondly in 1744, as his second wife, Johannes Coerten van Voorhees, but without further issue.[121] d. 1755-58, and as his widow made her will dated 4 Oct. 1770, and proved 16 Nov. 1773.[122]
     Bergen (p. 138) confuses this man with his first cousin, Joseph3 Hegeman, Jr., son of Joseph Hegeman and Femmetje Rems van der Beeck, who was probably the Joseph Hegeman who served as a member from Kings Co. in the 17th New York Assembly of 1716-1726.[123] This other Joseph married in 1712 Adriaentje van Wyck, who was still alive in 1726, when they baptized their second child in the New Utrecht Dutch Church. Meanwhile, the present Joseph Hegeman, “of Jamaica,” married in 1714 Sara van der Vliet, and the record, significantly, does not call him a widower. Thus we clearly are dealing with two different men.[124]
     Interestingly, the true parentage of the present Joseph Hegeman was given many years ago in Cuyler Reynolds, Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley, 4 vols. (1914), 1:506, but this account seems to have gone unnoticed or ignored by subsequent writers. And the same correct account is given even earlier in a letter written by a descendant of this branch of the family, Annie W. (Candee) Scofield, to her father’s cousin, Edward Ostrom, dated 17 Feb. 1904.[125] The fact that Hendrick and Adriaentje Hegeman served as baptismal sponsors for his first, second, and fourth children can leave little doubt as to his identity. Joseph Hegeman and his wife were, in turn, sponsors for Barentje, daughter of his brother Adriaen, in 1734. In contrast, he had no known contact whatsoever with Joseph2 Hegeman or with members of the latter’s family.
     His will, dated as noted above, reads, in a published abstract:

I, Joseph Hegeman, of Jamaica, on Long Island… give to my wife Sarah, the use of all my lands and real estate while she remains my widow. But as soon as she marries [again] she shall deliver them up to my sons. After her decease I leave all my real estate to my sons, John, Hendrick, and Joseph, and they are to pay £150 to each of their three sisters, Ariantie, wife of Hendrick Lott, Elizabeth, and Sarah. All personal estate to my wife and six children. I make my wife Sarah executor. My eldest son, John, is to have £25. Witnesses: Benjamin Whitehead, John Dorlandt, S. Clowes.[126]

The present Joseph Hegeman was probably the one of this name whose seat in the Jamaica Dutch Church is said to have been purchased by Derrick Bergen (brother of Jannetje Bergen, who married Joseph’s son Jan) on 1 June 1745, although if the date is correct it is some years after this Joseph’s death.[127]
     Probably in early 1742, his widow went to Poughkeepsie, where her brother-in-law Frans Hegeman was already living, and where her sons Hendrick and Jan had bought land a few years earlier. Apparently she took her entire family with her. Her will (cited above) reads, in part:

I give to my son, John Hegeman, the sum of £10 for his birthright. The remainer of my estate to all the children of my son, John Hegeman, by his first wife; and the children of my son, Henry Hegeman, deceased; and to the children of my son Joseph Hegeman, deceased; and to the children of Henry Lott, deceased; and to the children of William Allen, which he hath by his first wife, deceased.

The executors were “Joseph Hegeman, son of Henry Hegeman, deceased.” It is somewhat odd that the daughter Elisabeth is entirely overlooked.
     After deducting from the account in Bergen’s Kings County (p. 138) of the comingled Josephs the two sons Cornelis (1724, not 1722) and Rem (1726), baptized in the New Utrecht Dutch Church as sons of Joseph Hegeman and Adriaentje [van Wyck], we are still left with a child Maria, bapt. 25 July 1736 in the New Utrecht Dutch Church, as a daughter of “Joseph and Sara Hegeman.” The register of the same church also shows a Rem Hegeman with the same parentage, bapt. 6 Aug. 1738, not mentioned by Bergen. These children were baptized more than a decade later than the known children of the present Joseph Hegeman, and are not named in his will, so we must seek a more plausible identification of their parents. The sponsors for the first child, namely Adriaen Hegeman and Femmetje Schenck, furnish us with an oblique but crucial clue in this matter, for they also served on 7 Oct. 1739 in the Jamaica Dutch Church as sponsors for a child of Adriaen Hegeman and Dorothy Onderdonck, and this Adriaen had a brother Joseph4 (Adriaen3, Joseph2, Adriaen1) who married in 1735 Sara Martense, the account of which man in Stoutenburgh convinces us that he was the real father of these children.[128]
     Issue, all baptisms in the Jamaica Dutch Church:[129]

  1. Hendrick Hegeman, bapt. 24 March 1714 with sponsors Hendrikus and Arriaentje Hegeman, only one month after his parents’ marriage; d. by 1717, when another son was given the same name.
  2. Adriaentje Hegeman, bapt. 1 April 1716 with sponsors Hendricus and Adriaentie Hegeman, living 1745. She m. by 1741, Hendrick Lott, living 1745 but d. by 1770 (when he is called “deceased” in the will of his mother-in-law), perhaps the one of this name bapt. 11 Nov. 1715 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, son of Johannis and Antie (____) Lodt, with sponsors Pieter Lodt and Catrÿntie Lodt, and pretty surely also the “Hendrick Lott, widower” who m. 19 Sept. 1755 in the Nine Partners Patent, by the minister of the Presbyterian Church of Rombout (now Fishkill),[130] Hester Buckhout, and is said in the Lott genealogy to have d. 1762-63.[131] Although he was but one of several contemporary men with the same name, we may state with some confidence that he was the Hendrick Lott, weaver, of Newtown, who joined with his wife’s brother Hendrick Hegeman to purchase 3626 acres of lot 8 in the Nine Partners Patent in 1739,[132] and the one of this name who in 1742 served as a baptismal sponsor for Hendrick Hegeman’s son Hendrick, baptized in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on the same day as Hendrick Lott’s own son Joseph. Hendrick Lott was still at Poughkeepsie in 1745, when his second child was baptized; we have found no evidence that his wife Adriaentje was alive after that date. If he indeed married secondly Hester Buckhout, then he must be the “Henry Lott, of Dutchess County, esquire, being very sick in body,” who made a will dated 9 March 1762 and proved 18 Jan. 1763, naming wife Hester, children Abraham (to whom he leaves £50), Mary and Sarah, and making “my brother, Peter Lott, of New York, and his son, Abraham Lott, executors.” The witnesses were Jacob R. Everson, Benj. Knight, and Paulus Mauerer or Mowrer.[133] Nothing further has been found respecting this brother, Peter Lott (who does not appear to have been baptized at Jamaica). The names of these three children do not overlap enough with those known from baptismal records for us to be sure we are dealing with the same family, and the 1770 will of his mother-in-law, which mentions the “children of Hendrick Lott, deceased,” but does not name them, is not particularly helpful in this regard. Known issue:
    1. Joseph Lott, bapt. 8 June 1742 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Henderikus Heegman and Sara Heegman [probably the mother’s siblings]. If his father was indeed the man who married Hester Buckhout, then this child must have died young, as he is not mentioned in his father’s will.
    2. Maria Lott, bapt. 2 Feb. 1745 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church; no sponsors named in the record. Ostensibly on 27 Sept. 1778 there was baptized (without sponsors) in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church an Abraham Van Horn, “born 21 Oct. 1778 [sic],” son of James Van Horn and “Moica” Lott — is this a corruption of Marika, a diminutive form of Maria? No other issue of this couple has been traced, and indeed Van Horn is not a Poughkeepsie name. For what it is worth, an Abraham Van Horn m. 16 Feb. 1800 in the Fishkill Dutch Church, Jemima Bunschoten.
  3. 11Jan Hegeman, called “eldest son” in his father’s will, bapt. 1 April 1716, on the same day as his sister Adriaentje, with sponsors Jan and Geertie van der Vliet.
  4. 12Hendrick Hegeman, bapt. 10 Nov. 1717 with sponsors Hendricus and Arriaentie Hegeman [the father’s parents].
  5. Joseph Hegeman, Jr.,[134] bapt. 29 March 1719 with sponsors Jan and Catrina van Pelt, living 1741 but d. v.m. by 1770, when “the children of my son, Joseph Hegeman, deceased,” are mentioned but not named in his mother’s will. He m. by 1741, Sara Bergen, sister of the Derrick Bergen who m. Femmetje Blom (no. 6.i) and of the Jannetje Bergen who m. Jan Hegeman (no. 11), and daughter of Teunis Bergen, of Jamaica, by the latter’s wife Marritje Woertman.[135] As Sara Hegeman, she m. (2) 16 June 1754 in the Rumbout Presbyterian Church, John Fox, of Nine Partners. She m. (3) ____ Bond, as indicated by her designation as “the widow Sarah Bond, mother of Joseph and John Hagaman, who was one of the first settlers of this place,” on her tombstone in the Presbyterian churchyard at Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., which states that she d. 24 Jan. 1803 “in her 83d year”?[136] Known issue:
    1. Joseph Hegeman, farmer, bapt. 30 March 1741 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsors Jan Hegeman and Saara Hegeman, d. 1798. According to Barth he m. Marie ____.
    2. Maria Hegeman, bapt. 17 Feb. 1743 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, as a daughter of “Joseph Hegemondt and Sarche Berrecker [?],” no sponsors named. Sarche is an eighteenth-century corruption of Sartje, a nickname for Sara, but ‘Berrecker’ does not resemble any surname known at Poughkeepsie. (Mrs. Worden, in her edition of the register, reads “Lereuker.” Driggs gives “Berrecker” under his account of Joseph’s father, but “Berricher” or “Berricher” under his account of Joseph.)
    3. John Hegeman, b. say 1746, d. 18 Jan. 1814, a captain in the War of 1812, in the 7th regiment of Albany Co. Militia. According to Barth he m. ca. 1779, Charity Vosberg, and both are buried in Niver Cemetery, Craryville, Columbia Co., N.Y.
  6. Elisabeth Hegeman, bapt. 3 Feb. 1723 with sponsors Gerret Blom, and Elisabet Heegaman. She was unmarried at the making of her father’s will in April 1741, but is likely the one who m. about this time, as his first wife, Zacharias Flagler, Jr., bapt. 6 July or 12 Oct. 1720 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church,[137] son of Zacharias Flügler, of Poughkeepsie, a Palatine immigrant of 1710, by the latter’s third wife, Anna Elisabetha (Hobin) Schout or Schultz. As “Zacharias Vlegelaar, widower of Elizabeth Hegeman,” he married secondly in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, by banns published 6 Nov. 1747, “Zari Barter” (i.e. Sara Barton, daughter of Joseph Barton by his first wife, Abigail Lewis),[138] by whom he had six children baptized in the Presbyterian Church of Rombout (now Fishkill) and Poughkeepsie between 1750 and 1756,[139] as well as four others mentioned in family records used by McCracken. He is likely (as McCracken thought) the “Zachariah Flagler, of Clinton” who d. 27 July 1807, despite the fact that his stated age of 85 years would correspond to a birthdate of 1721-22.[140] Elisabeth Hegeman’s only known child was:
    1. Joseph Flagler, bapt. June 1742 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Willem Elling and Sara Heegman. He was baptized with Joseph Lott and Hendrick Hegeman, Jr., who were presumably his first cousins. We have found no further record of him.
  7. Sara Hegeman, bapt. 7 Feb. 1725 with sponsors Jan and Marytie Heegaman, d. by 1770. She m. (as his first wife) 9 Aug. 1744 at Poughkeepsie (the ceremony being performed by Justice Francis Filkin),[141] William Allen, whose wife is erroneously made a daughter of Frans Hegeman (no. 3) in Driggs’ Hegeman manuscript. He remarried after her death, for her mother’s will of 1770 mentions, without naming, “children of William Allan by his first wife, deceased.” He is almost certainly identical with the William Allen of Charlotte (now Clinton) Precinct, Dutchess Co., “yeoman,” who made his will, dated 20 June 1772 and proved 11 Nov. 1773, one of the witnesses to which was Zacharias Flagler. It mentions wife Mary, and children John, Joseph, Willem, Elizabeth, Mary, Aureyanche (wife of Benjamin Haight), Sarah (“to be supported and maintained out of my estate for ever”), Hester, and Hannah.[142]
         It is not clear which of these children were by Sarah, although “Aureyanche” [ i.e. Adriaentje], wife of Benjamin Haight (allegedly b. ca. 1750, d. 1832), would appear to be a plausible candidate on chronological grounds. Her husband, who is mentioned in numerous IGI and LDS Ancestral File entries, was of Charlotte Precinct. It seems pretty clear that he was a son of Caleb Haight and Elizabeth Bailey.[143] Some authors state that he m. firstly, a Harriet Allen, while others have regarded “Harriet” as a variant of “Aureyanche,” which is perfectly plausible given the vagaries of eighteenth-century spelling. A large number of descendants of this couple have been traced.[144]

5.   Catharina2 Hegeman (Hendrick2, Adriaen1), b. ca. 1697-8, d. 2 April 1757 “in the 60th year of her age.” She m. 8 Sept. 1716 in the Flatbush Dutch Church, Jan Aertse van Pelt, bapt. 25 Dec. 1696 in the Brooklyn Dutch Church, d. 22 Oct. 1766 “aged 79 years,” son of Aert Theunissen Lanen van Pelt, of New Utrecht, and Neeltje Jans van Thuyl.[145] She is referred to in their marriage record as “born at and living in Jamaica” and he as “born at and living in New Utrecht.” Her parents served as baptismal sponsors to her eldest child, and her parentage is further confirmed by the presence of her and her husband as baptismal sponsors for Joseph, son of Joseph Hegeman (no. 4) in 1719.
     In the 1731 census of New Utrecht, “Jan van Pelt” is listed as having a household (including himself) of 2 males and 2 females above ten years, 1 male and 3 females under ten years, and one male slave.[146] Catharina and her husband sold land at New Utrecht in 1742,[147] and are said by Parsons to have removed to New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., N.J. in that same year.
    Of the six children which seemed to be implied for this couple in the 1731 census of New Utrecht, only two are accounted for here. There is a large gap, particulary, between the first and second of the known children we show, and though the register of the New Utrecht Dutch Church where they were baptized seems reasonably complete for the period, that of Flatbush, where others might well have been taken, is quite sporadic.
     Known issue (all baptisms in the New Utrecht Dutch Church):

  1. Adriaentje van Pelt, b. 11 Jan. 1720, bapt. 17 Jan. following with sponsors “Hendricus Hegeman and his wife Adriaantje.” She m. (possibly as his first wife) 18 Nov. 1743 (but where?), her first cousin, Guysbert Sutphen (Jr.), of Bedminster Tp., Somerset Co., New Jersey, b. 23 Aug. 1720, d. 16 Nov. 1796, and buried in Bedminster churchyard, son of Guysbert Sutphen, of Monmouth Co., and Geertruy Aerse van Pelt.[148] He is said to have m. secondly in Oct. 1789, Peternella Voorhees, of New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., N.J. According to A. Van Doren Honeyman, the historian of Somerset County, “Guisbert Sutphen … was a prominent man in Bedminster, a magistrate in 1774, and Judge of the Courts from at least 1778,” and Honeyman cites a receipt dated 26 Jan. 1788 refering to him as “Gisbert Sutfin, Collector for the Township of Bedminster.”[149]
         According to an account of Guysbert Sutphen and his brother-in-law, Matthias Lane (who married Elisabeth Sutphen),
    Matthias Lane, Sr., and Guisbert Sutphen, his brother-in-law, both left Monmouth co. to make their future home in Somerset co. in 1744. The two were married on the same day…, and, as both purchased lands in Somerset the next year, both may have journeyed there at the same or nearly the same time. The lands purchased by them were near together…. Matthias’ purchase was on May 14, 1744, and consisted of two tracts; the one bounded by land … “now in possession of Robert Rosbrough,” and the “Allamatunk river” [Lamington], and contained 382 acres. The other, adjoining, was bounded by the same river and “John Adams,” and contained 186 acres…. The tract, probably adjoining, which Guisbert Sutphen purchased, of about 300 acres, is said to have been sold by him to Matthias Lane in 1745, but I have been unable to verify it by recorded deeds.[150]
         A nineteenth-century account of the founding of the Dutch Church at Bedminister, N.J., states:
    Guisbert Sutphen lived on a farm lying half a mile north of the Larger Cross Roads, which is now owned and occupied by his great-grandson, Amos Sutphen. With his wife, Ariontje Van Pelt, he had entered the township in 1743, travelling with their children and household goods in an ox-cart from Monmouth county, where his father, also named Guisbert, had settled early in the century. When it was decided to build Bedminster church, differences of opinion arose as to the location. Both Sutphen and Van der Veer offered liberal inducements to have the building placed at points of their selection. Mr. Sutphen’s choice was for the vicinity of the Larger Cross Roads, but eventually Mr. Van der Veer’s views prevailed, and the new structure was erected on the site of the present edifice below the village of the Lesser Cross Roads, or Bedminster. The first minute of the new congregation was made by Mr. Hardenbergh in the Raritan church books on Christmas, 1758…. It is probable that the church was erected in that or the following year. Two acres of land were donated by Jacobus Van der Veer, who also furnished fifty pounds sterling and one-third of all the oak timber. The same amount of money, together with one-half of the oak necessary for the frame, was the gift of Guisbert Sutphen.[151]
    This account mentions a great-grandson, Amos Sutphen, without giving the complete line of descent.
         Known issue:
    1. Gertrude Sutphen, b. 14 Oct. 1745, probably in Monmouth Tp. She m. 8 Feb. 1764, her first and second cousin, Guisbert Sutphen, of Bedminster Tp., son of Derick Sutphen and Neeltje Roelofse Schenk, and grandson of Guysbert Sutphen, of Monmouth Co., and Geertruy Aerse van Pelt. They had issue.
    2. Catherine Sutphen, b. 9 Oct. 1747, probably in Monmouth Tp.
    3. Elizabeth Sutphen, b. 5 May 1750 in Bedminster Tp.
    4. John Sutphen or Sutfin, b. 18 Aug. 1752 in Bedminster Tp. He is said to have m. 16 Sept. 1770, Sara Phoenix.
    5. Eleanor Sutphen, b. 19 Jan. 1755 in Bedminster Tp.
    6. Grietje (“Poege”) Sutphen, b. 15 Aug. 1757 in Bedminster Tp.
    7. Guysbert/Guisbert Sutphen (III), b. 5 Feb. 1760 in Bedminster Tp., stated by A. Van Doren Honeyman, the historian of Somersety County, to have been a “son of Guisbert Sutphen and Ariantje Van Pelt.”[152] He m. 2 Sept. 1786 (“as per license formerly in Somerset Surrogate’s office, but now missing”), Mary (Allen?). According to Honeyman, “Guisbert is presumed to have gone West.”
    8. (Capt.) Peter Sutphen, of Bedminster, b. 17 Aug. 1762 in Bedminster Tp. According to a nineteenth-century history, “Guisbert Sutphen’s official robe seems to have descended in the line of his family, for here is another commission of thirty years later appointing his son Peter justice of the peace…. Peter Sutphen’s honors were not confined to the judiciary. We now come upon a third commission, dated in September, 1797, appointing him to the captaincy of a troop of horse in a Somerset battalion, commanded by Major James Henry…. He also commanded the New Jersey militia that aided in suppressing the Pennsylvania whiskey insurrection of 1794. His death in Trenton in 1803 at the early age of forty-nine was much deplored.”[153] He m. 26 April 1788 in Bedminster Tp., Catherine Hunt, daughter of Col. Stephen Hunt. For their ten children see Kristin Robinson’s Peachey website, cited above. Among these were sons Gilbert Blair Sutphen[154] and Peter Sutphen, Jr.[155]
  2. Catharina van Pelt, bapt. 9 May 1731; no sponsors named. An undocumented passage in the 1913 Van Pelt genealogy has been frequently cited for her supposed marriage, on 30 April 1758 in the New York Dutch Church,[156] to Nicholas Quackenbos, b. 25 Aug. 1734 and bapt. 28 Aug. following in the Albany Dutch Church, son of Johannes Quackenbos (or Quackenbosch) and Margaretha Bogaert.[157] This is erroneous; the Catharina Van Pelt who married Nicholas Quackenbos was in fact the one bapt. 16 Feb. 1735 in the New York Dutch Church, a daughter of Jan Van Pelt and Hillegond Boekenhoven.[158]
  3. Teunis van Pelt, bapt. 5 May 1734; no sponsors named.
  4. Jan van Pelt, bapt. 17 April 1737; sponsor: Geertje, wife of Petrus van Pelt.

6.   Judicke2 Hegeman (Hendrick2, Adriaen1),[159] b. say 1699, living 4 Nov. 1726 (when her youngest child was baptized) but d. before 1736 (when her husband was remarried). Although at her birth her parents had not yet named a daughter for each of their mothers, it may be presumed that the pattern was interrupted to honor her mother’s fairly recently-deceased sister Judith (wife of Johannes Wynkoop of Kingston), who died ca. 1695 at the age of only about 30 years. Judicke Hegeman m. before 1720, as his first wife, Gerrit Blom, evidently of Jamaica, L.I. (where all his children were baptized), who was b. say 1696, and living 18 Oct. 1760, a son of Barent Janse Blom, of Flushing,[160] by the latter’s wife Femmetje (probably a Snediker).[161]
     The only known records which mention her — those of the baptisms of her three children in the Dutch church of Jamaica, Queens County, L.I. — refer to her only by her married name, but the appearance of Hendrick Hegeman and Adriaentje Bloetgoet as sponsors leaves little doubt that they were her parents, especially as the child for whom the latter stood as sponsor was named Adriaentje. This conclusion is bolstered by the fact that Judicke’s husband served in 1723 at Jamaica as a baptismal sponsor for a child of Joseph Hegeman, son of Hendrick Hegeman and Adriaentje Bloetgoet. Furthermore, a Joseph Hegeman, probably the son of the latter couple, served as a sponsor for a child of Judicke’s husband Gerrit Blom by his second wife.
     Gerrit Blom is left £10 in his father’s will of 1726, which mentions five sons, John, Abraham, George, Jacob, and Gerritt,[162] while the 1760 will of this Abraham mentions “my three brothers, Garritt, George, and Isaac,” proving that Gerrit was then still alive.[163] He m. (2) before 1736, Marritje (“Malle”) ____, and had four more children, all baptized in the Jamaica Dutch Church: (a) Christiaen, bapt. 16 May 1736 with sponsors Jan Snedeker and Catryna Snedeker; (b) Jan, bapt. 22 July 1738 with sponsors Abraham Blom and Geertruy Blom; (c) Juedeke, bapt. 21 Feb. 1741 with sponsors Joseph Hegeman [probably his first wife’s brother] and Femmetie Blom; and (d) Maria, bapt. 14 April 1746 with no sponsors named. The names of the sponsors, and the fact that the first daughter of this marriage received the name Judicke, indicate the identity of this Gerrit with the husband of Judicke Hegeman. This inference is confirmed by the appearance of “Gert Blom and Malle Blom” as baptismal sponsors for a child of his daughter Adriaentje Blom and her husband Jacobus Burtis in 1749, and of “Gerret Blom and Malle Blom” in the same capacity for a child of his son Barent Blom in 1751.
     Known issue, all baptized in the Jamaica Dutch Church:

  1. Femmetje Blom, bapt. 27 Aug. 1721 with sponsors Hendrikus Hegeman and Femmetie Blome [i.e. Femmetje, wife of Barent Blom], d. 2 June 1779. She m. before 1751, Derrick Bergen, bapt. 10 Dec. 1717 in the Brooklyn Dutch Church, d. 12 June 1799, brother of Sarah Bergen, wife of Joseph Hegeman (no. 4.v), and of Jannetje Bergen, wife of Jan Hegeman (no. 11), and son of Theunis Bergen, of Jamaica, by his wife Marritje Woertman.[164] He is mentioned as “my son Dirck” in the 1755 will of Teunis Bergen, of Jamaica.[165] According to the 1876 Bergen genealogy, he
    resided on and owned a farm near Jamaica, and March 27th, 1792, sold about 70 acres of the easterly side of his farm for £950, to Peter Stoothoff, of Flatlands (see lib. F, p. 116, of con., Queen’s county clerk’s office).
         June 1st, 1745, he bought the seat of Joseph Hegeman, in the Reformed Dutch Church, of Jamaica, and May 20th, 1753, Femmetje, his wife, bought the woman’s seat in the same church, of her father, Garret Blom. April 13th, 1776, Derrik Bergen, and 11 of his neighbors, asked relief of the provincial congress for having been lately plundered of their cattle and effects, by order of Capt. Ephraim Bailey, for not appearing in arms at military drill, to answer to their names, when it was well known they had been deprived of their arms by Col. Hand (see Onderdonk’s Queen’s County, p. 50).
         September 1st, 1777, after the battle of Long Island, and the occupation of the island by the British, 188 of the inhabitants of Jamaica, at the request of Gov. Tryon, contributed £219 towards raising Col. Fanning’s corps. Towards this sum Derrik Bergen contributed 8s.… (see Onderdonk’s Queen’s County).
         From Derrick’s being charged by the sexton of the Episcopal Church for a grave for his wife, in June, 1779, and his estate being charged for his grave June 13th, 1799, it may be inferred he belonged to that denomination.[166]

    We may mention that the records of the Jamaica Episcopal church of this period are no longer extant, having apparently perished before Bergen’s time. The 1876 Bergen genealogy lists three children without birth or baptismal records, and no supporting evidence for their parentage; namely, Richard, Peter, and Garret. In the opinion of the present compiler, the only children who can be securely assigned to this couple are:

    1. Maria Bergen, bapt. 9 June 1751 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsors Teunes Bergen and Maettyi Bergen. The 1876 Bergen genealogy, p. 164, says she d. 1 Sept. 1828, having m. 10 June 1798, John Bergen, son of Jacobus and Marrytie, without issue. It also states that her will was dated 27 Jan. 1827, was proved 2 Sept. 1828, and was recorded in the office of the surrogate of Queen’s county, in lib. F, p. 115, to which she signed her name “Mary Bargen,” and in which she devised £100 to her niece Maria, wife of Albert Doxy, and appointed Oldfield Bergen [her nephew] and Albert Doxy executors.
    2. Jan Bergen, bapt. 9 Oct. 1754 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsor Mattye Bergen. According to the 1876 Bergen genealogy, pp. 164-6, he was b. 9 Sept. 1754, and d. 9 Sept. 1828, with will dated 27 Oct. 1828. He m. 12 Nov. 1780, Mariam Oldfield, b. 18 Feb. 1763, d. 9 June 1851, daughter of Joseph Oldfield. According to the 1876 Bergen genealogy, his will, dated 27 Oct. 1825, proved 30 Sept. 1828, and recorded in lib. F, p. 133, in office of surrogate of Queen’s county, while his wife’s will was dated 17 Aug. 1849, proved 28 July 1851, and recorded in lib. 2, p. 15, also in the office of the surrogate of Queen’s county. Also according to Bergen,
      Jan or John Bergen owned a farm of 70 acres on the turnpike road from Jamaica to the Great Plains, and within the boundaries of Hempsted, on which he resided, distant about four miles from the village of Jamaica; also a farm of ninety acres on the turnpike from Jamaica to Hempsted, about four miles from the latter place. These farms were advertised for sale at auction, on the 17th of Feb., 1829, by his son Nicholas Bergen and Michael Skidmore, his executors. The one on which he resided, including a plot of woodland at Rocky Hill, in the town of Flushing, of 5 acres 1 rood and 38 perches, and a lot of salt meadows, was sold to Daniel Bayles for $2811.30; the other, including a wood lot of 5 acres, to Jane Everit for $1775 (see lib. Y, pp. 23 and 180, of con., Queen’s county clerk’s office.) His widow Miriam bought, May 17th, 1831, of Ann Maria Lambertson, for $1,400, a house and lot about 50 by 210 feet, on the south side of the turnpike, in the village of Jamaica, nearly opposite to the house of Eliphalet Weeks. June 1st, 1835, she sold these premises to Sarah Gunn for $1,800 (see lib. B B, p. 3, and lib. G G, p. 486, of con., Queen’s county clerk’s office).
      According to the same source (which see for much more detail), he had the following issue:
      1. Phebe Bergen, b. 15 Nov. 1781; she m. 29 Jan. 1823, John Johnson, a brewer, of Brooklyn. No issue.
      2. Miriam Bergen, b. 11 Oct. 1783; she m. 17 Jan. 1810, Anthony Demott, and had two children.
      3. Oldfield Bergen, of Hempstead, farmer and butcher, b. 27 Jan. 1786, d. 22 Nov. 1835. He m. (1) 15 Oct. 1808, Elsy Demott, by whom he had five children, and (2) 2 July 1831, Abigail E. Cornell, of South Hempstead, by whom he had one child.
      4. Aletta Bergen, b. 25 April 1788, d. about 1847. She m. Christopher Loweree, but Bergen does not state whether they had issue.
      5. Jane Bergen b. 4 Jan. 1791, d. 4 Jan. 1795.
      6. John Bergen, b. 8 Oct. 1793, d. (unmarried) 19 May 1848.
      7. James Bergen, a farmer near Brushville, in Hempstead, b. 28 May 1796, d. 9 Feb. 1861. He m. (1) 1823, Naomi Denice, b. 1804, d. June 1828, by whom he had two children, and (2) 9 Feb. 1852, Catharine (____) Fish, widow of Joseph Fish, by whom he had none.
      8. Jane Bergen, b. 18 Sept. 1798. She m. (1) 16 May 1820, Tunis Everett, by whom she had two children, and (2) Amos J. Saxton, by whom she had one son.
      9. Nicholas Bergen, a farmer near Brushville, in Hempstead, b. 10 April 1801, d. 17 July 1846. He m. 22 Dec. 1826, Eliza Flowers, daughter of Willliam Flowers, and had five children.
  2. Adriaentje Blom, said to have been b. 4 May 1724 at Jamaica, bapt. 8 May following with sponsors Baarent Blom and Araentie Hegeman [i.e. Adriaentje Bloetgoet, wife of Hendrick Hegeman], d. at Beekman, N.Y. She m. by 1745, Jacobus/James Burtus,[167] bapt. 4 June 1720 at Jamaica, d. 25 Jan. 1802 at Beekman, son of Jan Burtus, of Hempstead, by the latter’s wife Elizabeth (“Liba”) Snedeker. According to Doherty,
    James Burtis lived at Lake Success on L.I. until he brought his family to Beekman in 1773…. He refused to sign the Association in Beekman and on 21 April 1777 it was reported … that he and two other men informed William Manring that they intended to go off to the enemy…. In 1780 James Burtis was assessed a “Tory” penalty of £15 because he had a son fighting for the enemy. His total estate was valued at £400 at the time and he had to pay the fine within 20 days…. Despite the Loyalist son and his refusal to sign the Association he was awarded Land Bounty Rights for the 5th regiment.
         He probably settled on a 164-acre farm just to the east of Potter’s Corners, across from the farm of Michael Vincent. This was in lot 21 and today is in Union Vale Township. In 1790 he was listed as 2-0-1 and was next to Michael Woolweaver and Israel Tripp. In 1799 he was taced on a house and land that was valued at $2012.50 and personal property worth $78. He was also taxed with Cornelius Hagaman on a house that was worth $137.50. In 1800 he was probably living with his son of the same name and was the man over 45 years.
         James Burtis wrote his will 10 May 1801 and it was proved 15 April 1802. He named his wife Arientje and sons James, Garrett, Barent, and John, and mentioned that he had two daughters but did not name them. The executors were his wife and sons Garrett and James. Enoch Dorland was a witness.
         Known issue, all baptisms in the Jamaica Dutch Church:
    1. Judicke Burtus (erroneously called “Jane” in the LDS Ancestral File), bapt. 17 April 1746 in the Jamaica Dutch Church (as a daughter of “Sem Bortes and Aryantyi [sic] Bortes”), d. 1826 at Unionvale, N.Y. She m. before 1769, Andrew Skidmore, Jr., a miller, b. ca. 1748 at Hempstead, L.I., d. 1816 at Unionvale aforesaid, son of Andrew Skidmore, of Hempstead (in whose 1774 will he is mentioned), by the later‘s wife Abigail ____, and had issue (for whom see Doherty). They were ancestors of Lynn Dielman, of San Diego, California.
    2. Garret Burtus/Burtis, said to have been b. 20 March 1749 at Jamaica, bapt. 26 March 1749 with sponsors Gert [sic] Blom and Malle Blom [the mother’s father and stepmother], d. 1824 in Dutchess Co., N.Y. According to Doherty, who gives a very extensive account of him, he m. 1770 at Oswego, Dutchess Co., N.Y., Mary Dean, daughter of Lawrence and Mary (____) Dean, and had sons Thomas, Barrent, and Gershom.
    3. Elizabeth Burtus, bapt. 29 March 1752 (not 1759 as per IGI) without sponsors. Doherty notes that she possibly m. Elisha Beadle, who is called “my brother-in-law” in the 1803 will of Elizabeth’s brother David. Although she is said in the Ancestral File to have d. 12 Nov. 1830 at Jamaica, having m. Abraham Overhiser, an entry in Doherty, 3:11, suggests that it was rather a male Burtis who m. Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham “Overhisor.”
    4. Barent Burtus/Burtis, said to have been b. 5 Feb. 1755 at Jamaica, bapt. 21 March following,[168] d. 20 Oct 1817, aged 62 years, 8 months, and 17 days (at Hillsdale, Columbia Co., N.Y., according to the Ancestral File), having m. Mary ____, who d. 18 June 1819, aged 63 years, 2 months, and 26 days. According to Doherty, “He was a Loyalist, and his estate was confiscated in 1781. He was no doubt the son for whom the father had to pay the fine. He evidently returned to Beekman and was almost certainly the man mentioned in the Livingston Papers who took over a 125-acre farm in the Clove area 1 March 1791 next to his father…. He was in Beekman in 1790 at 2-2-4…. He was taxed on a house and land in 1799 which was valued at $1092.50. He had personal assets of $74.” Doherty lists four Burtises buried in the same cemetery as he, who were probably his children.
    5. David Burtus, of Beekman and Hillsdale, Columbia Co., N.Y., said to have been b. 1757 at Jamaica, d. between 11 Jan. 1803 (when he made his will) and 18 March 1807 (when it was proved). He m. Elizabeth, “possibly a daughter of Isaac Ketchum.” He was recorded in the 1790 census of Beekman Precinct and taxed there in 1800. According to Doherty “the census records would indicate children,” but none are mentioned in his will, which names only collateral relatives.
    6. John Burtus/Burtis, of Hillsdale, Columbia Co., bapt. 1 Feb. 1760 at Jamaica, d. 1 Jan. 1839 at Stillwater, Saratoga Co., N.Y., and buried in Mechanicville Cemetery. He m. Sarah Bogardus, b. 8 May 1767, probably d. 1820, daughter of Lewis and Annie (Mills) Bogardus. This marriage is said to have occurred 31 May 1787 at Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., but no such marriage is vouched for in the records of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (which in fact do not survive for that year). Doherty cites records which show the presence of this man at Hillsdale in 1802 and 1810. He and his family are treated further in Doherty.
    7. James Burtus, of Beekman Precinct, weaver, said to have been b. 20 Sept. 1762 or 1763 at Hempstead, N.Y., d. 20 Aug. 1810. He m. Nancy (Beadle?), who living 1817. He was taxed in Beekman Precinct in 1799 and 1800, and recorded there in the 1810 census. Doherty shows six children for him.
  3. Elsje Blom, bapt. 4 Nov. 1726 with sponsors Baerent Blom and Femmeite Blom. Possibly she was the Elsye Blom who m. 6 April 1743 in the Flatbush Dutch Church,[169] Philip Ried [i.e. Reid?]. We have found no further trace of this couple, although Bergen mentions that a John and Philip Reid sold 16 acres of land near Brooklyn to Jacob Bergen for $8,000 on 17 Sept. 1817.[170]
  4. Barent Blom, bapt. 27 Sept. 1730 with sponsors Abram Blom and Geertruy Blom. He m. before 1751, Lysbeth ____, and had a son:
    1. Gerrit Blom, bapt. 16 May 1751 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsors Gerret Blom and Malle Blom [i.e. the father’s father and stepmother]; no further record found.

7.   Hendrick4 Hegeman (Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1), of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N.Y., bapt. 27 March 1715 at Jamaica, Queen’s Co., L.I., living 1756. He m. by 1743 (Driggs says in 1740), Catharina De Duytscher, bapt. 7 Feb. 1714, living 1756, daughter of Dirck De Duytscher, of Kingston, by his wife Jannetje Hendrickse Bond.[171] According to Driggs he was the one of this name who m. (2) by New York licence dated 29 May 1758,[172] Eliza[beth] [Taylor?] Vanderburgh; and he was probably also the one who as “Henricus Hegeman, Esq., widower” m. (3?) 2 May 1772 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, by New York licence dated 27 preceding,[173] “Catharina Terbush, widow.” She was Catharina (van Wyck) Ter Boss, said to have been bapt. 5 Aug. 1725, widow of Johannes Ter Boss or Terbush, Jr., of Poughkeepsie, and daughter of Cornelius van Wyck, of Hempstead and Fishkill, by his wife Hannah Thorne.[174]
     We have not seen the pages of Driggs’ Hegeman manuscript relating to this man, and it may be that more decisive evidence regarding him and his family will be found there. “Hendrickus Hegeman and Catrina De Duytsze” appear in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church as baptismal sponsors for Antje, daughter of his brother Isaac Hegeman (no. 8), in 1741, and this is the first record we have discovered of Hendrick Hegeman in the area, as he does appear in the 1740 census of freeholders in Dutchess County. He was appointed a Pender (i.e. pounder?) for Crum Elbow Precinct in the years 1743, 1744, 1745, and 1746, and an overseer of highways in 1757.[175] In Francis Filkin’s account-book (p. 69) he is charged on 15 May 1744 with the purchase of “iron,” so Hendrick was perhaps a smith like his brother Frans.
     Although his second wife is referred to only as “Eliza Vanderbergh” in their marriage licence — which falls during an eight-year gap (1756-64) in the register of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church — the appearance of “Elizabeth Taylor, wife of Henricus Hegeman” in a list of members received in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on 6 March 1766, the same day as the wife of Francis Hegeman (no. 13), alerts us to the possibility that she was known by more than one name, which is somewhat likelier than that her husband could have had yet another wife named Elizabeth, otherwise unattested, in this interval. The discrepancy between the surnames will be accounted for if we surmise that she was the “Elizabeth Talor, young dame, born in Westchester Co. and residing in Dutchess Co.” who had married in March 1746 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Peter van der Burgh, young man, born and residing in Dutchess Co.” Peter van der Burgh (wife not named) baptized children in the Rombout (now Fishkill) Presbyterian Church between 1751 and 1754.[176] Although Peter’s tombstone in the Van Der Burgh Cemetery near Poughkeepsie has suffered considerable damage,[177] he is said in a credible secondary source to have d. 21 Aug. 1755 (apparently having been killed during the French and Indian Wars), which would be compatible with the our chronology.[178]
     The record of our subject’s third marriage in 1772 calls him “Henricus Hegeman, Esq., widower”; we can suggest nothing regarding the identity of Catharina (____) Terbush. He was possibly still alive in 1779, when a Hendrick Hageman was taxed in Rombout Precinct.[179]
     Known issue:

  1. 13 Francis Hegeman, bapt. (as “Frants”) 13 Feb. 1743 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Frank and Aneke Hegemant [the father’s parents].
  2. (perhaps) Isaac Hegeman, of Dutchess Co., b. say 1745. In 1876 a writer to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record posed a question which we do not believe has ever been satisfactorily answered: “Was Col. Isaac Hegaman of Dutchess Co., N.Y., whose daughter Hannah, b. 1783, married Judge William Bailey, descended from Francis Hegaman, who married Ante, dau. of above Henry Filkin?”[180] For reasons given in the account of his possible uncle, Isaac Hegeman (no. 8), we now believe the reference to him as a colonel is incorrect (an error kindly brought to our attention by Prof. John McLeod). We have found no evidence bearing on his parentage, except that he cannot have belonged to the family of Isaac Hegeman (no. 8), who names no sons in his will. Nevertheless, it seems likely that he belongs somehow to this branch of the family. As noted, he is said to have been father of:
    1. Hannah Hegeman, b. say 1765-70, d. before 1805; m. (as his first wife) by 1791, possibly in 1783,[181] Judge William Bailey, of Plattsburgh, brother of senator Theodorus Bailey (1758-1828), and son of Col. John by the latter’s wife Aeljte Van Wyck.[182] Neither of the two writers who discussed this family in the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record in 1876 hinted at any issue other than Catharine Maria Bailey. However, the 1908 Bailey genealogy, which is clearly well-informed, states:
      Judge William Bailey … [originally] of Poughkeepsie, New York … was one of the Associate Justices of the Clinton Common Pleas in 1789 and was appointed first Judge of the County, in 1806, and elected a member of the Assembly in 1803 and again in 1806. By his first wife, Hannah Hagerman, he had two daughters, Catherine, who married Major John Walworth; and Charlotte, who married Captain Myers, both officers of the famous 13th Infantry and who fought in the Battles of 1812- 1814. By his second wife, Phoebe, daughter of Captain Nathaniel Piatt, he had a large family. He bought a wide extent of land at Chateaugay, then a part of Clinton County, supposed to be rich in ore, water power and other attractions, and in 1800 took up his residence there, a veritable life in the wilderness. In 1811 he removed with his growing family to Plattsburgh, where he bought a fine estate which remained in the family until recent years.
      William Bailey’s family by Phoebe Platt included Rear-Admiral Theodorus Bailey (1805-1877), of whom a sketch will be found in the Dictionary of American Biography, as well as at least three others.[183] Known issue:
      1. Catharine Maria Bailey, b. 19 Dec. 1791, bapt. 4 Jan. 1792 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, no sponsors being named in the record, “living at St. Albans, Vt., in 1863.” She m. (as his second wife) m. 31 Dec. 1814, Major John Walworth, an officer in the 13th Regiment of the U.S. Infantry, b. 21 Nov. 1784, at Bozrah or at Norwich, Connecticut, d. 6 Aug. 1839 at New York City, son of Benjamin Walworth and Apphia Hyde.[184] According to the 1864 Hyde genealogy,
        He entered the army of the United States in 1808, as a first lieutenant of infantry. He m. 9 July, 1812, Sarah, the only child of Col. Jonas Simonds of the army of the United States…. At the commencement of the war of 1812, John Walworth was a captain in the sixth regiment of United States infantry, and he distinguished himself in the battles of Little York and of Fort George in Canada. In the first he led the advance, which stormed and took the British battery. And the gallant Gen. Pike, coming up immediately afterwards was killed by his side, and himself was wounded at the same time, by the blowing up of the stone powder magazine. His wife d. 8 Feb., 1813, at Plattsburgh, leaving no issue of this marriage. He then m. 31 Dec, 1814, Catharine Maria Bailey, b. 19 Dec, 1791, daughter of Judge William Bailey of Plattsburgh, and his first wife, Hannah Hagerman, and granddaughter of Col. John Barley and Altie Van Wyck of Poughkeepsie. He was promoted to the rank of major, and at the close of the war of 1812, he left the army and engaged in merchandise at Plattsburgh, and was clerk of the county of Clinton. In 1820, he was an elector of president of the United States. In 1829, he was appointed assistant register of the court of chancery of the state of New York, and held that office until his death. He d. 6 Aug., 1839, at the city of New York. His last wife survived him, and was living at St. Albans, Vt., in 1863.
        Issue (per 1864 Hyde genealogy):
        1. William Bailey Walworth, b. 8 April 1817 at Plattsburgh, d. s.p. in Aug. 1860, at Washington. “He graduated at Columbia college, N.Y., and was a lawyer, but abandoned the profession a year or two after he was licensed to practice. He m. 3 Oct., 1854, Jeanie Gray of Baltimore…. They settled at Washington, D.C., where they were living in 1859. He was then superintendent of House's printing telegraph office at Washington.”
        2. Sarah Simonds Walworth, b. 6 Nov. 1815, at Plattsburgh. She m. 25 Nov. 1847, Samuel Welles Williams, LL.D., b. 21 Sept. 1812. “They were assistant missionaries of the A.B.C.F.M. at Canton in China. He had for some years the charge of the printing establishment of the board, at Canton, and became a proficient in the Chinese and Japanese languages. He wrote a very creditable work on China, in two volumes, entitled The Middle Kingdom, and received the honorary degree of doctor of laws at Union college in 1848. He was interpreter to the expedition to Japan, under Commodore Perry in 1853, and was in 1855, appointed secretary of legation of the United States in China. They were living at Canton in 1861.” They had five children (see the Hyde genealogy for details).
        3. Charlotte Apphia Walworth, b. 17 Aug. 1819, at Plattsburgb. She m. 21 Aug. 1838, Thomas Graham, b. 30 Sept., 1814, at New York. “He was a very promising lawyer, and they settled at New York, where they had been keeping house but a few months when he d. 27 July, 1839, at Stonington, Conn., on his way to Boston on business. She was living at St. Albans, Vt., in 1862, still a widow. They had a posthumous child : Mari/ Thomas, b. 25 Dec, 1839, at New York, m. 6 Sept., 1860, Alexis Emerson Mcllvaine of New York.
        4. Catherine Maria Walworth, b. 12 Dec, 1822, at Plattsburgb. She m. 12 June, 1850, Worthington C. Smith, b. 19 April, 1823, at St. Albans, Vermont. “He was an iron founder at Plattsburgb at the time of their marriage. But they removed to St. Albans, where he became a farmer, and where they were living in 1862.” They had eight children (see the Hyde genealogy for details).
      2. Charlotte Bailey, b. 12 Oct. 1796 at Plattsburgh, d. 15 Feb. 1848 at in New York City, and buried in Vale Cemetery, Schenectady.[185] She m. 22 Jan. 1814 at Poughkeepsie,[186] Capt. (afterwards Major) Mordecai Myers, of the 13th Regiment of the U.S. Infantry, b. 1 May 1776 at Newport, Rhode Island, d. 1870, and buried in the family plot in Vale Cemetery, Schenectady.[187] Issue:[188]
        1. Henrietta Myers; m. Peter S. Hoes, a nephew of President Van Buren. Issue: William Myers Hoes; Pierre Van Buren Hoes.
        2. William Bailey Myers, the eldest son, a lawyer, d. unmarried at Farmington, Illinois.
        3. Catherine Altie Myers, d. unmarried at an advanced age, outliving all her siblings.
        4. Colonel Theodorus Bailey Myers, of New York, b. there 13 Dec. 1821, d. 16th June 1888. He m. 1847, Catalina Juliana Mason, only daughter of Sidney Mason, a retired West Indian merchant, and first U.S. Consul to Puerto Rico, by the latter’s wife Marequita Benito Dorado. Issue: Theodorus Bailey Myers Mason,[189] of the U.S. Navy, who assumed the additional surname of Mason as heir to his maternal grandfather; Cassie Mason Myers (m. Julian James).
        5. Charlotte Bailey Myers; m. Thomas R. Jackson. Issue: Charlotte Louise Jackson; Frances Alice Jackson
        6. Maria Louisa Myers, d. unmarried.
        7. Algernon Sydney Myers; m. Caroline Chappell. Only child: Kate Bailey Myers; m. Robert Traill Spence Lowell, Jr.[190] They were the parents of Robert Traill Spence Lowell III, father of Robert Traill Spence Lowell IV (1917-1977), the poet.
        8. Edward Van Wyck Myers, d. unmarried.
        9. Charles William Myers, d. unmarried.
        10. Frances Myers; m. 27 Oct., 1861, Edgar Marshall Jenkins, of Schenectady, New York, b. 12 Sept. 1836 at New York, son of Edgar Jenkins and Mary Elizabeth Walworth. He was a civil engineer in the employ of the state of New York, on the Erie canal, in 1859, and in 1863 a purser on one of the line of steamers between Panama and San Francisco.[191] There was no issue.
  3. (perhaps) Hendrick Hegeman, b. ca. 25 May 1752, d. 18 Feb. 1811, “aged 58 years, 8 months, 23 days,” and buried in the Hopewell Dutch churchyard, his being the only early stone for anyone of this surname surviving there.[192]
  4. Catharina Hegeman, bapt. 17 July 1756 at Lower Rhinebeck,[193] of whom no further record has been found.

8.   Capt. Isaac4 Hegeman (Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1), of Rombout Precinct (now Fishkill), Dutchess Co., was b. say 1717, and d. between 23 Aug. 1793 (the earliest date at which he could have made his will) and 15 June 1796 (when it was proved).[194] He m. in September 1740 in Dutchess Co. (the ceremony being performed by his mother’s half-brother, Justice Francis Filkin),[195] Neeltje De Graef, living 11 Aug. 1779, daughter of Abraham De Graef, of Poughkeepsie (who is called “my father-in-law Abraham DeGraft” in Isaac’s will), by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Michiel Parmentier.[196]
     Isaac Hegeman appears in all the surviving tax lists for Rombout Precinct between 1742 and 1779.[197] He is debited 1/18/0 in the account-book of Francis Filkin for “one month and five days’ work of my negro George” on 20 May 1742.[198] On 29 Sept. 1746 his “brand iron for horses &c.” was entered in the record-book of the Supervisors and Assessors of Dutchess County.[199] He is said to be mentioned in a deed of 23 Oct. 1747 made by his parents, a statement we have not verified.[200] But in any case his identity is confirmed by other evidence. On 2 February 1745 he and his wife served in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church as baptismal sponsors for his namesake Isaac Harris, son of his sister Catharina, and also for Abraham, son of her sister Neeltje De Graef and the latter’s husband Moses Verveelen (whose surname is mis-written Fiele). Moses Verveelen’s father, Gideon Verveelen (who died between 1755 and 1762), apparently sold land to Isaac Hegeman (or else to a member of the Middagh family who in turn sold it to Isaac Hegeman); for included in the inheritance of the latter’s granddaughter, Neeltje (Duytscher) van der Burgh, was land “in Fishkill town, part, of lot no. 10,” which lot had once belonged in its entirety to Verveelen.[201] On 11 Aug. 1779 “Yzac Hegeman and Neeltje De Graaf” served in the Dutch Church of Albany as baptismal sponsors for Isaac Hegeman Esmay, son of Isaac’s niece Elizabeth (Parmentier) Esmay (no. 10.ix below); this is the last record of Neeltje we have discovered.
     Isaac Hegeman signed the Association test on 15 Aug. 1775,[202] and on 17 October of the same year was commissioned Captain of the 4th Company of the 2nd Regiment of Rombout Precinct militia.[203] Although he must have been around 58 at the time, this is consonant with his own description of himself (see below) as “old” at the time, and his known Loyalist sympathies accord with the fact that Sarah (Dubois) Harris, widow of Isaac’s nephew Capt. Peter Harris (no. 3.i.a), made statements in 1786 that Isaac Hegeman, of Rombout (now Fishkill), farmer, was holding “bonds” for the family to prove that her husband, a Loyalist, had been deprived of lands during the Revolution.[204]
     On 30 April 1777, a William Cook made a deposition to the Committee for Detecting Conspiracies concerning a meeting “to chuse officers in Capt. Hagaman’s Compa[ny],” held “on Barent Van Kleeck’s farm in the evening … to consult about going down to the enemy.” In attendance, it is said, were

Black Barent Van Kleek, & Barent A. Van Kleek, James Middagh, Peter Vandewater Senr., Barent Dutcher, Menecus Muntfort, Francis Laroy tavernkeeper, & James Maxfield … together with Capt. Hagaman, John Palmetier, & his son Francis, John Laroy, Jacob Tobacco, Simeon L. Laroy, John Low, Peter Laroy Jun., Francis Laroy Jun., Hendrick Ostrum, Jacob Rodes, Peter Weaver, Levy Van Kleek, Simeon Van Kleek, Francis Vandewater, Thomas Yeomans (inlisted in the standing Forces), Jacobus Rhineders, & ____ [space left blank] Carpenter, & a son of William Wilsey.

Cook stated that “such of the above persons as did not actually go themselves, did, notwithstanding, advise & persuade the others to go,” and that “Capt. Hagaman said he was too old, otherways he would go himself, but that he intended to get a permission to convey some of the families to New York, and would then get a protection & return home.” Furthermore, Cook added that “almost all of them desired their love might be presented to Capt. Harris [i.e. Peter Harris?].”[205] The following month, Isaac Hegeman was ordered confined to his farm, under the recognizance of a number of neighbors who vouched for him to avoid charges being brought:

Saturday, May 17th, 1777. A Petition was presented to the Board in favour of Capt. Isaac Hagaman, subscribed by James Livingston, Peter Tappen, Richard Lewis, Jonas Kelsey, Jacobus Frear, Henry Hegeman, James Brooks, Robert Hoffman, Abraham Sleght, William Forman, Mynder Van den Bogert, Hugh Van Kleeck, John Frear, Elias Van Bunschoten, Johannis Swartwout, Jacobus Stoutenburgh, Peter Van Kleek, Peter Low, John Van Kleeck, John Baily Junr., John Ringland, John Childs, Joel Duboiss, Matthew Van Bunschoten, Abraham Hoogland, Elias Van Bunschoten, Samuel Dodge, Geleyn Ackerman, [and] Francis Filkins, setting forth “that they have known Capt. Hagaman from the beginning of the Troubles, do believe that he was always in favour of the cause of America, but that he has been deluded or else that he never would have been guilty of so great a crime against his country, that they do assure this Board, that they do all of them really believe, that if Capt. Hagaman will take the oath to the States of America, that he may safely be trusted to go and remain on his farm, and should they find him doing any thing hereafter against his country, they will endeavour to take him & bring him to be punished therefor.”
    Whereas this Board has the highest confidence in the above Petitioners, they being all of them of repute & integrity and approved attachment to the American cause and from their residence in the neighbourhood of said Isaac Hegeman may be presumed to [be] best acquainted with [his] character & conduct and that they would not attempt to impose on this Board in a matter of such importance as the releasement of a person whose going at large might be inconsistent with the safety of State, and whereas this Board conceive it their duty not only to secure offenders that they may be bro’t to punishment but also to pardon all such who convinced of their error are willing to return again to their duty. Resolved therefore that Capt. Hegeman be dismissed upon taking the oath of allegiance to this State and be permitted to return home and remain on his farm until the further order of this Board.
    Capt. Hegeman appearing & taking the oath was dismissed.[206]

On 31 May 1777, it was “resolved that Capt. Isaac Hegeman be discharged from his confinement on his farm.”[207]
     Isaac Hegeman was apparently predeceased by all his children, as his will mentions only his wife Neltie, and various grandchildren: Isaac Hegeman Dutcher, David, Hendrick, John, and Levi Dutcher; Nelly Van De Burgh; Elizabeth Du Bois; Sarah LeRoy; Mary Romar [wife of John Romer]; Lydia Romar [wife of Aris Romer]; and Amelia Hoffman. The executors were Zephaniah Platt [a Magistrate] and John Bailey, and the witnesses Abraham Rynders, John Morey, and John M. Cooke. “Nelly, wife of Peter Van Deburgh, weaver, of Fishkill,” in a deed dated 28 Sept. 1796, mentions having received land from “Isaac Hagam… [illegible] and Nelly, his wife.”[208]
     All of these grandchildren, with the possible exception of Sarah LeRoy, were children of the testator’s daughter Antjen, wife of Barent Duytscher. We had once been tempted to consider as a child of Isaac the Sarah Hegeman who m. 13 March 1766 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Frans P. LeRoy; but as we have not been able to discover a daughter Sarah for her, and as she had four sons who are not included among the grandchildren mentioned in the will, we feel that this is not a persuasive solution to the problem.[209] Subsequent analysis convinces us that she was a daughter of Isaac’s cousin, Hendrick4 (Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman (no. 12).
     Only known child:

  1. 14Antjen Hegeman, bapt. 27 May 1741 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Hendrickus Hegeman and Catrina De Duytsze [the father’s brother and the latter’s his wife].[210]

9.   Frans/Francis4 Hegeman, Jr. (Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1), of Nine Partners Precinct, Dutchess Co., bapt. 12 June 1719 at New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., N.J.,[211] d. (doubtless unmarried and certainly s.p.) between 1 March 1745/6 (when he made his will) and 11 Jan. 1748/9 (when it was proved). The main light thrown on his brief and obscure life comes from the account-book of his mother’s half-brother, Justice Francis Filkin, the Poughkeepsie storekeeper. Between 1742 and 1745 he is credited various amounts for “shoeing my stalion … mending a chain … putting two of my shoes under my horse … mending a scythe … shoeing two horses,” and for “work done to a wagon,” amongst other things. In turn, he was billed for “sundries” including 8 yards of linen and 5 gallons of rum.[212] The local historian Helen Reynolds, commenting on this and other similar passages in this record, notes:

Iron used at Poughkeepsie was obtained both from the iron mines on the Manor of Livingston and from New York…. The smiths did not merely shoe horses. They made and mended a great assortment of farm tools and household utensils of which iron formed a part and they produced small articles like locks.[213]

His will, dated as noted above, in which he calls himself “Francis Hagaman, Jr., blacksmith,” seems to have left his estate to his parents.[214]

10.   Adriaentje4 Hegeman (Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) was b. say 1720, and living 1778. She m. (1) before 1738, Michiel Parmentier, living 1768, bapt. 6 May 1711 in the Kingston Dutch Church, said to have d. 1773, brother of Tryntje Parmentier (wife of Adriaentje’s half-uncle, Isaac Filkin), and son of Pieter Parmentier by the latter’s first wife, Sara van Kleeck.[215] As Arriaantje Palmentier, widow, she m. (2) 8 Feb. 1774 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Cornelius Viele[216] (called “Fielen” in the record, a widower, perhaps identical with the Cornelis baptized 11 June 1718 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, son of Pieter Vielen and Johanna [Myndertse] van den Bogaard.[217]
     Adriaentje’s parentage was correctly surmised by Driggs on the basis of her children’s baptismal sponsorships. As “Machiel Parmentier” and “Ariaentje Heegman” she and her first husband served as baptismal sponsors in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church in 1741 for a child of “Julius” (recte James?) Achmoedy and his wife Maria Deyo, and as “Michael Palmatier and Ariaantje Hegeman” they served in the same capacity in the same place for the twin daughters of their daughter Helena in 1768.
     Some account of Michiel Parmentier and Adriaentje Hegeman is given in Prentiss Glazier, Palmatier-Parmentier Family of Dutchess County (1976).[218] Despite a lack of documentation, Glazier’s work appears to provide authentic information, and we have quoted from it where relevant. After the present section of these notes was written, we learned of the extensive Parmentier database by Theresa Gaskell,[219] in light of which it now seems unnecessary to attempt any further revision of our work, apart from the ongoing correction of actual errors.
     Little has been discovered of Adriaentje’s life after her second marriage. As Cornelius Veele and Arriaantje Hageman, she and her husband served on 26 May 1777 in the Albany Dutch Church as baptismal sponsors for a child of Simeon Viele and Neeltje Parmentier, the latter being presumably Adriaentje’s daughter, below; and as Cornelis Fiele and Arjaantje Palmatier, they served in the same capacity on 20 April 1778 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church for a child of Myndert Fiele and Hanna Palmatier.
     Issue, mainly per the family bible record (which however strangely misses the three eldest children):[220]

  1. Antjen Parmentier, bapt. 21 May 1738 in the Kingston Dutch Church, with sponsors Frans and Antjen Hegeman. Glazier states that she m. “about 1757,” Peter van de Bogart, a claim elaborated more fully in his 1974 Van de Bogart genealogy, but with inadequate discussion of the evidence.[221]
  2. Sara Parmentier, bapt. (as “Zara”) 17 May 1739 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Isak Vilkins [i.e. Isaac Filkin, half-brother of Antjen Rouard], and Treyntjen Parmentier [his wife]. As “Sarah Palmatier” she m. 25 April 1767 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Petrus Freer, a widower, doubtless the one who had m. there on 23 May 1750, Marietje Westerfeld, at which time he was called “of De Pals [i.e. The Paltz], widower of Kornelia Oostrum,” thus identifying him with the Petrus Freer, “born at De Palts,” who m. there 5 Feb. 1746, Cornelia Oostrom. A nineteenth-century memoir of the Freer family identifies the husband of Cornelia Oostrom and Marritje Westerveld as the son, bapt. 2 June 1723 at Kingston, of Simon Freer and Marritje van Bommel, but offers no hint that he may have been married for a third time,[222] while Heidgerd’s fuller 1968 Freer genealogy agrees as to his parentage and, we are happy to say, supports our conclusion as to his marriages, at which we had arrived before seeing it.[223] Petrus Freer and Sara Parmentier are attested at Poughkeepsie in 1769-70, at Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y., in 1775-78, and at Linlithgo in 1780, by the baptismal records of their children. Known issue, mainly per the 1968 Freer genealogy:
    1. Sarah Freer, b. bapt. 19 April 1769 in the Poughkeepsie Church (per Freer genealogy, but no original records survive for April 1769); d. young.
    2. Sara Freer, bapt. 11 Feb. 1770 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Thomas Eszmie and Elizabeth Palmetier [the mother’s sister]. She m. by 1785, Cornelius van de Bogart (or Vandebogart), b. about 1767, perhaps a son of Peter van de Boagrt and Elizabeth Tietsort. They lived at Livingston, N.Y. Issue, per Freer genealogy:
      1. Sarah Vandebogart, bapt. 13 Nov. 1785.
      2. Jane Vandebogart, bapt. 23 Oct. 1788 at Marbletown.
      3. Petrus Vandebogart, bapt. 7 Jan. 1790 at Linlithgo.
      4. Cornelius Vandebogart, bapt. 8 May 1791 at Marbletown.
      5. Mary Vandebogart, bapt. 10 April 1793.
    3. Johannes Freer, bapt. 8 Jan. 1775 at Germantown. He m. 18 Dec. 1797 at Linlithgo, Eva Simmons, bapt. 8 March 1778 in the Livingston Lutheran Church, daughter of Jacob Simmons and Anna Pulver. Issue, per Freer genealogy:
      1. Sally Freer, bapt. 19 July 1798 in Livingston Lutheran Church.
      2. Adriantje Freer, bapt. 27 April 1801.
    4. Frans Freer (twin to Jacobus), bapt. 22 Feb. 1778 at Germantown; no further record found.
    5. Jacobus Freer or Frayer (twin to Frans), bapt. 22 Feb. 1778 at Germantown. He m. 22 April 1798 at Linlithgo, Leah Martin, b. 1781, d. 20 Dec. 1864, aged 83 years, and buried in Prattsville Cemetery. Issue, per Freer genealogy:
      1. John Frayer, bapt. 2 Feb. 1800 at Prattsville.
      2. Jane E. Frayer, bapt. 8 May 1806.
      3. Peter Palmateer Frayer, b. 25 Sept. 1808; his line is traced further in the Freer genealogy.
      4. Jacob Michlan Frayer, bapt. 21 May 1813 at Prattsville.
      5. Mary Ann Frayer, bapt. 27 April 1815; m. 11 Aug. 1835, Joseph Reynolds, of Delhi.
      6. Frederick Martin Frayer, bapt. 30 Jan. 1816 at Prattsville; his line is traced further in the Freer genealogy.
      7. (possibly) James Frayer, b. about 1824 at Prattsville; his line is traced further in the Freer genealogy.
    6. Ariantje Freer, bapt. 15 April 1780 at Linlithgo. She apparently m. 17 Nov. 1797, David Minkler, of Schoharie. Issue, per Freer genealogy:
      1. Jacob Minkler, bapt. 21 April 1798 at Linlithgo.
      2. David Minkler, bapt. 20 April 1802.
      3. Johannes Minkler, bapt. 2 March 1807 at Nassau.
      4. Elizabeth Minkler, bapt. 23 Aug. 1809 at Schoharie.
      5. Gretchen Minkler, bapt. 5 June 1814.
      6. Jacobus Minkler, bapt. 18 Jan. 1817.
  3. Tryntjen Parmentier, bapt. 7 Oct. 1740 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Joseph Herris and Catrina Hegeman [no. 3.i]. Glazier states, without citing evidence, that she “probably d. Oct. 2, 1814, unmarried.”
  4. Pieter Palmatier, b. 1742, bapt. (as “Petrus”) 31 Aug. 1742 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Pieter Palmentier, Sara Palmentier. He m. before 1767, Sara Swartwout, whom Glazier stated to be probably a daughter of Abrahm Swartwout and Tryntje Van Kleeck. His identity is corroborated by the naming of their eldest son Michael, and by their appearance as sponsors for a child of Pieter’s sister Elizabeth (Parmentier) Esmay at Albany in 1775. Their own known children, all baptisms being in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church unless otherwise stated, were:
    1. (perhaps) Adriaentje Palmatier, who m. by 1783, Hugo A. Van Kleeck, a widower, son of Asahuaerus Van Kleeck and Jannetje Freer.[224] Glazier’s suggestion to place her here seems plausible, as she named her second son Petrus and second daughter Sara. Unfortunately, not one of their children’s baptismal names any sponsors, which might have provided a useful clue. They had: Jannetje, b. 27 Aug. 1783, bapt. 14 Sept. following at Poughkeepsie; Sara, b. 8 Nov. 1784, bapt. 12 Dec. following at Poughkeepsie; Asahuerus Hugo, b. 25 Oct. 1786, bapt. 17 Dec. following at New Hackensack; Petrus, b. 4 Oct. 1788, bapt. 2 Nov. following at New Hackensack; Simeon, b. 8 Dec. 1790, bapt. 9 Jan. 1791 at Poughkeepsie; Stephen, b. 25 May 1793, bapt. 24 July following at Poughkeepsie.
    2. Antje Palmatier, bapt. 19 July 1767 with sponsors Pieter van de Bogert and Antje Palmetier. Glazier says she m. James Wiltsee.
    3. Sara Palmatier, b. 19 April 1769, bapt. 4 June following with sponsors Petrus Freer and Sara Palmetier. Glazier thinks she was the one of this name who m. 26 Nov. 1786 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church, Matthew Buys, both parties being described as “of Poughkeepsie.”
    4. Michael Palmatier, b. 19 Oct. 1770, bapt. 4 Nov. following (no sponsors named in record). Glazier says he m. Hannah Carman.
    5. Abraham Palmatier, bapt. 30 July 1775 with sponsors Abraham Swartwout and Mary North. Glazier says he m. Elizabeth ____, and resided at Middleburg, Schoharie Co.
    6. Helena Palmatier, b. 13 Nov. 1777, bapt. 4 Jan. 1778 with sponsors Barent van Kleek and Helena his wife. Glazier says she m. John Livingston. We have not been able to identify such a marriage in the 1910 Livingston genealogy.[225]
    7. Maria Palmatier, b. 28 Nov. 1779, bapt. 11 March 1780 (no sponsors named in record).
    8. Elizabeth Palmatier, bapt. 26 May 1782 with sponsors Thomas Esme and Elizabeth Esme. Glazier states that she m. Jacob Borst, and lived at Middleburg, Schoharie Co.
    9. Johanna Palmatier, b. 28 Aug. 1785, bapt. 20 Nov. following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church; no sponsors named.
    10. (perhaps) George Washington Palmatier, said by Glazier to have been bapt. 20 Dec. 1787, but he gives no place, and no such record has been found at Poughkeepsie or at New Hakensack.
  5. Helena Parmentier, b. 23 July 1744 (according to the family bible record) at Poughkeepsie (according to her marriage record), bapt. (as “Lena”) 2 Feb. 1745 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Myn[d]ardt Palmatier, Lena Parmentier. The baptismal sponsorships of her children prove that she was the one of this name who m. 17 Feb. 1765 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Abraham Bartlett (often called Bartley or Bertley in Dutch records), “born at Beekman’s Precinct and living at Poughkeepsie,” bapt. 19 Sept. 1742 in the Fishkill Dutch Church, said to have d. ca. 1790 at Unionville, Albany Co., N.Y., son of Benjamin Bartlett, of Oswego and Poughkeepsie, by the latter’s wife Neeltje Buys.[226] For further details of them and their children, see Doherty. Known issue, all baptisms in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church:
    1. (probably) Benjamin Bartlett, b. say 1766 or early 1767, who m. Elizabeth Esmay (see no. 10.ix.a below); if so, his wife was his first cousin. The generally excellent account of this family in Doherty gives only a rather tentative and unsatisfactory discussion of this man. While admitting that “DAR [membership application no.] 579932 claims he m. Elizabeth Esmay,” he concludes that Benjamin “would have to have been born before 1774 or so because Benjamin Bartlett and Elizabeth Esmay had a son b. 1794 [hence] we believe that … the man who married Elizabeth Esmay … [was] Benjamin, son of Benjamin [Sr.],” that is, our Abraham’s father. However, under his account of Benjamin Sr. he shows the supposed son Benjamin with a question mark beside his name. Doherty does not summon any evidence to support the existence of two distinct Benjamins beyond Benjamin Sr. He also does not state why he believes Abraham Bartlett and Helena Parmentier could not have been the father of a man who (as will appear under our account of his wife below) was married in 1792. There is no chronological difficulty with Benjamin’s having been born some time between the spring of 1766 and the spring of 1767, and it would not be surprising if Abraham named his eldest child Benjamin, after his father. Doherty’s hypothesis that the Benjamin married in 1792 was a son of Benjamin Bartlett and Neeltje Buys fares badly when we consider that on his own showing, Neeltje was baptized in 1708, and married before 1730. It is unlikely she had a son married some 62 years after herself. Nevertheless, considering the remaining uncertainty surrounding Benjamin’s parentage, we shall only continue our treatment of him under our account of his wife, below.
    2. Adriaentje Bartlett (twin), b. 22 Nov. 1768, bapt. 26 Dec. following with sponsors Michael Palmatier and Ariaantje Hegeman.
    3. Neeltje Bartlett (twin), b. 22 Nov. 1768.
    4. Michael Bartlett, b. 28 Dec. 1770, bapt. 7 Feb. 1771 with no sponsors.
    5. Abraham Bartlett, Jr., b. 2 Jan. 1773, bapt. 31 Jan. following with no sponsors.
    6. Cornelius Bartlett, b. 15 Feb. 1775, bapt. 21 May following with no sponsors. He m. Catherine Shutter, by whom he had eight children, including Mary Magdalene Bartlett, wife of Ephraim Hallenbeck, and great-grandmother of Mrs. Muriel (Albright) Frincke.
    7. Sara Bartlett, b. 14 Dec. 1778, bapt. 24 Jan. 1779 with no sponsors.
    8. Antje Bartlett, b. 24 July 1782; no baptism found.
  6. “Frances” Parmentier (as the name is written in the family bible record), b. 10 June 1746. Remembering that in this period the spellings Francis and Frances were still interchangeable and had no significance whatever with respect to gender, we suspect the child was in fact male, or else his parents would not have named any son after his mother’s father. We thus agree with Glazier in identifying this child with the male Francis Parmentier who m. 13 June [or Jan.?] 1772 at Germantown, Alida Freer. This theory receives strong support from the fact that this couple’s eldest son and a daughter were named Michael and Adriantje, and, we believe, effectively refutes the statement in the usually reliable 1968 Freer genealogy that he was the son b. 29 Nov. 1755 at Poughkeepsie, son of John Palmatier and Blandina LeRoy.[227]
         As to the question of his wife’s parentage, the fact that her second son was named Petrus suggests it may have been her father’s name. Glazier’s statement that she was a daughter of Hugo Freer and Maria DeWitt is not supported by the onomastic evidence, and the statement in the Freer genealogy that she was Lydia Freer, b. 17 July 1758, daughter of daughter of Abraham Freer and Jannetje Hetschel, would make her scarcely 14 years of age at the birth of her eldest child, which is exceedingly unlikely.
         We take our record of this couple’s issue from Glazier, who extends some of the lines further:
    1. Michael Palmatier, bapt. 22 Aug. 1772 at Linlithgo.
    2. Peter Palmatier, bapt. 26 Jan. 1774 at Linlithgo.
    3. Sara Palmatier, b. ca. 1775.
    4. John Palmatier, bapt. 8 June 1777 at Linlithgo.
    5. Simeon Palmatier, bapt. 18 Feb. 1781 at Linlithgo.
    6. Ariantje Palmatier, said to have been b. 3 Aug. 1783.
    7. Frans Palmatier, bapt. 17 June 1878 at Lilithgo.
    8. (perhaps) Casparus Palmatier.
  7. John Parmentier, b. 5 March 1748. Glazier states that he was of New Scotland and Catskill, N.Y., m. 8 Oct. 1768 at Poughkeepsie, Catharine Kip, and had issue: Elizabeth, Henry, Sara, Michael, John Jr., Susan, Arian, Tryntje, Maria, Stephen, Elizabeth, and Peter. According to Muriel Frincke, they baptized children in the Jerusalem Church. We do not have access to the materials required to give a proper account of this family.
  8. Henry Parmentier, b. 12 June 1750. Glazier states that he m. about 1773, Elizabeth Lescher, and had issue: Arian, Bastian, Michael, and Henry Jr. Muriel Frincke informs us that he baptized two children in the Gilead Lutheran Church at Brunswick, N.Y. We do not have access to the materials required to give a proper account of this family.
  9. Elizabeth Parmentier, b. 28 Jan. 1752, living 1790. She m. 8 June 1771 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Lt. Thomas Esmay, said to have d. 1820. Their marriage record refers to her as “Elizabeth Palmentier, born and living in Poughkeepsie” and him as “Thomas Esmie, born in Rumbouts Precinct.” As “Thomas Esme and Elizabeth Esme” they served in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church as baptismal sponsors for Elizabeth, daughter of her brother Peter Palmatier, in 1782. Some account of this family is given on the website of James Romans.[228] Known issue:
    1. Elizabeth Esmay, b. say 1772, living 1796. She m. 14 June 1792 in Unionville Church, Albany (IGI), Benjamin Bartlett, probably a son of Abraham Bartlett and Elizabeth’s, whose parentge we have already discussed under no. 10.v.a above. Benjamin Bartlett took a lease on 172 acres in Rensselaer Manor on 14 June 1792.[229] For a full listing of their family see the website of James Romans. Their issue included:
      1. Neeltje Bartlett, bapt. 11 Nov. 1794 in Unionville Church, Albany Co., with sponsors Thomas Esmay and Elizabeth Palmatier,[230] d. by 1796, when another daughter was given the same name.
      2. Neeltje Bartlett, bapt. 20 Oct. 1796 in the Helderbergh Dutch Church, Guilderland, N.Y., also with sponsors Thomas Esmay and Elizabeth Palmetier.
    2. Peter Esmay, b. 24 May 1775, bapt. 9 July following in the Albany Dutch Church, with sponsors Pieter Palmatier and Sara Swartwoud. He m. by 1798, Maria Whitaker, and they had issue:
      1. Thomas Esmay, b. 26 Nov. 1798, and bapt. 23 Dec. following in the Helderbergh Duch Church, with sponsors Thomas Esmay and Elizabeth “Palmer” (recte Palmentier). This is presumably the Thomas P. Esmay who m. 13 Jan. 1823 in the First Presbyterian Church, Albany (IGI), Mary L. Lewis.
      2. Mary Esmay, bapt. 30 March 1807 in the New Rhinebeck-Cobleskill German Reformed Church, Schoharie, N.Y. (IGI)
    3. Isaac Hegeman Esmay, b. 4 July 1779 and baptized (as “Yzac Hegeman Esmy”) 11 Aug. following in the Albany Dutch Church, with sponsors Yzac Hegeman and Neeltje De Graaf, living 1816. He m. by 1804, Margaret L. Parsons, and had issue:
      1. Joseph I. Esmay, said to have been b. 7 Oct. 1802 (IGI), bapt. 16 Dec. 1804 in the German Reformed Church, New Rhinebeck-Cobleskill, Schoharie Co., N.Y. (IGI). He m. before 1826, Magdalena Hallenback, and had issue (all according to patron’s submission records in IGI): David, b. 25 April 1826; Aaron, b. 1837; Anna Elisa, b. 6 Dec. 1843; Jedediah, b. 1844; Isaac, b. 1849; Lynda, b. 1852; Marcia, b. 1857
      2. Isaac Esmay, bapt. 5 June 1808 in the German Reformed Church, New Rhinebeck-Cobleskill (IGI).
      3. Peter Esmay, b. 29 March 1810 in Seward Tp., Schoharie Co., N.Y. (IGI), bapt. 20 May following in the German Reformed Church, New Rhinebeck-Cobleskill (IGI).
      4. Moses Parsons Esmay, b. 26 Oct 1816 in Seward Tp. (IGI). He m. 19 Dec. 1839 (IGI), Jane Maria Winne. Known issue (per IGI): Margaret, b. 2 July 1849.
    4. Frans Esmay, said to have been b. 2 April 1782; m. by 1807, Mary Vanderverker, said to have been b. 18 June 1784. They had a son:
      1. Thomas Esmay, b. 25 Dec. 1807, who m. 13 Jan. 1828 at Fretown, Cortland Co., N.Y., Mariah Elizabeth Marikle.[231] They were parents of Francis Thomas Esmay, b. 14 Nov. 1829, d. 28 Jan. 1899, who m. Nancy Seeber, and had issue.
    5. Michael Esmay, b. 19 Oct. 1784, and bapt. 23 Jan. 1785 in the Gilead Evangelical Lutheran Church, Center Brunswick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. (per IGI).
    6. Anna Esmay, b. 27 March 1790, bapt. 9 May 1790 in the Gilead Evangelical Lutheran Church, aforesaid (per IGI).
    7. (according to James Romans) John Esmay (order uncertain).
    8. (according to James Romans) Eleanor Esmay (order uncertain). Could she have been the one of this name who m. 2 Sept. 1793 in the First Dutch Reformed Church, Albany (IGI), Hans Seger?
  10. Neeltje (“Nellie”) Parmentier, b. 10 May 1754. She is almost certainly the Naltje Palmontere who m. 20 Jan. 1775 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, her step-brother, Simeon Viele, son of the Cornelius Viele by his first wife ________. His identity is corroborated by the naming of their eldest son Cornelius. Simeon Viele and his family are briefly noted in a nineteenth-century historical compendium,[232] but no connection is there drawn between him and others of this surname. Glazier lists seven children for them with no citation of evidence; we have found proof only for the following:
    1. Cornelius Viele, b. 30 April 1777, bapt. 26 May following in the Albany Dutch Church, as a son of Simeon Veele and Neeltje Palmatier, with sponsors Cornelius Veele and Arriaantje Hageman.[233]
    2. Adriaentje Viele, b. 12 June 1779, bapt. (as “Arrizantje”) 11 Aug. following in the Albany Dutch Church, as a daughter of Simon [sic] Viele and Neeltje Palmetier, with sponsors Reinert Viele and Annatje Palmetier.[234]
  11. Maria Parmentier, b. 24 June 1756. Glazier claims that she m. John Schermerhorn, Jr., of Livingston, N.Y., and had ten children.
  12. Johannah Parmentier, b. 7 May 1759, living 1793. She m. 26 Sept. 1777 (not 1776 as stated in Glazier’s Parmentier genealogy) in the New Hackensack Dutch Church, Myndert Viele, living 1793. Hence their first child was born less than seven months later. Glazier says he was her step-brother, hence a son of Cornelius Viele.[235] who were married in or near Poughkeepsie in December 1740,[236] and were still alive on 1 Oct. 1769, when they served as baptismal sponsors in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church.[237] Glazier’s Parmentier genealogy credits this couple with twelve children, but we have found evidence only of the following:
    1. Ariantje Viele, b. 1 April 1778, bapt. 20 April following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, with sponsors Cornelius Fiele and Ariantje Palmatier. Despite her extreme youth at the time, it seems likely she was the one of this name who m. 12 Jan. 1794, Elias S. Freer, b. 19 Feb. 1771, bapt. 17 March following, son of Simeon Freer and Anna M. DuBois (and nephew of the Gideon Dubois who married Elizabeth Duytscher),[238] and had the following issue, all baptized in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church but with no sponsors named:
      1. Maria Freer, b. 6 July 1795, bapt. 6 Sept. following.
      2. Myndert Freer, b. 16 Aug. 1797, bapt. 27 Aug. following, d. 24 June 1830 (Dutchess Surrogate Court records). According to the Freer genealogy he m. 21 Dec. 1820 at Poughkeepsie, Eliza Churchill, and had issue: George A.; Charles; Harriet E.
      3. Johannes Freer, b. 10 Oct. 1799, bapt. 19 Jan. 1800.
    2. Rachael Viele, b. 9 Oct. 1780, bapt. 19 Nov. following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church, with sponsors Jan van Kleeck and Jannetje Viele, “his wife.”
    3. Jannetje Viele (twin), b. 24 Nov. 1782 and bapt. 22 Dec. 1782 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, with sponsors Simeon J. Freer and Seletje Freer.
    4. Selitje Viele (twin), b. 24 Nov. 1782 and bapt. at the same time and with the same sponsors as her sister Jannetje.
    5. Cornelis Viele, bapt. 27 Aug. 1784 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church, without sponsors.
    6. Michiel Viele, b. 27 Aug. 1786 and bapt. 10 Sept. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church.
    7. Maria Viele, b. 11 Oct. 1788, bapt. 2 Nov. following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church.
    8. Antie Viele, b. 9 Feb. 1791, bapt. 27 Feb. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, d. 12 May 1857, aged 66 years. She m. 24 Oct. 1808 in the New Paltz Dutch Church, Josiah Hasbrouck, b. 8 Aug. 1781, bapt. 26 Aug. following, son of Isaiah Hasbrouck, of New Paltz, by the latter’s wife Maria Bevier. He is said to have served in the War of 1812. They “moved from New Paltz to Sullivan Co. by 1831.” According to a Hasbrouck genealogy (which is not especially accurate in the matter of dates), they had issue:[239]
      1. Abraham Bevier Hasbrouck, b. 1809.
      2. Maria Hasbrouck, b. 1811.
      3. Ezekiel Hasbrouck, b. 1814.
      4. William Hasbrouck, b. 1817.
      5. Catharine Hasbrouck, b. 1818.
      6. William Hasbrouck, b. 1821.
      7. Jacob Hasbrouck, b. 1823.
      8. Josiah Hasbrouck, b. 1825.
      9. Margaret Hasbrouck, b. 1826.
      10. Benjamin B. Hasbrouck, b. 1830.
      11. Elizabeth Hasbrouck.
      12. Isaiah Hasbrouck.
    9. Petrus Viele, b. 9 May 1793, bapt. 2 June following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, without sponsors.
  13. Selitje Parmentier (called “Sixley” in the family bible record), b. 15 June 1762, living 1787. She m. 4 July 1782 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Simeon J. Freer, b. 26 Feb. 1760 at Poughkeepsie, d. 29 Dec. 1814 in Albany Co., and buried in the Frear burial ground, Poughkeepsie,[240] although the stated age of death of 51 years, 10 months, and 10 days is erroneous. He was a son of Jacobus Freer, of Poughkeepsie, by the latter’s wife Antoinetta Lewis.[241] As “Simeon J. Freer and Seletje Freer” they appear as sponsors at the baptism of a child of her sister Johanna in 1782. A “Simeon J. Frere and wife [not named]” sold land in the town of Fishkill in 1794.[242] Known issue:
    1. Ariantje Freer, b. 17 Sept. 1782, and bapt. 6 Oct. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, d. 1842. She m. 28 Feb 1799 at New Salem, N.Y., Peter Simmons, b. 1776. They had nine children: Selitje, Peter, Simeon, Catherine, Anne E., Emeline (1810), Mary Ann (1815), Rachel, and Harriet.[243] Through their daughter Selitje (“Sicily”) Simmons, wife of Isaac Albright, they were ancestors of Mrs. Muriel (Albright) Frincke.
    2. Michael Freer or Fraer, b. 1785, d. 1842. He m. Catharine Gee. According to the 1968 Freer genealogy, “He emigrated to Michigan in the 1850s and settled near Grass Lake. Travelling by wagon train through Ontario, they were detained by hostile Indians who had contracted typhoid fever from preceding trains and were at the point of massacring the train, but decided to give them a chance to cure the plague. Now James, Michael’s son, was a horse doctor and familiar with herbs and roots, and he attempted to doctor the Indians back to health. Probably due more to the disease having run its course than to his ministrations, they were restored to health and the party was allowed to continue its journey.”[244] Issue, per Freer genealogy:
      1. James H. Fraer, b. 1805 in Steben County, d. 3 Sept. 1869 at Grass Lake, Michigan. He m. in arren Co., Pa., Clarissa Shaffer, b. 1814, d. 25 Feb. 1875, daughter of ____ Shaffer and Elizabeth Dow. He was a farmer; the Freer genealogy lists seven children for them.
      2. Sarah Fraer, b. 23 March 1809 in Onondaga Co., living 1880. She m. 8 Nov. 1825, Daneil Woodward, b. 4 Nov. 1804, d. 17 Oct. 1876, and buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Waterloo, Michigan. They lived at Simcoe, Ontario, for a time, then in 1841 moved to Michigan. The Freer genealogy lists two children for them.
    3. Peter Freer, b. 13 May 1787 and bapt. 17 June following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (without sponsors), the record erroneously giving the mother’s name as Lena Palmatier; d. 1842. Although we have not seen the evidence, he has generally been identified with the Peter Freer or Frear who m. Catharine Trumpbour (daughter of Valentin Fiero Trumpbour by the latter’s first wife Neeltje Elich or Eligh) and, had a daughter Margaret, b. 1818, d. 1 Oct. 1876, who m. her first cousin, Peter Freer Whitney, son of James Whitney and Sara Trumpbour.[245]
  14. Isaac Parmentier/Palmatier, b. 21 June 1765. He was presumably (per Glazier) the Isaac Hegeman Palmatier, d. 26 Oct. 1828, who m. before 1792, Sarah van Kleeck, d. 4 June 1828, daughter of Lawrence Van Kleeck and Jannetje De Graef.[246] Glazier suggests he was the Isaac Parmentier in the 1790 census of Poughkeepsie, and “probably a patriot in [the] Revolution … pension file #S 43784 may be applicable to him.” This couple had the following issue:
    1. Petrus Palmatier, b. 31 Jan. 1787, bapt. 11 March following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church, without sponsors. Glazier says he m. Susan Kip.
    2. Jean [i.e. Jannetje?] Palmatier, b. 20 Aug. 1792, bapt. 23 Sept. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, without sponsors. Glazier says she m. John Hughsted.
    3. Adriaentje Palmatier, b. 13 Jan. 1799, bapt. (as “Arrenatje”) 17 March following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church. Glazier says she m. Gilbert Manning.
    4. Laurence Palmatier, b. 1 July 1802, bapt. 19 Sept. following inthe Poughkeepsie Dutch Church. Glazier says he m. Mary Manning.

11.   Jan/John4 Hegeman (Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1),[247] of Dutchess Co., bapt. 1 April 1716 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, living 1770 (when he is mentioned in his mother’s will). He m. (1) by 1739, Jannetje Bergen, bapt. 10 July 1715 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, living 7 May 1741 (when her second child was baptized) but d. before 8 Oct. 1755, sister of the Sara Bergen who m. Joseph Hegeman (no. 4.v) and of the Derrick Bergen who m. Femmetje Blom (no. 6.i), and daughter of Teunis Bergen, of Jamaica, by his wife Marritje Woertman.[248] He m. (2) by 1758, Mary ____ [perhaps Remsen]. A deed cited by Driggs indicates that “John Hegeman, weaver” joined with Hendrick Hegeman (his brother) and Hendrick Lott (his brother-in-law) to purchase land in the Nine Partners Patent in 1739, and it is evident that he actually went there, as his first wife’s father, Teunis Bergen, in his will dated 8 Oct. 1755 and proved 24 Feb. 1756, remembers “the children of my daughter Jannettie, late wife of John Hegeman, of the Nine Partners, in Dutchess County.”[249] It therefore seems reasonable to suppose that he is the John Hegeman who was taxed in Crum Elbow Precinct between 1740 and 1768, and was chosen an Overseer of Highways in 1746.[250] The next record we have of him is on 22 Aug. 1756, when “Tunis, son of John Hegeman” was baptized in the Presbyterian Church of Rumbout and Poughkeepsie, with no mention of the mother’s name. Finally, we know that John Hegeman had married again by 1770, as his mother’s will refers to “children of John Hegeman by his first wife”; and this accords with the appearance of a John and Mary Hageman, of Crum Elbow, in a 1758 sale of land in Lot 8 to William Beekman, and of a John and Mary Hageman in a 1760 sale of further land in lot 8 to Henry Ostrom.[251] It would be tempting to try to place Maria in the Ostrom family, but the Ostroms who figure in NYGBR 40:191-93, 249-253, and who seemingly include most of the Dutchess County branch of the family, include no Maria Ostrom of a really plausible age. The last record we can be definitely attached to this John Hegeman is the mention of him in his mother’s 1770 will, but he is possibly also the John Hegeman who signed the Oath of Allegiance in Beekman Precinct in 1775.[252]
     It is an open question whether his son Tunis was by the first wife or the second. Favoring the former possibility is the presumption that the child was named for the first wife’s father, and the fact that its baptism followed her death by at least ten months would not represent an inordinate delay by the standards of eighteenth-century New York. Favoring the latter possibility, however, is the extensive gap which exists between Tunis’ birth and the birthdates (whether known or estimated) of the older children. Unfortunately, the dates of the death of the first wife and of John Hegeman’s subsequent remarriage cannot be estimated with sufficient precision.
     Known issue:

(by first wife)

  1. Sara Hegeman, bapt. 9 Dec. 1739 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsors Joosep Hegeman and Saara Hegeman. She m. 13 Oct. 1763 in the Presbyterian Church of Rombout (now Fishkill), John Clements.
  2. Joseph Hegeman, bapt. 7 May 1741 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsors Jooseph Hegeman [Jr.] and Saara Hegeman.
  3. (probably) John Hegeman/Hagerman,[253] b. say 1747, d. 1813 at Elizabethtown, Leeds Co., Upper Canada. His proposed identification, which is favored by onomastic evidence, is based on a family tradition that he was a brother of Tunis Hagerman, below. Like the latter he was a Loyalist, probably being the John Hegeman of Beekman’s Precinct who refused to sign the Association Test in July 1775, and the Johannis Hageman whose name was subsequently entered in a list of “Persons late of Rumbout Precinct gone to the Enemy.”[254] There are a number of mentions in military service records of a John or Johannes Hegeman, but we will not venture here to extricate his record from that of his presumed brother-in-law, Johannes Hegeman, below. At the close of the war he went to Upper Canada, drawing 600 acres in Elizabeth Tp., now in Leeds Co., as a Loyalist, his land consisting of what is now lot 23 of the third concession.[255] He m. before 1771, Phoebe Ferguson, by whom he had nine children, including ones named John, Jane, and Tunis.
  4. (perhaps) Jannetje Hegeman, b. say 1753, for whom we have not discovered any direct evidence of her parentage. She m. (1) 15 Jan. 1774 in the Hopewell Dutch Church, Dutchess Co., Johannes Hegeman, the marriage record calling him “of Rombout.” He was pretty surely a son of Cornelius Hegeman, of Fishkill, and Maria Wiltsie, who were baptizing children there in the 1740s; this Cornelius was a son of Adriaen3 (Denys2, Adriaen1) Hegeman.[256] They had a son, Cornelius, b. 6 Jan. 1775 (the original record says 1774!) and bapt. 29 Jan. 1775 in the same church, no sponsors being named. They also had a son John b. 22 Nov. 1781 (inf. Margaret Hunter). Johannes Hegeman is said to have removed with his family to the Province of New Brunswick (afterwards in Canada), and d. about 1784 (inf. Margaret Hunter). He may possibly have been the John Hagerman, who served in the New York Volunteers and as a Loyalist received a grant of land at Grand Lake, Carleton Co., N.B.[257] After his death Jannetje m. (2) Lawrence Wiltse, who in his will, made before 1820, leaves property to John and Cornelius Hagerman in the Province of New Brunswick (inf. Margaret Hunter).

(possibly by second wife)

  1. Tunis Hegeman/Hagerman,[258] bapt. 22 Aug. 1756 in the Presbyterian Church of Rumbout and Poughkeepsie, as a son of John Hegeman, no mother or sponsors being named in the record. He was presumably named for the recently-deceased father of his father’s first wife (whether this was his own grandfather we cannot say, the identity of his mother remaining open to doubt). A muster roll of the Loyalist Rangers, 7th Company, under Capt. John Jones, lists “Tunis Heagerman, aged 29, 5 ft. 7 in., (length of service) 5 years, 4 mo.”[259] As “private Tunis Hagerman” he is listed in a muster roll of Col. Ebenezer Jessup’s corps of Loyal Americans taken at Quebec on 24 Oct. 1784 (?). He was later granted land in Upper Canada, receiving lot 17 of the third concession of Ernestown Tp., now in Lennox and Addington Counties.[260] He d. 7 Aug. 1834 in Ernestown Tp., and was buried in Links Mills Lutheran Cemetery, in concession 2 of Ernestown Tp.; his tombstone claims that he was “aged 83 years” but this is doubtless an exaggeration. He m. 1795 in the Methodist Church, Ernestown Tp., Meriah Clarke, who “died July 11, 1853 aged 77 years.” Meriah was probably a daughter of their neighbours Edward and Mehitabel (____) Clark. Since she named children Edward and Mehitabel.[261] Tunis Hagerman and his wife had seven children.

12.   Hendrick4 Hegeman (Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1),[262] of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., was bapt. 10 Nov. 1717 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, and d. v.m. and intestate shortly before 24 Sept. 1747.[263] He m. by 1740, Geertruy Barentse,[264] living 1775, probably the Geertie baptized 31 July 1715 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, daughter of Hendrick and Marritje (____) Barentse; she married secondly, Denys Oostrom.
     In 1739 “Hendrick Hegeman, saddler, of Jamaica,” joined with “John Hegeman, weaver” (his brother) and “Hendrick Lott, weaver, of Newtown” (husband of his sister Adriaentje) to purchase 3626 acres of lot 8 in the Nine Partners Patent, Dutchess Co. (Drigg’s Hegeman manuscript). The decision to settle on this land seems to have been precipitated a few years later by his father’s death, within a year of which most or all of the family were living at Poughkeepsie.
     As “Hendrickus Hegeman” he served as a baptismal sponsor for Joseph, son of his sister Adriaentje Hegeman (no. 4.ii), in 1742. He is called “deceased” in his mother’s will (1770), which also mentions his son Joseph.[265] As “Hendrick Hegeman of Dutchess Co.” he d. intestate, and on 24 Sept. 1747 administration of his estate was granted to his wife “Charity” (this name being used as an English equivalent of Geertruy because of the similarity in sound). She was probably a daughter of Hendrick Barentsen of Jamaica, because the latter also had a daughter Susannah (bapt. 13 June 1725 at Jamaica), and a “Susanna Baarent” appears as a baptismal sponsor for Geertuy’s son Hendrick in 1742.
     His widow, as “Geertruy Barentsche, widow of ____ Hegeman [illegible], born [on] Lange Eyland and living in Negen Partners,” married 20 July 1754 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, “Deny Oostrum, born and living in Poughkeepsie.”[266] As “Denie Ostrom and Gertrey Barents,” they served as baptismal sponsors for a child of her son Johannes Hegeman in 1773; and as “Denne Ostrum and Gertie Barons” they served in the same capacity for Denys, son of her daughter Sarah (Hegeman) LaRoy, in 1775.
     Denys Ostrom does not appear to be very well documented. His birthdate may be calculated from his age at death as ca. 14 July 1730, and thus he was probably the child of this name bapt. 14 Aug. 1730 in the New York City Lutheran Church, son of Jan Oosterom, Jr., afterward of Poughkeepsie, by the latter’s wife Claudyne or Blandina Relje.[267] He became a communicant of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on 10 Jan. 1765, some ten years after his marriage, and a later annotation reads that he “removed to Pleasant Valley” in Dutchess Co. He and his wife may also have taken at least some of her children there, as her grandson Denys Hegeman (see no. 9.iii.b below) seems to have been of that place. They are buried in the yard of the 1st Presbyterian Church of Pleasant Valley, the stone of “Denee Ostrom” stating that he d. 20 July 1812, aged 82 years, 6 days, and that of his wife “Charity Ostrom” that she d. 16 Nov. 1795, aged 79 (?) years, 5 months, 28 days,” thus tentatively implying a birthdate of ca. 22 May 1716 which is slightly after the baptismal date suggested above.[268] It would therefore appear that Charity was considerably older than her second husband, and no indication of any issue of this marriage has been found, although the extensive losses to the early records of the 1st Presbyterian Church leave the matter in doubt. The “Dannie Ostrum,” wife not named, who baptized a daughter Hannah there on 27 May 1798, was perhaps a close relative, while the numerous other Ostroms buried at Pleasant Valley do not appear to be their direct descendants, and there are no surviving stones for anyone of the name Hegeman.
     It is noteworthy the number of subsequent connections we discover between the Hegeman and Ostrom families. Two daughters of Geertruy’s son Joseph (no. 13) are said to have married Ostroms, and, although it may be merely coincidental, a Simon Ostrom and his wife Catharina Hegeman baptized a daughter Maria on 9 June 1782 in the Dutch Church of Rhinebeck, the sponsors being “Roelif Ostrum and wife Maria Hegeman.” Perhaps this Roelof was the Rulif B. Ostom who d. 27 June 1829 “in his 73d year,” and is buried in the Dutch Reformed churchyard, Rhinebeck.
     The 1914 account of Hendrick Hegeman in Reynolds, cited above under our treatment of his father (no. 4), furnishes interesting if not entirely precise information which must have come from some family source. It states that “Hendrick Hegeman … died in 1750,” which is a little too late, and that “he is known to have been a farmer and to have owned considerable land.” His wife’s name is there given as “Gentje Borendji,” which (allowing “Gentje” to be probably a misprint for “Gertje”) would qualify as a rough phonetic rendering of her name. It derives a line of descent from him through his son Joseph.
     Probably most (if not all) Dutchess County Hegemans bearing the uncommon name of Denys belong to this branch of the family, and were namesakes of Geertuy (Barentse) Hegeman’s second husband, Denys Ostrom.
     Known issue:

  1. 15Joseph Hegeman, bapt. 21 March 1740 in the Jamaica Dutch Church with sponsors Jan Hegeman and Saara Hegeman.
  2. Hendrick Hegeman, Jr., bapt. 8 June 1742 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Hendrick Lot [husband of the father’s sister Adriaentje] and Susanna Baarent [probably the mother’s sister]. A Henry Hegeman signed the Association Test in Poughkeepsie in the summer of 1775.[269] A Hendrick Hegeman of this period m. Catharina van Wyck, and had a son Hendrick, b. 6 July 1773, bapt. 27 July 1773 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church. We would tentatively suggest that this younger Hendrick may have been the one who m. Diana De Long, and baptized children at Fishkill (1795, 1797, 1799, 1802) and at Hopewell (1806, 1809), although this man could alternatively have been the Hendrick Hegeman (1752-1811) buried at Hopewell, previously mentioned.
  3. John Hegeman,[270] of Poughkeepsie, b. say 1744, living 1782. Although we disagree with the paternity assigned to this man by Doherty, we see no reason to doubt Doherty’s statement that he lived in Charlotte Precinct, “next to Denne Oostrum’s fulling mill,” and d. 29 Dec. 1811. He m. 18 June 1765 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Maria Masten, perhaps a daughter of Cornelis Masten, of Poughkeepsie, by his wife Adriaentje Elswaert, or of Ezekiel Masten, of Poughkeepsie, by his wife Marritje Pels. Their marriage record omits their places of birth and residence. Known issue (all baptisms in Poughkeepsie Dutch Church):
    1. Marritje Hegeman, b. 30 Nov. 1767, bapt. 1 Jan. 1768 (no sponsors named). We wonder if she could have been the Mary Hegeman, who, according to a late nineteenth-century genealogy, m. Zachariah [recte Zacharias?] van Wagenen, and had a daughter Sarah, b. 1799, wife of Henry S. Macy, of Pleasant Valley and Port Byron, N.Y.[271] This Zachariah/Zacharias was a nephew of Elizabeth van Wagenen, wife of Joseph Hegeman (no. 15). We have not determined whether he was the same as the Zachariah van Wagenen listed in the 1820 census of Clinton, Chenango Co., N.Y.[272]
    2. Denys Hegeman, b. 30 Feb. [sic] 1773, bapt. 11 April following with sponsors Denie Ostrom and Gertry Barents [the paternal grandmother]. He was probably the one of this name who m. 6 April 1796 in Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church, Dutchess Co. (per IGI), Catharina McCord, and had a son John Hegeman, bapt. 29 Nov. 1796 in Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church (per IGI).
    3. Johannes Hegeman, Jr., b. 23 July 1780, bapt. 11 Dec. 1782 (no sponsors named).
  4. 16Sara Hegeman, b. say 1746, on the Nine Partners Patent (according to her marriage record).

13.   Francis (“Frank”)5 Hegeman (Hendrick4, Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1), of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., carpenter, was bapt. 13 Feb. 1742/3 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church,[273] living 1780. He m. before March 1766, Abigail Thorn,[274] b. ca. 1745, d. 22 Nov. 1815, aged 70 years, a member of the family of Samuel Thorn, of Cortlandt Manor. She was possibly related in some way to her husband’s stepmother, Catharine (Van Wyck) (Ter Boss) Hegeman, whose mother was a Thorne.
     His wife, as “Abigail Thorn, wife of Frans Hegeman Jr.,” is listed as a member of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church in March 1766. “Frenck Hegeman” and “Ebbe Thorn” served as sponsors at the baptism of Stephen, son of Peter and Ann (Thorn) Monfort, on 16 June 1771 in the Dutch Church of Poughkeepsie. They also served, as “Francis Hagemen and his wife,” at that of Joseph, son of Ezekiel and Phoebe (Thorn) Palen, on 19 April 1778 in the Dutch Church of New Hackensack. The two Thorn women were doubtless Abigail’s sisters. These baptismal records, together with those of Francis’ own children, place him at Poughkeepsie in 1771-71, and at New Hackensack in 1778-80. He was probably the “Francis Hageman” who appears in all the surviving tax lists of Rombout Precinct between 1774 and 1779,[275] and who signed the Association Test on 15 Aug. 1775.[276] According to Dickinson, citing part of Driggs’ Hegeman manuscript which we have not seen, “Francis Hegeman was a carpenter in Poughkeepsie who served in the American forces during the Revolution.” This statement is supported by the fact that a “Francis Hagaman” was a private in Brinckerhoff’s regiment of Brower’s company of the New York State Troops.[277]
     Known issue (order partly inferential):

  1. Catharina Hegeman, bapt. 26 Jan. 1772 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, no sponsors being named in the record. She was apparently the one of this name who d. by 1815, having m. (as his first wife) 3 April 1791 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Robert Hoffman, Jr., b. 6 March 1769 and bapt. 30 March following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Chuch, d. 31 Aug. 1827 aged 57 at Poughkeepsie, “survived by a large family,”[278] son of Lieut.-Col. Robert Hoffman, of Poughkeepsie, by the latter’s wife Sara van Alstyne.[279] However, the names Francis and Abigail do not appear among her chidldren. Whoever was the Catharine Hegeman who married Robert Hoffman, he was certainly the same man who married secondly 26 May 1814 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Mrs. Sarah (Berger or Burger) Williams,[280] for their daughter Amelia (b. 1815) was baptized in 1817 along with Robert’s son John by his first marriage. Robert Hoffman also had a son Josiah Ogden born in 1818. “Sarah Burger wife of Robert Hoffman” became a member of Poughkeepsie Dutch Church in 1816, and she probably outlived him as the name of “Sarah Hoffman widow of Robert Hoffman” appears without date in a later membership list. Known issue, mainly per Hoffman genealogy (all baptisms being in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church):
    1. Robert Hoffman (III), b. 28 July 1791, bapt. 14 Aug. following (no sponsors named).
    2. Sarah Hoffman, b. 26 Sept. 1793, bapt. 17 Nov. following (no sponsors named).
    3. Eliza Hoffman b. 179–; m. 1 Feb. 1815 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Isaac Cornell, of Poughkeepsie. Issue (mainly per 1899 Hoffman genealogy):
      1. Peter Martense Cornell, b. 20 Nov. 1815, bapt. 2 Jan. 1816 at Poughkeepsie.
      2. William Augustus Cornell, b. 2 Feb. 1818, bapt. 31 March following at Poughkeepsie.
      3. Margaret Cornell, b. 5 April 1820; bapt. 11 july 1820 at Poughkeepsie.
      4. Mary Cornell, b. 14 Dec. 1821; bapt. 30 July 1822 at Poughkeepsie.
      5. Elizabeth Cornell, b. 6 Aug. 1824; bapt. 23 Nov. following at Poughkeepsie.
      6. Jane Cornell, b. 30 Aug. 1829; bapt. 23 Dec. following at Poughkeepsie.
      7. Isabella Cornell, bapt. 28 Nov. 1832 at Poughkeepsie (missed in Hoffman genealogy).
      8. Frederick Cornell, b. 30 May 1835; bapt. 15/16 Sept. 1835 at Poughkeepsie.
    4. Martin Hoffman b. 179–; m. 5 Oct. 1824 at Poughkeepsie, Julia Harrison, daughter of Frederick Harrison, of Poughkeepsie, by his wife Zillah Hopkins. Julia was received into the membership of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on 18 April 1830. According to the 1899 Hoffman genealogy, Martin Hoffman had, “amongst other children,” a son:
      1. William Hoffman, of San Francisco, California, b. 182–, d. 189– at San Francisco; m. ________.
    5. Isaac Hoffman, b. ____; m. 23 April 1818 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Mary Sickles. Only child:
      1. Adeline Hoffman; m. 15 Jan. 1856 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Charles Powers, called “of Davenport, Iowa, [but] recently of Poughkeepsie” in their marriage record, but of Chicago, Illinois, according to the 1899 Hoffman genealogy. They had one child, Adeline Powers.
    6. Catherine Hoffman, b. 1800, d. 1859. She m. 15 Aug. 1820 at Poughkeepsie, Dr. William Thomas, of Poughkeepsie, physician. Issue (per 1899 Hoffman genealogy):
      1. Olivia Thomas, b. 1823, bapt. 26 Oct. 1823 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, d. May 1898. She m. (1) John Murphy; m. (2) Charles A. Savage. By her first husband she had one child:
        1. Elsey Katherine Murphy, b. 1860; m. Theodore Van Tyne Johnston.
      2. Caroline Thomas, b. at Poughkeepsie, and bapt. there 15 June 1825.
      3. Sarah Thomas, b. at Poughkeepsie, and bapt. there 15 June 1825.
      4. William Thomas, Jr., bapt. 19 Aug. 1826 at Poughkeepsie, d. 1830.
      5. John Thomas, b. 1 Oct. 1829 at Poughkeepsie, bapt. there 20 Aug. 1830, d. 1849.
      6. Elizabeth Thomas, b. 1834 at Poughkeepsie, d. [unmarried?] 1896.
      7. Robert Hoffman Thomas, b. 1837, d. unmarried.
    7. Dirck Brinckerhoff Hoffman, b. 5 Nov. 1807, bapt. 7 Jan. 1817 (at the age of nine years) with sponsor Amelia Dutcher [daughter of Antjen (Hegeman) Duytscher, no. 12.vi]. As “Derick B. Hoffman, merchant’s clerk, of Poughkeepsie,” he m. (1) 14 April 1833 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Harriet Martin, spinster, but she must have d. soon after; and he m. (2) 15 Oct. 1834,[281] Sarah Anne Manning,[282] who d. 6 May 1844, and as “Mrs. Sarah Ann Hoffman wife of D.B. Hoffman” was buried in the Poughkeepsie Dutch churchyard, according to the church register, although there does not seem to be any surviving stone for her. According to the 1899 Hoffman genealogy, Derick Brinckerhoff Hoffman had no issue.
  2. Elizabeth Hegeman, bapt. 7 Feb. 1779 in the Dutch Church of New Hackensack, Wappinger Tp., Dutchess Co. (no sponsors named), d. by 1780, when another daughter was given the same name.
  3. Elizabeth Hegeman, bapt. 6 Feb. 1780 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church; no sponsors named.

14.   Antjen5 Hegeman (Isaac4, Frans3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) was bapt. 27 May 1741 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, and living 1782, but probably d. by 1793, when she is not mentioned in her father’s will. She m. 23 Oct. 1756 at Lower Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., Barent De Duytscher,[283] said to have been b. 16 May 1733 at Fishkill, living 1782, son of David De Duytscher, of Rombout Precinct, by the latter’s wife Elizabeth Davenport, and a first cousin of the Catharina Duytser who had married her uncle, Hendrick Hegeman (no. 5).
     There is an eleven-year gap between this couple’s marriage and the birth of the first of the children baptized at Poughkeepsie, an anomaly not commented upon by Griffin, the historian of the Duytscher family. In fact, a careful reading of her father’s will of 1793 shows that all but possibly one of the numerous grandchildren named therein were her children. Her sons Isaac, David, Hendrick, John, and Levi “Dutcher” are named; also (in order) her daughters Nelly Van De Burgh, Elizabeth Du Bois, Mary Romar (wife of John Romer), Lydia Romar (wife of Aris Romer), and Amelia Hoffman. This document provides the hitherto unknown marriages of the daughter Amelia, and supplies the names of daughters Neeltje, Elizabeth, and Maria, whose existence had not been previously suspected. It also names a “granddaughter Sarah LeRoy,” who could be fit into the sequence of daughters between Elizabeth and Maria, but we have not been able to discover any marriage between a Sarah Duytscher and a LeRoy.
     On 25 July 1766, “Barent Duycher, yeoman, of Poughkeepsie, and Ann, his wife” mortgaged a parcel of about 65 acres of land in Rumbout Precinct for £122.[284] In 1768 Barent Duytscher was complained of by one Thomas Vorce, who had been pronounced of unsound mind, and over whom Duytscher had apparently been appointed guardian, who claimed that he had been “carried … off by force from the house of John Crandell,” his niece’s husband, to Deutscher’s house, “and then to the house of Isaac Hageman, father-in-law of Duitcher.” Vorce escaped and petitioned “that the inquisition that pronounced him a lunatic may be quashed.” But Barent Duytscher countered that John Crandell “had induced Thomas Vorse to transfer property.”[285] On 15 Sept. 1774 “Barent Dutcher of Poughkeepsie Precinct and Antie, his wife” mortgaged a parcel of 1000 acres for £590; this mortgage was cancelled 28 Aug. 1775.[286]
     We have nothing new to offer regarding the younger children of Antjen (Hegeman) Duytscher. The assignment of marriages to the Duytschers is difficult because of the repeated use of the same forenames in different branches of this large family.
     Known issue (all baptisms in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church; no sponsors named in any of the records):

  1. Neeltje Duytscher, b. say 1757, d. 27/28 Oct. 1829 at or near Richmond Hill, Markham Tp., York Co., Ontario.[287] She m. 25 Aug. 1774 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Peter H. Vanderburgh, bapt. 23 Feb. 1755 in the Dutch Church of Rhinebeck Flats, N.Y., d. (testate) 27 Oct. 1839 at or near Richmond Hill aforesaid, aged over 84 years, son of Hendrick van der Burgh, of Poughkeepsie, and subsequently of Burton, Sunbury Co., New Brunswick, by the latter’s wife Sara, daughter of Johannes van Kleeck.[288] Their marriage record omits their places of birth and residence. She is mentioned as “Nelly Van De Burgh” in the will of her maternal grandfather Isaac Hegeman (1793). As “Peter Van Deburgh, weaver, of Fishkill, and Nelly, his wife,” they in 1796 sold land apparently inherited from her maternal grandfather, and as “Peter H. Vandeburgh of Fishkill and Nelly his wife,” they sold land again in 1799.[289] The very good 1962 Vanderburgh genealogy, which should be consulted for further details, shows that Peter was a Loyalist, and brought his family to New Brunswick in the First Fleet of April 1783, receiving a grant of land at Oromocto, Sunbury County. His brother, Capt. Richard Vanderburgh,[290] followed in the second fleet which sailed in May of that year, their brother Henry came some time during the same year, and their parents in October. Peter Vanderburgh was back (at least on visits) in Dutchess Co., N.Y., between 1791 and 1797, when he baptized children there, and must have been back there on a visit in 1802, when his youngest child, Jacobus, was baptized at Poughkeepsie. But he eventually settled at Richmond Hill, Markham Tp., York Co., Ontario, where, in 1800, he purchased lots 38 and 39 in the first concession of the township. He was Collector for the townships of Vaughan, Markham, King, and Whitchurch (all in York County) in 1801.[291] In 1805 he was patented land in East Gillimbury township, York Co.[292] He is described as “Peter H. Vanderburgh, of Markham, yeoman” in an 1819 marriage bond for which he stood as a surety.[293]
         We have not been able to settle the question of the identity of the alleged brothers Peter and Stephen Vanderburg who were among the first settlers of Clinton, Ontario, as the present Peter’s son, Peter, seems to have stayed in York County. Could they have been grandsons? For what it is worth, we quote a passage regarding them from a history of the founding of Clinton: “The first settlers within the present limits of the town were Jonas Gibbings, from Toronto Township, in the County of Peel, and Peter and Stephen Vanderburg from Yonge Street back of Toronto. Mr. Gibbings left Toronto in the month of June 1831, coming by water to Goderich and out to its junction with the proposed London Road, which had not then been opened…. The Vanderburgs came through by land, arriving at the same time as Mr. Gibbings, who settled on Lot 23, Huron Road, Township of Hullett, while Peter Vanderburg settled on the corner lot of Tuckersmith and his brother Stephen on the Goderich side, just opposite. Peter Vanderburg built a log house, or shanty, which he used for a tavern, the first anywhere within miles. After some years one of the Vanderburghs died and the other moved away to the United States, being succeeded by a man name named Read….”[294] A website on local history however states that “the Vanderburgh name is still used [sic] in this part of Huron.”[295]
         Known issue:
    1. Sarah Vanderburgh, bapt. 30 July 1775 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Henry and Sarah Vanderburgh, d. (unmarried?) 16 March 1853 (inf. Terry Wanamaker).
    2. John Vanderburgh, b. 4 Oct. 1781,[296] d. s.p.s. 22 May 1838, and buried at Richmond Hill. He m. 29 Dec. 1805 in the Presbyterian Church of Pleasant Valley, Clinton Tp., Dutchess Co., N.Y., during a return visit to the U.S., Sarah LeRoy, b. 16 Sept. 1776, bapt. 29 Sept. 1782 in Christ Church, Poughkeepsie,[297] d. s.p.s. 16 March 1853, baptized as a daughter of John and Jane (____) LeRoy, although McLeod, the Vanderburgh historian, suggests that her mother was “Jane (née Davis), who as a widow became the second wife of John4 Leroy, Jr., a son of Jan 3 Leroy (Frans2, Simeon1 …) and Elizabeth Parmentier,” which John, in his will, mentions only relatives of his wife, and presumably “had no children of his own.” [298] Prentiss Glazier, in his 1974 LeRoy genealogy, calls Sarah “apparently the child of Jane (Davis) LeRoy … and probably step-daughter [sic] of childless John, Jr.”[299] John Vanderburgh owned one acre of lot 46 in the first concession of Markham Tp., near Richmond Hill, as well as land in Vaughan township, York Co., near Thornhill. He is described as “John Vanderburgh, of Markham, yeoman” in an 1818 marriage bond for which he stood as a surety.[300] He and his wife had three children, but were predeceased by all of them.
    3. Barnet [sic] Vanderburgh (doubtless named for his maternal grandfather), b. Dec. 1786 or Jan. 1787, d.s.p.n. 17 June 1863, and buried at Stroud, Innisfil Tp., Simcoe Co., Ontario. He m. 18 July 1811 in St. James Cathedral, York (now Toronto), by licence, Hannah Soules, b. 1784 in Digby Co., Nova Scotia, d. s.p.n. 18—, daughter of Daniel Soules, U.E.L., who was a patentee of Vaughan Tp. in 1805, by his wife Achsah Elizabeth Hollingshead.[301] During the War of 1812 he served as a lieutenant in Captain Thomas Selby’s lank company of the 1st Regiment of York Militia.[302] He is described as “Barnet Vanderburgh, yeoman, of Markham” in an 1819 marriage bond for which he stood as a surety.[303] He owned lot 24 of the 7th concession of Scott Tp. and lot 16 of the 11th concession of Innisfil Tp., Simoce Co.,[304] as well as land in Markham near Richmond Hill and in Vaughan township near Thornhill. Local historians, who have tended to call him “Barnabas” Vanderburgh, note that he built Dalby’s Hotel on Yonge Street, the first such establishment in Richmond Hill, which was eventually destroyed by fire.[305] One historian writes, “Barnabas Vanderburgh’s hotel was a large building with a driving-shed and stable covering a wide frontage along the road, and was reputed to be the first frame structure in the village…. Vanderburgh himself held licences only from 1823 through 1827, before selling the property to William O’Hearne…. Vanderburgh proved typical of these early licence-holders, as all either sold their businesses or simply disappeared from the records after a few years.[306] The 1926 Soules genealogy, previously cited, states, “Hannah Soules … was married to Bernard Vanderburg … and for several years conducted an old-fashioned tavern on York Street, near Thornhill in the County of York…. Hannah Soule Vanderburg … had no children of her own but had an adopted daughter who, having the property left by her parents, is supposed to have carried away the old Bible containing the records of the family of Daniel and Achsah Soules. This adopted daughter was married to Thomas Somersett…. Mrs. Somersett died many years ago and her eldest daughter, Elizabeth, was married to Frank Sambrook and removed from Barrie, Canada, to Michigan some time in the 80s. Address when last known was 107 Jackson Street, Marquette, Michigan.”
    4. Isaac Vanderburgh, b. about 1789, d. 5 July 1867, and buried at Richmond Hill. He m. (1) 17 June 1816 in St. James Cathedral, York (now Toronto), Margaretta Frederica Summerfelt, “of this parish.” He m. (2) Hannah ____. He m. (3) (unless the record belongs to a younger man of the same name) 9 April 1834, Eliza Dillon.[307] He owned part of lots 38 and 39 in the first concession of Markham township, and lot 14, concession 5 of King township, also in York Co. Only known child:
      1. Henry Vanderburgh, b. about 1823, d. 19 July 1854, and buried with his father.
    5. Hester Vanderburgh, b. 30 June 1791, bapt. 31 July following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors being named in the record), d. 7 Sept. 1873 in Nelson Tp., Halton Co., Ontario, and buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Burlington. She m. (1) 14 July 1807 in St. James Anglican Cathedral, York (now Toronto), Ontario, by licence dated the previous day,[308] Hiram Kendrick, of Yonge Street, York (now Toronto), b. about 1771, d. before 1819, son of John Kendrick, of Gagetown, New Brunswick, a former soldier in the 22nd Regiment of Foot, by the latter’s wife Dorcas ____, who as a widow brought her children to Newark (now Niagara), Upper Canada.[309] It is possible he had an earlier wife, Catharine Forbes.[310] He was patented land in York Tp., York Co., in 1802.[311] At some point he also acquired land on Yonge Street, for Scadding’s Toronto of Old, states, “The original patentees of lots six, seven, eight and nine, on the west side of the street … were four brothers, Joseph, Duke [actually Duke William], Hiram and John, Kendrick, respectively. They all had nautical proclivities; or, as one who knew them said, they were, all of them, ‘water dogs.’[312] This statement is corroborated by his being called a “mariner” in a record of 1803.[313] Indeed he appears to have been first mate on his brother Joseph’s ship, the Hunter.[314] Edith Firth, the historian of Toronto, also points out that “the Kendricks worked as house-builders.”[315] We do not know whether Hester/Esther had issue by this marriage. She, as “Esther Kendrick, widow,” posted bond dated 15 Jan. 1819 at York (now Toronto) to marry “Abraham Curtz, bachelor, of Markham,” the sureties being Peter Vanderburgh and Richard Vanderburgh,[316] and she accordingly m. (2) 21 Jan. 1819 in St. James Cathedral, Abraham Kurtz, b. 24 Nov. 1791 in Brothers Valley Tp., Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, living 1861 at Burlington, Halton Co., Ontario. The witnesses at the wedding were Peter Vanderburgh and T. McPherson. In 1822, “Abraham Kirtz” served as a surety for the marriage bond of his wife’s brother, Peter. Much of the information on Esther, and the account of her issue by her second husband, was kindly furnished by a descendant, Terry Wanamaker. Issue of second marriage:[317]
      1. Michael Kurtz, a carpenter, b. 1820, living 1861. He m. before 1851, Rachael ____, and had six children.
      2. John Peter Kurtz, a carpenter, b. 16 Feb. 1824 in York Co., d. 25 Feb. 1904 at Burlington aforesaid, and buried in Greenwood Cemetery. He m. 15 Dec. 1850 in Wentworth Co., Ontario, by a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Sarah Ann Katherine Lambier, b. 27 June 1834 in Saltfleet Tp., Wentworth Co., Ontario, d. 24 Nov. 1914 at Burlington. They had four children.
      3. Ellen Kurtz.
      4. George Kurtz.
      5. Jane Kurtz.
    6. Elizabeth Vanderburgh, b. 20 Oct. 1793, bapt. 23 March 1794 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church (no sponsors named). She m. 24 Feb. 1810 in St. James Cathedral, York (now Toronto), by licence, William Wilson, of Markham Tp.
    7. Amelia Vanderburgh, b. 16 Dec. 1795, bapt. 10 Jan. 1796 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church (no sponsors named). She m. 17 June 1816 in St. James Cathedral, York (now Toronto), by special license, Isaac Arnold, of Markham Tp.
    8. Richard Vanderburgh, of Richmond Hill, farmer, b. 17 Dec. 1797, supposedly in Markham township,[318] bapt. 4 Feb. 1798 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church (no sponsors named), d. 26 Jan. 1869, and buried at Richmond Hill. He m. (1) 17 Oct. 1816 in St. James Cathedral, York, by special licence, Elizabeth Fulton, of Markham Tp., b. 12 Aug. 1795, d. 1 Oct. 1840, daughter of Capt. James Fulton, U.E.L., “who fought in the War of 1812 and who died of cholera at Little York,” having come to York County from New Brunswick in 1792.[319] They were evidently the owners of the “The Fulton-Vanderburgh House” at 32 Hillsview Avenue, Richmond Hill, said to date from the 1840s, photogrpahs of which, with some family heirlooms, will be found in the interesting work, Early Days in Richmond Hill: A History of the Community to 1930.[320] He m. (2) in 1830-47, Phoebe Vernon, b. ca. 1810, d. 10 Jan. 1888, daughter of George Vernon. He is described as “Richard Vanderburgh, of Markham, yeoman” in an 1819 marriage bond for which he stood as a surety.[321] In 1837 he was the owner of at least part of lot 43 in the first concession of Markham Tp.,[322] and on 3 Dec. 1849 he purchased lot 4 in the second concession of Vaughan Tp. from Gilbert Milligan.[323] He had six children by his first wife and four by the second, for whom see the Vanderburgh genealogy, pp. 14-31. Its author, Wallace Edmond McLeod (1931-), Professor Emeritus of Classics at Victoria College in the University Toronto, and a prominent historian of freemasonry, is a descendant. The latter’s son, John McLeod, is at present (2013) a professor in the Department of History, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.[324]
    9. Peter Vanderburgh, Jr., bapt. 3 Feb. 1800 in Christ Church, Poughkeepsie. He m. 12 Sept. 1822 in Markham Tp., by the Rev. William Jenkins, Presbyterian Minister,[325] Elizabeth Mulloy, daughter of Thomas Mulloy, U.E.L., of Lancaster, Vaughan, and Albion.[326] This couple posted a marriage bond on 24 August 1822, the parties being both of Markham and the sureties being “Peter Vanderburgh, Sr., of Markham, yeoman, and Abraham Kirtz, of Vaughan, yeoman.”[327] At their wedding the witnesses were Jacob Tolly and Jacob Vanderburgh. Peter Vanderburgh owned 1 acre of lot 46 in the first concession of Markham Tp., near Richmond Hill. He must also have been a landowner in Vaughan Tp. in 1850, as the name of “Peter Vanterburg” appears in a voters’ list of that year.[328] In 1870, Peter Vanderburgh was one of the organizers of the school in Patterson Village, Vaughan Tp.[329]
    10. James Vanderburgh, b. 5 March 1802, bapt. (as “Jacobus”) 14 Aug. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named), killed during a quarrel in July 1816 at Yonge Street, Toronto.
    11. (position uncertain) Stephen Vanderbugh. Although the Vanderburgh genealogy cautiously states that there is some question of the certainty of this child, the facts it adduces, that he “appear[s] at Richmond Hill in the generation of Peter,” and his land in Markham township — 127 acres of lot 37 in the first concession — lay in the same lot as that of Isaac Vanderburgh, seems sufficient to establish his association with this family. He m. 1 Dec. 1825 in Markham Tp., by the Rev. William Jenkins, Presbyterian Minister,[330] Elizabeth Marven, the witnesses being Hugh Cennedy [sic] and Matthew Limburn.
  2. Elizabeth Duytscher, b. say 1760, living 1797. She m. by 1778, Gideon Dubois,[331] of Poughkeepsie, living 1797, son of Jeremiah Dubois, of Poughkeepsie, by the latter’s wife Rachel Viele. (His father was almost certainly a brother of Gideon DuBois, father-in-law of Peter Harris, no. 3.i.a above.) She is mentioned as “Elizabeth Du Bois” in the will of her maternal grandfather Isaac Hegeman (1793). Known issue:
    1. Rachel Dubois, b. 15 Jan. 1778, bapt. 1 March following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church; sponsors” Jeremia Dubois, Rachel Viele his wife.
    2. Gideon Dubois, Jr., b. 17 Dec. 1779, bapt. 23 Jan. 1780 in the New Hackensack Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    3. Neeltje Dubois, b. 12 Sept. 1782, bapt. 7 Oct. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    4. Hendrick Dubois, b. 6 Dec. 1785, bapt. 8 Jan. 1786 in the Fishkill Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    5. Elizabeth Dubois, b. 24 Oct. 1788, bapt. 22 Nov. following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church; no sponsors named.
    6. Hannah Dubois, b. 8 Aug. 1791, bapt. 28 Aug. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    7. Amelia Dubois, b. 5 May 1797, bapt. 14 Oct. 1798 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
  3. (postulated) Sarah Duytscher, b. say 1762-3, who m. by 1796, ____ LeRoy, to account for the “granddaughter Sarah LeRoy” named in the will of Isaac4 Hegeman, made some time in 1793-96. We can however find no actual record of such a daughter or of such a marriage. A John L. LeRoy was a witness to the 1799 deed made by Neeltje Duytscher and Peter van der Burgh, mentioned above.
  4. Maria Duytscher, b. say 1765 at Fishkill, living 1795. She m. shortly after 25 Oct. 1781 (when the banns were published), in the New Hackensack Dutch Church, John Rome/Romer, of Poughkeepsie, b. there, who must have been alive in early 1794, when his son John was conceived, but was dead when the same child was baptized on 28 Jan. 1795. Their marriage record provides their places of birth, and says that they were both resident in New Hackensack at the time. She is mentioned as “Mary Romar” in the will of her maternal grandfather Isaac Hegeman (1793). The baptismal record of her son David (1795) calls her “Maria Dutcher, widow of John Romer.” Known issue:
    1. Antje Romer, b. 1 Feb. 1782, bapt. 28 April following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Arnaut Romer and Antje Romer.
    2. Neeltje Romer, b. 24 June 1784, bapt. 18 July following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    3. John Romer, Jr., b. 16 Dec. 1786, bapt. in early 1787 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    4. David Romer, b. 15 Oct. 1794, bapt. 28 Jan. 1795 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
  5. Lydia Duytscher, b. 6 Dec. 1767, bapt. 7 Feb. 1768; m. Aris Rome/Romer, of New Hackensack. The will of her grandfather Isaac Hegeman mentions his “granddaughter Lydia Romer.” Known issue:
    1. John Romer, b. 18 July 1785, bapt. 20 Nov. following in the New Hackensack Dutch Church with sponsor Cornelis Rome.
  6. Amelia Duytscher, b. 23 April 1770, bapt. 24 June following (no sponsors named), probably living 1817. She m. 29 Jan. 1792 in the Fishkill Dutch Church, Martin Hoffman, said to have been b. 1773 at Poughkeepsie, brother of Robert Hoffman, husband of Catharina Hegeman (no. 9.i above), and son of Robert Hoffman and Sarah van Alstyne.[332] She is mentioned as “Amelia Hoffman” in the will of her maternal grandfather Isaac Hegeman (1793). “Amelia Dutcher wife of Martin Hoffman” became a communicant of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on 10 March 1810, and an “Amelia Dutcher” served as a baptismal sponsor for a child of her husband’s sister-in-law, Catharina (Hegeman) Hoffman, in 1817. We have discovered no issue of this couple, the 1899 Hoffman genealogy states that they had none.
  7. Isaac Hegeman Duytscher, of Poughkeepsie, b. 3 Jan. 1773, bapt. 14 March following (no sponsors named), living 1796. He m. by 1793, Catharina Du Bois, and he is probably also the “Isaac H. Dutcher” (not however called a widower) who m. 4 Sept. 1813 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, “Mrs. Jacoba Van Keuren.” He is mentioned in the will of his maternal grandfather (1793). Several deeds of 1796 relating to the freeing of his slaves are printed in Eighteenth century records of Rumbout Precinct…, p. 110.
    1. (perhaps) Johannes Duytscher, bapt. 8 April 1792 at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Wurtemburg, Dutchess Co., as a child of Isaac Hegeman and Catharina ____ (at least according to the IGI).
    2. Charles Duytscher, b. 19 Aug. 1793, bapt. 15 Sept. following in Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
    3. Neeltje Duytscher, b. 27 Dec. 1794, bapt. 28 Jan. 1795 in Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named).
  8. David Duytscher, b. 21 Dec. 1774, bapt. 8 Jan. 1775 (no sponsors named); living 1793, when he is mentioned in the will of his maternal grandfather.
  9. Hendrick Duytscher, b. 21 Dec. 1776, bapt. 7 Oct. 1782; m. 17 Nov. 1799 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Maria van Everin. He is mentioned in the will of his maternal grandfather (1793).
  10. Johannes Duytscher, b. 12 Oct. 1779, bapt. 14 Nov. following; living 1793, when he is named in the will of his maternal grandfather.
  11. Levi Duytscher, b. 2 June 1782, bapt. with his brother Hendrick; living 1793, when he is named in the will of his maternal grandfather. He is said to have d. 12 Sept. 1852, and to have m. Elizabeth Hutchinson, but it is not stated whether they had issue.[333]

15.   Joseph5 Hegeman (Hendrick4, Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1),[334] of Poughkeepsie and probably also of Schenectady, was b. 27 [sic] March 1740 (per his tombstone), bapt. 21 March 1740 in the Jamaica Dutch Church, d. 18 Dec. 1817 “in his 77th year,” and buried in the Old Cemetery at Hagaman, Montgomery County, New York.[335] He is mentioned as “son of Henry Hegeman, deceased,” in the 1770 will of his paternal grandmother, of which he was named an executor.[336] He m. (1) by 1761, and probably a few years earlier, Elizabeth Van Wagenen,[337] bapt. 1 Feb. 1743 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, daughter of Nicholas van Wagenen, of Poughkeepsie, by his wife Hester De Graef. Such a marriage is proven by the 1769 will of Nicholas van Wagenen, of Charlotte Precinct, Dutchess Co., yeoman, which mentions wife Hester and leaves 1/9 of his estate to “my daughter Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Hegeman.”[338] The man who m. Elizabeth van Wagenen is said to have been a Captain of Associated Exempts of New York Militia.[339] Although we have no information as to the date of Elizabeth’s death, and Reynolds says nothing of a second marriage for Joseph Hegeman, he was pretty surely — as claimed in an early 20th-century genealogy treating the Van Wagenens[340] — also the man of this name who m. by 1782, his step-father’s niece, Blandina (“Dientje”) Pels, b. 20 Oct. 1744 (per her tombstone), bapt. Feb. 1745 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, d. 27 Oct. 1812, “ae. 68 years, 7 days,” and buried with her husband, daughter of Hendrick Pels, of Poughkeepsie, by his wife Jannetje “Osterhout” (i.e. Oosterom); her mother’s true identity is revealed by her parents’ marriage record,[341] and confirmed by the appearance as baptismal sponsors of the maternal grandparents, John Oosterom and Blandina Relje.[342] The inference that the Joseph Hegeman who married Blandina Pels was the son of Hendrick Hegeman and Geertruy Barentse is supported by the fact that a son of this marriage was named Denys, the name of this Joseph’s stepfather Denys Ostrom. Elsewhere in the Hegeman family, the use of the name Denys was confined almost exclusively to the descendants of Denys2 Hegeman, and has not been found at all in other lines of the Dutchess County Hegemans.
     Joseph Hegeman, his mother, his first wife Elizabeth van Wagenen, and two of her brothers, John and Nicholas, were all part of a late eighteenth-century move from Poughkeepsie to Pleasant Valley, about six miles to the north-east.[343] A little later, some of this group moved to Montgomery County, the local history of which states: “we may mention the name of Joseph Hagaman, whose settlement at the place now called Hagaman’s Mills, was made in 1777. He was the pioneer of the north part of the town, and his farm included 400 acres. The village, which is now of much importance, was named in honor of its founder.” In a later passage it adds: “This pretty village, situated in the northeast part of the town [of Amsterdam], on the Chuctenunda, was named in honor of its founder, Joseph Hagaman, who settled here in 1777, and soon afterward erected a saw-mill and also a grist-mill.”[344] Reynolds’s Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York (1914), previously cited above under our account of his grandfather (no. 4), likewise describes Joseph Hegeman (1740-1817) as the founder of Hagaman’s Mills.
     Although Reynolds mentions only one child, Esther, there were at least six:

    (by Elizabeth van Wagenen)
  1. Hendrick Hegeman, b. say 1759-60, d. before 15 Feb. 1790 (when he is called “deceased” in the baptismal record of his son Henry). His placement in this branch of the family is indicated by the presence of his brother, Nicholas Hegeman, as a baptismal sponsor to his third child.[345] In Settlers of the Beekman Patent it is suggested that he m. Blandina Ostrom, b. 26 May 1756, daughter of Jan Ostrom and Engeltje Storm, but in fact he married this woman’s niece of the same name.[346] He m. (as her first husband) before 28 Aug. 1786, his stepmother’s first cousin, Blandina (“Dina”) Ostrom, b. 31 Jan. 1768,[347] d. 23 Nov. 1847, aged nearly 80 years, and buried with her second husband and her son Henry in White’s Cemetery, Highway 2, Bayside, Sidney Ward, near Trenton, Ontario, Canada,[348] daughter of Roelof Ostrom,[349] of Poughkeepsie, and later of Sidney Tp., Hastings County, Upper Canada, by the latter’s wife Elizabeth Yelverton, daughter of Anthony Yelverton, of New Paltz.[350] Blandina and her children apparently went with her parents to Sidney Tp., Upper Canada, by 1792, for according to her death notice (see below) she was in Canada prior to her second marriage. She m. secondly, on 9 Oct. 1792, Abel Gilbert, b. 27 Nov. 1771 at Goshen, Orange County, New York, d. in 1849 “in his seventy-eighth year,”[351] in Sidney Tp., by whom she had further issue (it is only this second marriage that is shown in the account of the Ostrom family in Settlers of the Beekman Patent). According to the local history, “Abel Gilbert settled upon lot 23, 1st concession of Sidney, and married Dentia Ostrom. It is said that this was a Dutch form of spelling the name, although the shorter form ‘Dency’ has been adopted.”[352] We would suggest that these forms were a corruption of Dientje, the Dutch diminutive of Blandina. Abel Gilbert is named as one of the executive officers of Sidney township “about the year 1804.”[353] The will of Blandina’s father, dated 25 March 1808, mentions his wife Elizabeth, “Blandina the wife of Able Gilbert,” and “my eight children namely John, Anthony, Daniel, Abigail, Blandina, Jan, Sarah, and Martha.”[354] Of these the first son, John, married Esther Hegeman below, and the second son, Anthony, married Sara Hegeman below. The long-lived Blandina (Ostrom) (Hegeman) Gilbert was the subject of an informative death notice:
    Mrs. Dentin Gilbert, daughter of the late Rulif Ostrom, was born in the Nine Partners region of N.Y. state, near the Hudson River. She married Henry Hagerman, by whom she had three children, one of whom died in infancy. Mr. Hagerman died c. the end of the Revolutionary War. His widow came to Canada with her two children, and met her father and family. On Oct. 9, 1792, Mrs. Hagerman married Abel Gilbert, who survives her. They were amongst the first settlers in Sidney twp., where Mrs. Gilbert died, 23rd inst., age, 79 years, 9 months, 22 days. She had 12 children, 82 grandchildren, and 91 great grandchildren.[355]
    The death notice of her second husband reads:
    Abel Gilbert was born in Goshen, Orange County, N.Y., Nov. 27, 1771, and came to Canada in 1789, settling in the Bay of Quinte area. In 1792, he married widow Hagerman, daughter of Philip (should say Ruliph) Ostrom. He died Sidney, Sept. 17, 1849, predeceased by his wife, Nov. 22, 1847.[356]
    Known issue of Hendrick Hegeman and Blandina Ostrom:
    1. Elizabeth Hegeman, b. 6 Aug. 1786, bapt. 28 Aug. following in the Albany Lutheran Church as a daughter of Henry Haggom and wife Dina, d. 1873. She m. 10 Oct. 1803 in Sidney, Prince Edward Co., U.C.,[357] Stephen Goldsmith, b. 23 June 1780 in the U.S., d. 16 July 1871, son of Thomas Goldsmith, a spy for the British during the Revolutionary War, who was granted 400 acres of land on lot 9, concession 1 of Holliwell Township.[358] At the time of their marriage he was of hall and she of Sidney. They are found with a sizeable cluster of Goldsmiths in Sidney township in the 1852 census, enumerated next to her brother Henry; it is impossible to tell how many households they comprise.[359] They are sometimes said to have had as many as twelve children, but only the following six are known with certainty:[360]
      1. Gilbert Goldsmith, b. about 1805 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, d. 1897 in Thurlow Tp., Hastings Co. He m. Mary McKenzie. They had issue.
      2. Thomas Goldsmith, b. about 1806 in Hastings Co., d. there 2 Oct. 1897. He m. Mary Perry. They had issue.
      3. Dency Goldsmith, b. May 11, 1808 Hastings Co. Ont. d. 8 Dec. 1903, and buried in Belleville Cemetery. She m. Benjamin Gilbert. They had issue
      4. Henry H. Goldsmith, of lot 27, concession 3, Sidney Tp., b. about 1810 (aged 42 in 1852) in Hastings Co., d. 1897. He m. 28 Jan. 1836, Margaret Lazier. They had issue.
      5. Phebe Goldsmith, b. about 1812 in Hastings Co. She m. before 1836, Elzur Hurd, and they resided at Whitby and at Sutherland, Ontario. They had issue.
      6. John Goldsmith, b. 14 Sept. 1814 in Hastings Co., d. 26 Aug. 1906 at Brady, Kalamazoo, Michigan. He m. 1 Sept. 1839, Mary Elizabeth Church Clute. They had issue.
    2. Roelef Hegeman, b. 6 June 1788, bapt. 22 July following in the Schenectady Reformed Church as a child of Henry Hageman and Dina Oostrom, obviously d. very young as he is not mentioned in the Gilbert family bible. Margaret Hunter informs us that he d. before 1790.
    3. Henry Hegeman/Hagerman, b. 17 July 1789, bapt. 15 Feb. 1790 in the Schenectady Reformed Church as a child of Hendrikus Hegeman, deceased, and Blandina Oostrum, with sponsors Nicholas Hegeman [the father’s brother] and Maria Peltz [Nicholas’s wife]; d. (testate) 28 Nov. 1852, and is buried with his mother in White’s Cemetery, Highway 2, Bayside, Sidney Ward, near Trenton, Ontario, Canada,[361] Henry Hagerman served in the 1st Regiment of Hastings Militia during the War of 1812, first as an ensign and later as a lieutenant.[362] He was several times appointed to commissions for roads, in 1831, 1833, and 1834.[363] In 1833 he was appointed a commissioner of the Court of Requests of the 7th Division of the Midland District.[364] In 1835, he was the leader of the group of citizens who successfully petitioned to have Hastings set off as a separate county.[365] According to the local history, “Henry Hagerman … came from New York to Adolphustown and at a very early day pioneered his way to Sidney… [and] settled on the Front of Sidney.” The same source then makes the following statement about his like-named son, but it should really apply to Henry himself: “[He] amassed considerable weath, making handsome advances to all of his children and still leaving a large estate. He was for years one of the magistrates of the Province and was highly respected.”[366] He m. 6 Nov. 1811 in the Presbyterian Church, Adolphustown, U.C.,[367] Tabitha Clapp. They are found in Sidney township in the 1852 census, enumeramed next to his sister Elizabeth (Hagaman) Goldsmith.[368] Henry’s will was made 25 Oct. 1852 and proved 22 Dec. following. Issue, so far as known:[369]
      1. Thomas Hagerman, of lot 28, concession 6, Thurlow Tp., Ontario, b. 1812. He m. Dency Clapp, b. 1824. They had issue.
      2. Henry Hagerman, b. 1815 in Sidney Tp., d. 1881. He m. about 1837, Nancy I. Davis, b. 1816 in Sidney Tp., d. 1901, daughter of Richard Davis and Margaret Jones.[370] They had issue.
      3. William Hagerman, of Sidney Tp., b. 5 Jan. 1818, d. 18 Sept. 1863 in Sidney Tp. He (as her first husband) m. 5 Jan. 1842 at Belleville, Ontario, Gatrey Ketcheson, b. 14 March 1814, d. 1899, daughter of Col. William Ketcheson and Nancy Roblin.[371] After his death she was remarried to Robert Everett Grass, whose second wife she was.[372] The local history calls his wife “Gaitrey Ketcheson … whose adventure as a young child lost for eleven days in the forest, has long been a favorite tradition of the Bay district.”[373] William Hagerman and his wife had issue.
      4. James Hagerman, b. about 1819, d. young.
      5. Benjamin Hagerman, b. 8 Jan. 1820 in Hastings Co., Ontario, d. 7 April 1884 in Rawdon Tp., Hastings Co., and buried in Stirling Cemetery. He settled in on lot 2, concession 6 of Rawdon Tp. in 1842. He m. 6 Jan. 1844, Matilda Ketcheson, b. 18 Jan. 1820 in Sidney Tp., Hastings Co., d. 1 Aug. 1907 in Rawdon Tp., and buried with her husband, daughter of Col. William Ketcheson and Nancy Ann Roblin.[374] They had issue.[375]
      6. Elizabeth Hagerman, b. 1821, d. 1863. She m. 19 Feb. 1840 in Sidney Tp., Charles R. Bonesteel, b. 1819. they had issue.
      7. Donald Murcheson Hagerman, b. 20 April 1823 in Huntingdon Tp., Hastings Co., d. 9 June 1901 in Hastings Co., and buried in Stirling Cemetery. He m. 24 Dec. 1847, Hester Ann Shorey, b. 25 Sept. 1824 in Rawdon Tp., d. 26 Aug. 1904, and buried with her husband. They had issue.
      8. Deborah Hagerman, b. 1825, d. 18 Aug. 1853, and buried in Hogle Pioneer Cemetery. She m. Jacob Emory Vandervoort, b. 1826 in Sidney Tp., son of Samuel Vandervoorta and Catharine Hess.[376] They had issue.
      9. Fidelia Hagerman, b. 1828, d. 1916, and buried in Bellville Cemetery, Section M. She m. Owen Roblin, b. 29 July 1824 in Thurlow Tp., Ontario, d. 28 July 1899, and buried with his wife. They had issue.
      10. Paul Hagerman, of Stirling, Ont., b. 31 Dec. 1830, d. 13 Aug. 1863, and buried in Stirling Cemetery. He was living unmarried with his parents in 1852. He m. Catherine Alicia Huyck, b. 1830, d. 1861. They had issue.
      11. Joseph Ostrom Hagerman, b. 1834 in Rawdon Tp., d. 28 July 1894, and buried in Stirling Cemetery. he was living with his parents in 1852. He m. 26 Oct. 1859 in Sidney Tp., Rebecca Amanda Parry, b. 17 Feb. 1843 in Sidney Tp., d. 15 Dec. 1885, and buried with her husband. They had issue.
  2. Nicholas Hegeman, b. about May 1762, d. in June 1808, aged 46 years, 1 month, and buried in the Old Cemetery at Hagaman, New York.[377] Doherty, who was either unaware of his tombstone inscription or saw an inaccurate version of it, assigns him an unexplained birthdate of May 1752, and places him as a son of Hendrick4 (Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman.[378] This identification is not sustainable. Nicholas Hegeman was clearly a son of Joseph5 Hegeman, whose name Nicholas gave to his only known son, and was himself named for his maternal grandfather, Nicholas Van Wagenen. He m. 19 Sept. 1782 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Mary Pels, alive on 12 Oct. 1810 (see below). They were residing mainly at Schenectady between 1786 and 1792, when three children were baptized there. As Nicholas Hegeman and Maria Peltz, he and his wife served on 15 Feb. 1790 as baptismal sponsors in the Schenectady Reformed Church for Henry, son of his brother Hendrick Hegeman. Nicholas Hagaman was elected as constable and as an overseer of highways for the town of Amsterdam, Montgomery County, in Feb. 1794.[379] Doherty’s account of this man is in other respects servicable. He writes: “Nicholas Hagaman died at Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., NY and his widow was granted administration on the estate 4 Oct. 1808. On 12 Oct. 1810 Robert Douglas and Jane his wife, a daughter of the deceased, stated that Nicholas had died about two years prior and that the widow Mary Hagaman had not yet petitioned for her dower [footnote cites Montgomery County LofA 2:10, Montgomery County Dower, 12 Oct. 1810].” Known issue:
    1. Jannetje Hegeman, bapt. 25 March 1786 in the Schenectady Dutch Church.
    2. Esther Hegeman, b. 26 May 1788, bapt. 4 July following in the Albany Lutheran Church.
    3. Sarah Hegeman, bapt. 11 Sept. 1790 in the Schenectady Dutch Church, alive in 1810; m. Robert Douglas.
    4. Joseph Hegeman, bapt. 5 Sept. 1792 in the Schenectady Dutch Church. Doherty notes that his age is stated as 16 when on 4 March 1809, Nicholas J. DeGraaf was appointed his guardian, with Isaac DeGraaf as surety.
  3. Esther Hegeman, b. 8 Sept. 1766, d. 14 Oct. 1833, aged 67 years, 1 month, 6 days. She m. 31 Jan. 1788 in the Reformed Church of Schenectady (on the same day as her sister Sara), by banns,[380] her stepmother’s first cousin, and her older brother Hendrick’s brother-in-law, John Ostrom, of Hegeman’s Mills aforesaid, b. 20 Sept. 1763, supposedly at Schenectady but more likely at Poughkeepsie, d. 27 March 1831, aged 67 years, 6 months, 7 days, son of Roelof Ostrom and Elizabeth Yelverton aforesaid. They and their children are listed in a family bible record in the possesion of a decendant, Roger Ostrom, of which a copy was kindly supplied by Candee Scofield Hoff. Additional information is given in a valuable genealogical letter written by a great-granddaughter, Annie W. (Candee) Scofield, to her father’s cousin, Edward Ostrom, dated 17 Feb. 1904.[381]
         Known issue:
    1. Elizabeth Ostrom, b. 8 June 1789, d. 30 March 1822 at Quality Hill, Madison County, New York. She m. before 1814, David Woodruff Candee, b. 5 Dec. 1783 at Oxford, Connecticut, d. 13 April 1865 at Amsterdam, New York, son of Nehemiah Candee and Content Woodruff.[382] Her husband is mentioned in a sketch of a descendant of his brother Eber:
      David W. [Candee], born December 5, 1783, in Oxford, Connecticut, died in Amsterdam, New York, April 13, 1865; he settled in Galway with his father, later in Amsterdam, New York. He was a clerk, school teacher and merchant; was captain in the war of 1812, and at the battle of Plattsburg; he was postmaster, justice of the peace and member of the New York legislature; he was at the time of his death the oldest member of the Presbyterian church of Amsterdam, and led the church choir for many years. He married (first) Elizabeth Ostrom, granddaughter of a revolutionary captain; six children; (second) [her sister] Charity Ostrom; four children.[383]
      He is also mentioned in a joint sketch of two of his daughters by his second wife:
      They [the Candee family] are the direct descendants of Nehemiah Canda, who came from Connecticut in 1790 and settled in Galway, and whose son, David H., was one of the first merchants locating in Hagaman's Mills. His whole life was an interesting history. With but a common school education, at sixteen he was teaching school, then became a clerk, and then a partner. He married a granddaughter of a captain in the revolution under Washington, and joined the army, first as lieutenant, and then captain in the Light Infantry, 1807-1813. His regiment was in the battle at Plattsburgh in the war of 1812. He died April 14, 1865, the oldest member of the First Presbyterian Church. He was a prominent politician, holding the offices of postmaster and justice, and in 1820 was elected to the state assembly.[384]
      They are mentioned in the 1904 letter by their granddaughter, Annie W. (Candee) Scofield. Their issue included:
      1. Julius Alonzo Candee, b. 30 May 1814, d. 15 May 1894, and buried with all three of his wives in Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.[385] He m. (1) 10 May 1847 in New York City, Caroline Hawks, d. in Jan. 1850 (the date of 29 Sept. 1853 on her tombstone replicates that of the burial of her husband’s daughter Ella three years later, and is obviously a mistake). He m. (2) 24 July 1850, Evelina Weed, d. 26 April 1889. He m. (3) 20 May 1890, his second wife’s sister, Cornelia Weed, d. shortly before buried on 13 May 1905 (her burial date); there was no issue of this marriage. Known issue:

        (by first wife)

        1. Mary Eloise Candee, b. 11 June 1848. She m. Walter Keeler Scofield. They had at least one child, Jane Evelina Scofield, who like her half-aunt Annie Weed (Candie) Scofield below, qualified for the D.A.R. by virtue of descent from Nehemiah Candee.[386]

        (by second wife)

        1. Ida Evelina Candee.
        2. Ella Candee, d. (in infancy) shortly before 29 Sept. 1853, when she was buried with her father.
        3. Annie Weed Candee, b. 17 Jan. 1855 in New York State. She was evidently interested in genealogy, and obtained membership in the D.A.R. by virtue of her decent from her great-grandfather, Nehemiah Candee (see above). She m. Edwin Lewis Scofield, and had a son, Edwin L. Scofield, b. about 1887-88 (according to his mother he was “in his 17th year” in 1904). Much of this material has been supplied by Annie’s great-granddaughter, Candee Scofield Hoff.
        4. Edward Willis Candee, b. 10 Nov. 1856, d. shortly before 14 March 1907, when he was buried with his father. He m. Helen Churchill Hungerford, and had two children: (a) Edith Candee; (b) Harold Churchill Candee.
      2. Leander N. Candee, birthdate unknown; m. Maria Palmatier, b. 8 Jan. 1816.[387] They are mentioned in a sketch of a son, John W. Candee:
        John W. Candee, Amsterdam, Hagaman’s Mills p.o., was born in Hagaman’s Mills October 16, 1847, and is a son of Leander and Maria (Palmateer) Candee. Leander N. Candee was a son of David W. and Elizabeth (Ostrom) Candee. John W., our subject, lived at home during childhood, attending the public school at Hagaman’s Mills until he was eighteen years of age, and then took a course of instruction of his uncle, Peter Smeallie, of the Andes Collegiate Institute. After leaving that institution he attended Ames’s Commercial school at Syracuse for about six months. He then followed the carpenter’s trade for six years, and on August 16, 1871, he married Nellie M. Nason, daughter of William Nason of Glens Falls. In 1883 he engaged with William M. Pawling of the Anchor Hosiery Mill, as bookkeeper and clerk, which position he still holds. Mr. Candee lives on the old homestead where he was born. Mr. and Mrs. Candee are the parents of two children: Mabel N., born July 30, 1877, and Anna M., born February 26, 1881.[388]
    2. Sarah Ostrom, b. 31 Jan. 1792, d. 4 Sept. 1867 in New Jersey. She m. William Winne Van Antwerp. They had three children:[389]
      1. Daniel Van Antwerp, b. 1813.
      2. Esther Van Antwerp, b. 1825, d. 1894.
      3. Mahala Van Antwerp, b. 1827.
    3. Charity Ostrom, b. 29 Dec. 1796, d. 30 May 1865 at Hagaman’s Mills. She m. (as his second wife) after 1833, her brother-in-law, David Woodruff Candee, alive on 14 May 1835, when he was appointed an executor of the will of his wife’s uncle, Anthony Yelverton Ostrom, below. They are said to have had four children, two of whom were:
      1. Elizabeth Candee, b. 6 Jan. 1830 at Amsterdam. A brief notice of her and a sister appears in a local history:
        Elizabeth and Andalusia Canda [sic], Hagaman’s Mills, daughters of David W. and Charity (Ostrom) Canda, were born, the former January 6, 1830, and the latter on May 9, 1833, in Amsterdam. The sisters have always been found together. Their education was derived in the public school near their present place of residence.[390]
      2. Andalusia Candee, b. 9 May 1833 at Amsterdam.
    4. Joseph Ostrom, b. 31 Aug. 1799, d. __ Feb. 1839 in Herkimer County.
    5. Ralph Ostrom, b. 28 April 1802, d. 28 Aug. 1853 at Brooklyn. A Ralph Ostrom, watch maker at 123 State Street, with residence at 36 Liberty Street, is found in an 1841 directory of Schenectady.[391]
    6. Anthony Philo Ostrom, b. 31 Jan. 1804, d. 1 Sept. 1882 at Brooklyn. According to the 1904 letter of his grandniece, Annie W. (Candee) Scofield, he m. Maria Weeks, and was father of:
      1. Edward Ostrom, the recipient of the 1904 letter from his cousin’s daughter, Annie W. (Candee) Scofield, above. He m. Laura Rogers, and had:
        1. Arthur Harris Ostrom. A man of this name m. Marion Robbins Richter, and had a son, Warren Ostrom, b. 3 June 1906 at Brooklyn.[392]
        2. Edward Ostrom, Jr.
  4. Sara Hegeman, b. 19 Dec. 1768 and bapt. 22 Jan. 1769 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church with sponsors Frans Laroy and Sara Hegeman [i.e. the father’s sister and her husband], d. 24 June 1817, “aged 49 years, 5 months, 24 days” (sic), and buried in the Old Hagaman Cemetery, Montgomery County.[393] She m. (as his first wife) 31 Jan. 1788 in the Reformed Church of Schenectady (on the same day as her sister Esther),[394] her stepmother’s first cousin, Anthony Yelverton Ostrom, b. about 1764-65, d. 18 May 1837, aged 72 years according to his tombstone,[395] and buried with his first two is wives, brother of the spouses of her siblings Hendrick and Esther Hegeman, and son of Roelof Ostrom and Elizabeth Yelverton. He m. secondly, Hannah ____, d. 31 May 1834, in her 66th year. He m. thirdly, before 15 May 1837, Angelica ____, the wife named in the codicil to his will (see below). There is no justification for published statements that this man’s first name was Henry.[396] He is mentioned as “my grandson Anthony Ostrom, son of my daughter Elizabeth” in the 1774 will of Anthony Yelverton, father-in-law of Sara’s older sister, Esther Hegeman.[397] By an Order in Council dated 16 June 1797, “Anthony [Ostrum] of Sidney” was granted land there as a son of Ruliph Ostrum, U.E.L.[398] However, he must have been there only briefly, in light of his children’s baptismal records. “Anthony Ostrom of the town of Amsterdam, County of Montgomery and State of New York,” in his will, dated 14 May 1835, leaves money to his three “sons John & Evert H. & Daniel,” and all his real estate to “my daughters Elizabeth, Diana, Hester & Martha,” in lots of 25 acres each, the one taking the property containing “the buildings and orchard” to compensate her sisters accordingly. He appoints as exectors David W. Candee [husband of his niece Charity Ostrom], John R. Hendrick [husband of his daughter Elizabeth], and Levi Pawling. In a codicil dated 15 May 1837 he mentions his (third) wife Angelica.[399] Known issue, according to the family bible “all … born at Hagaman’s Mills, Town of Amsterdam, Montgomey Co., N.Y.”[400]
    1. Ralph Ostrom, b. 10 Nov. 1788, bapt. in the First Lutheran Church, as Rudolph, son of Antony Ostrom and Sarah ____, with sponsors Antony Ostrom and Sarah ____.
    2. Elizabeth Ostrom, b. 21 Aug. 1790, bapt. 21 Aug. 1790 in the Schenectady Dutch Church (the family bible record gives the impossible birthdate of 21 Aug. 1793). She m. John R. Hendrick, who was appointed as one of the exectors of her father’s will.
    3. Joseph Ostrom, b. 15 June 1794, bapt. 14 Sept. following in the Schenectady Dutch Church (the family bible record gives the impossible birthdate of 15 June 1795).
    4. John Ostrom, b. 14 Oct. 1796 (per baptismal record) or 14 Oct. 1797 (per family bible record), bapt. 4 March 1798 in the Schenectady Dutch Church.
    5. Henry Ostrom (called Hendrick in the family bible record), b. 24 Sept. 1799 in the First Dutch Reformed Church, Amsterdam, N.Y., d. 14 Sept. 1832.
    6. Daniel Yelverton Ostrom, b. 4 Sept. 1802 in the First Dutch Reformed Church, Amsterdam, N.Y., said to have d. 25 Oct 1852 at Yuba, California. He m. (1) 14 Sept. 1824, Mary Davison, b. 13 April 1808, d. 2 Sept. 1850, aged 44 years, on the voyage to California. the widowed Daniel Ostrom was enumerated twice with his three eldest children in the 1850 census of California; once on 7 Oct. at Weaverville and Vicinity, El Dorado, California, and again on 20 Nov. at Sacramento.[401] He m. (2) 11 Nov. 1860 at Kemptons Crossing,[402] Melissa Sturges, without further issue. According to a biographical sketch of his grandson George W. Ostrom,
      [His son] Daniel Ostrom crossed the untraveled Plains in 1849, landing in Placerville in the fall of the same year, when he was fourteen years of age. His good mother had died while undertaking the journey, and he therefore arrived at his destination with his father and two sisters. The former pushed on to Sacramento, and there ran a hotel; and at that time, the spring of 1850, his two daughters were the only white girls in Sacramento.[403]
      Issue by first wife:
      1. William Henry Ostrom, b. 23 Feb. 1827; m. 12 Sept. 1847, Eliza Devore.
      2. Mary Eliza Ostrom, b. 15 April 1829; m. 17 May 1846, Joseph Devore.
      3. Sally Hannah Ostrom, b. 8 Jan. 1831, d. 7 July 1832.
      4. James Smith Ostrom, b. 1 Jan. 1834, d. 10 Feb. 1835.
      5. Sarah Jane Ostrom, b. 3 Jan. 1834 (in Upper Canada according to the 1850 census); m. at Sacramento, Lorenzo Dow Hedger.[404]
      6. Daniel Augustus Ostrom, b. 6 Feb. 1836 in Ohio, d. 1906. He was elected senator of the 8th District (1889), 6th District (1891, 1893).[405] He m. in Nov. 1860, Polly Anne Kirkpatrick, d. 1904. According to a biographical sketch of their son George W. Ostrom,
        Daniel Ostrom was born in Ohio. In 1849 he made preparations to cross the plains and, coming overland in an ox-team train, arrived in Sacramento, California, in 1850. He engaged in farming and freighting, his ranch being located at Kempton Crossing of the Bear River. Disposing of it in 1873, he purchased a ranch [then known as Reed Station] six miles south of Marysville, now called Ostrom Station, where he engaged in grain and stock-raising until his death in 1906. Polly Kirkpatrick was born in Springfield, Illinois. She crossed the plains with her parents, coming over the Oregon trail in 1852. Later the family came to Sutter County, California. She died in 1904. Her father, Thomas Kirkpatrick, died in Modoc County at the age of ninety-two years.
            Daniel Ostrom crossed the untraveled Plains in 1849, landing in Placerville in the fall of the same year, when he was fourteen years of age…. Mr. Ostrom later moved to Sutter County and took up land in the Bear District, which he farmed as best he could; but in 1873 he removed to Yuba County, just north of Wheatland, and became the owner of some 2000 acres of grain-land, as a result of which Ostrom Station on the Southern Pacific line was named for him. He owned other land near Wheatland, and was one of the large landowners and grain farmers of his day. He was a public-spirited man, prominent in public service, and he represented Yuba and Sutter Counties in the Legislature several terms, including two terms as State Senator. He was a candidate for the nomination for governor of California at one time, being defeated by only one vote in the convention.[406]
        They had issue.[407]
      7. Rebecca Amanda Ostrom, b. 9 Feb. 1838 in Ohio; m. 4 Feb. 1855, Francis Olyma.
      8. Lydia Matilda Ostrom, b. 23 March 1840, d. 8 Feb. 1848.
      9. Rachel Elizabeth Ostrom, b. 15 Aug. 1842, d. 4 Oct. 1843.
    7. Diana Hagaman Ostrom (called Dinah in the family bible record), b. 29 Nov. 1805 in the First Dutch Reformed Church, Amsterdam, N.Y. She m. 12 April 1828, Jeremiah Wiser.
    8. Hester Hagaman Ostrom, b. 24 June 1806 in the First Dutch Reformed Church, Amsterdam, N.Y. She m. 18 Jan. 1825, Thomas Ostrom.
    9. Martha Gittee Ostrom, b. 15 Sept. 1809. She m. in Jan. 1834, Henry Rowe.
    10. Evert Hagaman Ostrom, b. 21 Oct. 1811.

(issue by Blandina Pels)

  1. John Hegeman, b. 29 March 1782, bapt. 5 May following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church; no sponsors named. Doherty notes that a John Hagerman m. 17 April 1805 at Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., Elizabeth DeGraaf.[408]
  2. Denys Hegeman, b. 21 Aug. 1783, bapt. (as “Denne”) 2 Nov. following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church; no sponsors named.
  3. Francis Hegeman/Hagaman, b. 12 Feb. 1789, d. 4 Oct. 1844 at Stillman Valley, Illinois.[409] He m. 16 Feb. 1809 at Amsterdam, Montgomery County, Fanny Clark, d. in 1840-43, probably at Amsterdam, daughter of Gardiner and Hannah (Badger) Clark.[410] The account of his son Francis in a local history states: “Francis [Hagaman] senior was born at Hagaman’s Mills February 12, 1789, and was a son of Joseph, who came from Holland [!] in 1787…, and Betsey [!] Hagaman … Joseph Hagaman’s second wife…. Francis, father of our subject, was in the military service in 1806, and married Fanny Clark February 16, 1809. They were the parents of nine children, only four now living: Joseph B. of Illinois, Fannie J. Borbank of Califomia, Minor S. of Amsterdam, and Francis, our subject.”[411] Surviving issue:
    1. Joseph B. Hagaman, of Illinois.
    2. Fannie J. Hagaman, m. ____ Borbank, of Califomia.
    3. Minor S. Hagaman, of Amsterdam, N.Y.
    4. Francis Hagaman, Jr., b. 28 June 1819 at Amsterdam. Of him the local history says:
      Francis Hagaman, Amsterdam, was born in the town of Amsterdam about one-half mile from his present residence, June 28, 1819, and is a son of Francis and Fanny (Cark) Hagaman…. Mr. Hagaman was educated in the public schools and made his home with his parents until he was twenty-four years of age; when he married Mary Conner, daughter of Gilbert and Sally (Hagaman) Connor, January 25, 1843, after which they moved to West Charlton, where Francis worked at blacksmithing for three years, when he returned to Amsterdam and bought the farm of thirty-three acres where he now lives. He has built here a comfortable and pleasant home, and a blacksmith and wagon-making shop, where he has continued in business since 1846. They were the parents of two children: Sarah Alice, born January 28, 1847, and Fanny Ellen, born September 22, 1848. The latter married, September 25, 1867, Samuel B. Titcomb, now residing in Perth. Mrs. Hagaman died February 8, 1883.[412]
  4. Possibly two other younger children, as stated without explanation by Doherty.

16.   Sara5 Hegeman (Hendrick4, Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1), a daughter of Hendrick Hegeman and Geertruy Barentse, was b. say 1746, on the Nine Partners Patent (according to her marriage record), and d. 4 April 1814 at or near Poughkeepsie. She m. 13 March 1766 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, (Lt.) Frans P. LeRoy, b. at Poughkeepsie, bapt. 2 Feb. 1745 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, living 1794, said to have d. 26 Feb. 1839 at Johnstown, New York,[413] son of Pieter LeRoy and Deborah Freer.[414] We have already given reason for rejecting the possibility that Sara could have been a daughter of Isaac Hegeman (no. 6, q.v.), and noted that onomastic evidence overwhelmingly supports the present identification instead. “Sara Hageman wife of Frans P. Laroy” joined the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church on 24 June 1767. She and her husband served as baptismal sponsors for Sarah (1768), daughter of Joseph Hegeman (no. 15) and his wife Elizabeth van Wagenen. Glazier’s 1974 LeRoy genealogy gives the following account of him:

They resided at Charlotte Precinct in 1771; in 1772 he was elected constable at Poughkeepsie; in 1778-9 he was taxed at Pawling Precinct.
     Becoming active in the Loyalist cause at the outbreak of the Revolution, he was imprisoned for a time, and his property confiscated. He became a Lieutenant in the Loyalist militia, although his family continued to live in Poughkeepsie. In 1783 he took his household (4 children over 10, and 1 under) to Digby, Nova Scotia, receiving a grant of 294 acres.
     In a few years, with anti-Tory bitterness subsiding, they returned [by 1795] to Poughkeepsie, where she died, 4 April 1816, in her 80th year; he is said to have died at the home of a son at Johnstown, N.Y.

Surely this age at death is grossly exaggerated, as it would make her 8 or 9 years older than her husband. However, the statement about them being in Nova Scotia is correct. The name of “F.P.R. LeRoy” with a family consisting (including himself) of 1 man, 1 woman, 4 children “above 10,” 1 child “under 10,” and no servants, appears in a Loyalist provisioning list made at Sissiboo, N.S., in June 1784.[415] He also appears in another list, taken at Weymouth, in which he is called “Lieut. Francis P. Le Roy.”[416]
     Our record of their children is doubtless quite incomplete, as there are large gaps in the chronology, especially for the Nova Scotia period. Issue, much of this information being taken from Glazier’s LeRoy genealogy and from the excellent websites of Chuck LeRoy[417] and Theresa Gaskell (which traces about 840 descendants of this couple):[418]

  1. Gertrude LeRoy, b. say 1768 (no baptism found), d. July 1856 at Malahide Township, Elgin County, Ontario, where she had gone by 1842 with some of her children. She m. 18 Dec. 1785 in Nova Scotia, Reuben Hankinson, said to have been b. 28 Feb. 1758 at Upper Freehold, New Jersey, d. 20 May 1819 at Sissiboo, Nova Scotia, a son of Robert Hankinson and Sarah Taylor.[419]
         Gertrude LeRoy and her husband remained in Nova Scotia when her parents returned to New York. Sabine’s Loyalists says he was a “sergeant in the New Jersey Volunteers, taken prisoner on Staten Island in 1777, and sent to Trenton. Before the peace he was an Ensign.”[420]The Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War lists him as with Captain Waddell’s company, First Regiment, Monmouth County. [421] Jones’ Loyalists of New Jersey supplies further details, stating: “this American-born Loyalist … joined the New Jersey Volunteers as a private in September, 1776, and passed through from Sergeant to Ensign in the 1st Battalion on August 14, 1781…. His original commission as Ensign, bearing the signature of Sir Henry Clinton, is in W.O. 42:H6.”[422] He clearly must have come to Nova Scotia with the Loyalist settlement of 1784, but his name is not found among the published lists.[423] In 1794 he is listed as a captain both in the Nova Scotia Legion and in the Acadian Militia, County of Annapolis.[424]
         Reuben Hankinson gradually acquired considerable land in the Digby area. At an uncertain date he purchased lot 26 north of Sissiboo River from Stephen Jones, on 15 Sept. 1795 he purchased lot 13 on the same side from William Wilson, and on 9 Oct. 1787 he purchased lot 12 from Daniel I. Brown and wife.[425] Later he was one of the six original associates in the Hatfield land grant of 1801, one of the others being his wife’s kinsman, Francis Harris; Hankinson received 976 acres.[426] In 1824 he, or his son of the same name, purchased lot 15 of Digby from Deacon David Shook.[427]
         Reuben Hankinson was a Freemason, being one of the original members of Union Lodge, no. 20, at Sissiboo, formed in October of 1790.[428] Jones says that on his death he left a widow and 13 children. A number of them went to Malahide Tp., Ontario, aforesaid, Wilson’s Digby stating that Kenneth Hankinson and Thomas Hankinson “emigrated … before 1845 to the Province of Upper Canada, or Canada West [now Ontario].” [429]
         Reuben Hankinson’s widow Gertrude and some of her children were part of a group of Nova Scotians who went in the early nineteenth century to Elgin County, Ontario. Probably a search of census records could add considerably to the data given below. We note that the name Hankinson was still found in the south central part of Malahide township so late as 1877.[430]
         Known issue:[431]
    1. Francis Hankinson, b. 22 Nov. 1786 at Weymouth, Nova Scotia.
    2. Robert LeRoy Hankinson, b. 28 Jan. 1788 at Weymouth, d. 1867, no age given. He received land in Digby Tp. on 10 February 1817, and subsequently he and two of his brothers, Reuben and Thomas, shared in an 1822 grant of “an extensive block in New Tusket, north of Meteghan River.”[432] He m. 16 Jan. 1809 at Weymouth, Elizabeth McConnell, b. 4 April 1790 at Weymouth.[433] Issue, all born at Weymouth:
      1. Robert Hankinson, Jr., b. 19 April 1811.
      2. William Hankinson, b. 2 Oct. 1812.
      3. Susannah Hankinson, b. 1814.
      4. John Hankinson, b. 10 Nov. 1815.
      5. Reuben Hankinson, b. 10 Aug. 1817. Was he the Reuben Hankinson, master shipbuilder in the employ of Colin Campbell (1822-1881), the wealthy Weymouth merchant?[434]
      6. Samuel Hankinson, b. 28 March 1819.
      7. Susan Hankinson, b. 5 Nov. 1820.
      8. Caroline Hankinson, b. 20 April 1824 [recte 1822?].
      9. George Hankinson, b. 20 Nov. 1824.
      10. Joseph Hankinson, b. 16 Jan. 1826.
      11. Jane Hankinson, b. 29 Jan. 1828.
      12. Elizabeth Hankinson, b. 8 Dec. 1830.
      13. Benjamin Hankinson, b. 2 Feb. 1832.
      14. Gilbert Hankinson, b. 14 Oct. 1836.
    3. Reuben Hankinson (Jr.), b. 27 Dec. 1789 at Weymouth, d. 6 Sept. 1865, aged 75 years, at Weymouth in Nova Scotia. He and two of his brothers, Robert and Thomas, shared in an 1822 grant of “an extensive block in New Tusket, north of Meteghan River.”[435] He m. (1) 1814, Christina Shook b. 9 Jan. 1794. He m. (2) Charity Grant, b. 7 Oct. 1807. A newspaper death announcement reads: that Reuben Hankindon “At his residence at Weymouth, on the 6th inst. [i.e. 6 Sept.], in hope of a glorious inheritance, Deacon Reuben Hankinson, aged 70 years, leaving a widow, 8 children, 26 grand children and 2 great-grandchildren, with a large circle of friends to mourn.”[436] We know the name of only one of his eight children:[437]
      1. Daniel Hankinson, b. 10 Feb. 1828, d. 12 Jan. 1907. He m. 15 Dec. 1855, his first cousin, Mary Sabean, b. 10 Nov. 1833, d. 18 Dec. 1914, daughter of Henry Charlton Sabean and Sarah (Hankinson) McConnell, below. Issue: LeRoy, b. 3 Oct. 1853; Charles Henry, b. about 1857; Christina, b. about 1861, Willis Hankinson, b. 20 June 1863; Henry, b. 2 Sept. 1865; Martha, b. 24 March 1868; Jennie May, b. 3 Oct. 1879.
    4. Sarah Hankinson, b. 23 May 1791 at Weymouth, d. 14 April 1876 at New Tusket, Digby Co., aged 84 years. She m. (1) William Brown McConnell, b. 13 Feb. 1795, drowned March 1819 on the Sissiboo River. She m. (2) about 1824, Henry Charlton Sabean, who d. 14 Jan. 1878 at New Tusket, widower of Jane Prime (by whom he had one son, George Prime Sabean), and son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Charlton) Sabean. They removed to New Tusket in 1826. He was chairman of the Old Court of Sessions of Peace, Clare County, a deacon in Sissiboo Baptist Church, and a charter member of the New Tusket Baptist Church in 1843.[438] Issue:
      1. Benjamin McConnell, b. 1817, d. 1847.
      2. Sarah Elizabeth McConnell, b. 1819; m. Simon Delong Sabean.
      3. John Taylor Sabean, b. 5 March 1825 at New Tusket, d. there 8 May 1913. He was a farmer and blacksmith. He m. 29 Dec. 1857 in Digby Ridge, Digby Co., Cynthia Amanda Warne, b. 7 Aug. 1835, and they had seven children.
      4. Haines Sabean, b. 21 Oct. 1827 at New Tusket, d. there 20 April 1903. He was a farmer, and was active in the New Tusket Baptist Church. He m. 29 Dec. 1856 at Weymouth, Digby Co., Statira Ellen Weaver, b. 29 Dec. 1836, and they had eight children.
      5. Henry Charlton Sabean, Jr., b. 1 July 1829 at New Tusket, d. 24 Oct. 1903. He was a farmer and postmaster, and a deacon in the New Tusket Baptist Church. He m. 22 Oct. 1857 at Weymouth, Digby Co., Margaret Ann Randall, b. 25 Sept. 1836, and they had five children.
      6. Helen Jane Sabean, b. 1831, d. young.
      7. Mary Sabean, b. 10 Nov. 1833, d. 18 Dec. 1914. She m. 15 Dec. 1855, her first cousin, Daniel Hankinson, q.v. above, son of Reuben Hankinson, Jr. and Christian Shook.
    5. Daniel Hankinson, b. 30 Dec. 1792 at Weymouth.
    6. Gertrude Hankinson, b. 23 Dec. 1794 at Weymouth, d. 17 March 1875 at Deerfield, Van Buren Co., Michigan, and buried at Watervliet, Berrien Co., Michigan. She m. Matthew Hains McConnell, and left descendants.[439]
    7. Thomas Hartshorn Hankinson, b. 6/7 June 1796 at Weymouth. He seems to be called “James Thomas Hankinson” in an old family record, but it is as “Thomas Hankinson” that he is mentioned (with two of his brothers) in an 1822 land grant in New Tusket,[440] and that he was enumerated in the 1827 census of Nova Scotia. Only a year later, in 1838, he appears as “Thomas Hartshorn Hankinson” in a list of residents of Malahide Township, Ontario, who were enrolled in the 2nd Regiment, Middlesex,[441] and as “Thomas Hankinson” in the 1842 census of Malahide Tp., Ontario. He m. by 1828 (when she is named as his wife in the muster roll previously cited), Clarine Haines.
    8. Catherine Hankinson, b. 14 Oct. 1798 at Weymouth.
    9. Richard Hankinson, b. 28 Aug. 1801 at Weymouth.
    10. John Taylor Hankinson, b. 11 Aug. 1802 at Weymouth. He went with his mother and some of his siblings to Malahide Township, Elgin County, Ontario, and is said to have d. there about 1845.
    11. Ann Hankinson, b. 7 July 1804 at Weymouth.
    12. Jane Hankinson, b. 5 Aug. 1806, said to have d. about 1830.
    13. Kenneth Hankinson, b. 19 Sept. 1808, living 1842, went before 1845 to Malahide Tp., Ontario, with his mother and some of his siblings.
    14. Ellen Hankinson, b. 2 Aug. 1811, said to have d. about 1833.
  2. Hendrick LeRoy, b. 11 Feb. 1770, bapt. 6 May following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named), d. 9 Dec. 1848 “aged 78 years 10 months 5 days” at Sprout Brook, Montgomery Co., N.Y. He m. 29 April 1795 in the 1st Presbyterian Church, Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., Eliza Wickes (apparently also referred to as Weeks), b. about 5 March 1766, d. 13 Feb. 1844, aged 77 years, 11 months, 8 days. Issue:
    1. Daniel W. LeRoy, b. 1796-97, d. 11 May 1860, aged 63 years, and buried with his parents.
    2. Rebecca LeRoy; Glazier says she married, but does not know the name of her husband.
    3. Sara LeRoy; Glazier says she “married a Rhodes?”
  3. Peter Francis LeRoy, b. say 1772-73 at Poughkeepsie (no baptism found), d. 1847. Glazier says he m. twice; Chuck LeRoy gives a marriage in 1792 to Margaret Storm. Issue (according to Chuck LeRoy): Mary, Jacob, Francis, Peter Storm, Elizabeth, Lovinia, Helen.
  4. Denys LeRoy, b. 17 May 1775 at Poughkeepsie, bapt. (as “Denne”) 30 July 1775 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, with sponsors Denne Ostrum and Gertie Barons, d. 11 Feb. 1858 at Fenton, Shiawassee Co., Michigan. It is difficult to know how much credence to give Glazier’s account of this child, to whom he refers as “Daniel” without noticing the discrepancy with his baptismal record. For what it is worth, Glazier (with some added details from Church LeRoy) says he m. in July 1799, Edith Walbridge Fobes, and had issue: Elijah, Francis, Henry Wallbridge, Robert, Sarah, Augusta, Caroline, Thomas, Ellen, George.
  5. Levi LeRoy, b. 29 Jan. 1777, bapt. 2 March following in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church (no sponsors named), d. in Michigan. He m. 16 Aug. 1798 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, Sarah Palen, and had the following children, the first two baptized in the same church:
    1. Helena LeRoy, b. 14 Oct. 1799, bapt. 17 Dec. following.
    2. A son (name left blank), bapt. 16 Aug. 1801.
    3. John Phelan LeRoy.
    4. Peter Francis LeRoy.
    5. Henry H. LeRoy.
    6. Daniel Forbes LeRoy, b. 1811, d. 1896; m. Mary B. Morrison.
    7. Sarah LeRoy.
    8. Mary LeRoy.
    9. Gertrude LeRoy.
    10. Abraham/Abram LeRoy.
    11. Frances LeRoy.
    12. Laura LeRoy.
  6. (perhaps) Simeon LeRoy,[442] b. about 29 Dec. 1785 (but no baptism found at Poughkeepsie), d. 1 Feb. 1875, “perhaps near Mexico, Oswego Co., N.Y., aged 89 years, 1 month, 3 days.” Glazier is quite uncommited on the subject of his parentage. He m. 13 Jan. 1811, Matilda Whiting. Issue: Anson (1812), Lyda Ann (1815), Edward S. (1817), Charles S. (1819), Henry P. (1820), Steven (1822), Sarah A. (1824), Charles L. (1827), William W. (twin, 1829), Patsy (twin, 1829), Simon (1832).
  7. Reuben LeRoy, b. 28 Dec. 1793, bapt. 5 Jan. 1794 (no sponsors named); according to Glazier he is “said to have married.”


A list of the main Church Records used in these notes

Unless otherwise stated, all church records mentioned here are of the Dutch Reformed denomination. The following were serialized in NYGBR in the volumes indicated: Jamaica baptisms (vols. 105-110), New Utrecht baptisms (vols. 112-113), New York City (vols. 5-32), the Presbyterian congregations of Rombout [now Fishkill] & Poughkeepsie (vols. 68-69). Other editions used are:

Albany: as serialized in the Year Book of the Holland Society of New York, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1922/23, 1924/25, and 1926/27; these have recently (May 2000) been converted to electronic form by Dave Pane-Joyce in his excellent Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany, New York, 1683–1809, at http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/albany/refchurch.html.

Brooklyn: from Year Book of the Holland Society of New York, 1897.

Churchville, Northampton Tp., Bucks County, Pa.: “Reformed Dutch Church, Churchville, Bucks County, Pa., Baptisms 1737-1780; Marriages 1738-1772,” The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine 20 (1955): 150-79.

Fishkill and Hopewell: First Reformed Church, Fishkill … [and] First Reformed Church, Hopewell, copied … by Mrs. Jean D. Worden (1981).

Flatbush: Baptisms, marriages and other records from the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Flatbush, Kings Co., N.Y., transcribed and translated by Frank L. Van Cleef, copied by Josephine C. Frost, MS, 5 vols., at NYG&BS [FHL 0017663, items 1-5]; Records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Flatbush, Kings County, New York, vol. 1 (1677-1720), translated and edited by David William Voorhees. New York: The Holland Society of New York, 1998.

Jamaica: For baptisms 1702 to 1732, Baptismal Record of the First Reformed Dutch Church at Jamaica, Long Island, New York, copied … by Josephine C. Frost, 4 vols. (1912), typescript, NYG&BS, vol. I.

Kingston: Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston…, transcribed and edited by Roswell Randall Hoes. New York, 1891.

New Hackensack: The Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of New Hackensack, Dutchess County, New York, ed. Maria Bockee Carpenter Tower (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical Society, V, 1932).

New York City: Baptisms from 1639 to 1730 in the Reformed Dutch Church, New York, ed. Thomas Grier Evans (Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, II, 1901).

Poughkeepsie: “Records of the First Reformed Church of Poughkeepsie,” 1892 transcript at Adriance Memorial Library [FHL 940,278, item 4]. We must reluctantly mention that a published version, First and Second Reformed Dutch Church, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, 1716-1912, copied … by Mrs. Jean D. Worden (1992), was based on an illegible microfilm of the originals [FHL 533,472, items 1-5] and despite brave efforts on the part of the transcriber contains many errors.


Notes

1See J.Th.M. Melssen, “De Familie Hegeman,” Jaarboek van het Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie en het Iconografisch Bureau, v. 28 (1974): 28-45; “The Ancestry of Adriaen Hageman [sic] of New Netherland,”De Halve Maen, vol. LVIII, no. 4 (Feb. 1985): 1-3, 21.
2He is referred to, for example, as “the Worshipful Adriaen Hegeman, Schout of the Villages of Ame[r]sfort [now Flatlands], Breukelen [Brooklyn], Midewout [now Flatbush] and [Nieuw] Uytrecht on Long Island” in a record of 1664 printed in “The Records of Walewyn van der Veen, Notary Republic,” translated and edited by Berthold Fernow, in Minutes of the Orphanmasters Court of New Amsterdam, 1655-1663 [vol. 2] (New York, 1907), 13-72, at p. 69.
3Catharina Margetts was baptized 4 Feb. 1625 in the New Church, Amsterdam, daughter of Joseph Margetts, a diamond-cutter from London, England, by his first wife, Anna Weerdenburch; see John Blythe Dobson, “The Amsterdam years of Joseph Margetts, father-in-law of Adriaen Hegeman of New Netherland,” NYGBR 130 (1999): 174-80.
4Richard W. Cook, “The Tribulations of Denys Hegeman,” Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, 25 (1950): 49-54.
5For his account of Joseph Hegeman see p. 254; for his account of this Peter with a revised and probably correct account of his parentage, see p. 257.
6 Despite the many deficiencies of Driggs, his is considered, for better or worse, the standard account of the family, and citing it will remain obligatory until something better comes to take its place. The only meaningful way we can see of citing Driggs’s unpaginated typecript, the leaves of which appear to have been repeatedly rearranged since its composition, is according to the original scheme of the entry numbers. These are however not always legible, as Driggs later wrote over the numbers as many as five times as he changed his mind concerning identifications. Furthermore, the numbering of the entries was inconsistent from the very beginning, for the numbers assigned to children under their fathers were often copied incorrectly when their accounts were carried forward. In such cases of conflict we have preferred the numbering under the fathers, as it is the only way to avoid ambiguity, although in some cases the disparity is so great that we have had to give both numbers, separated by as slash with the “correct” one coming first; e.g. “371/384.”
7“Census of Kings County, about 1698,” in E.B. O’Callaghan, Documentary History of the State of New-York, 4 vols. (Albany, 1851), 3:133-8, at p. 137; reprinted in Lists of inhabitants of Colonial New York… (Baltimore, 1979), 175-80.
8Subsequent to the original appearance of this page in 1999, a similar account of Frans Hegeman appeared in Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, vol. 6 (2001), 343-44 ff.
9Driggs, no. 3.
10Amsterdam DTB, 8:210 [FHL microfilm no. 113,133], which record was previously published without citation in Melssen’s article, cited above, and in De Halve Maen 58:21. I am grateful to Pat Hatcher for pointing out an error in the transcription of this record in earlier versions of these noted.
11New York Genealogical and Biographica Record, 07 (1976): 107.
12See James Riker, Revised History of Harlem… New York, 1904), p. 698, note. Annie Bloodgood Parker, “Captain Frans Bloodgood of Flushing, Long Island, and some of his descendants,” Publications of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 6 (1917): 229-41, at p. 231, misinterpreting Bergen, erroneously refers to her husband as “Henry Hegerman [sic], who later removed to New Jersey.” We have not had access to the standard work on this family, George M. Bloodgood, Mrs. William C. Cahill & Mrs. William V. Callahan, Ancestors and Descendants of Capt. Frans Jans Bloetgoet, 2 vols. (Baltimore, 1982, 1966).
13There is a duplicate of this entry in the register of the Flatbush Dutch Church, under date of 31 Oct. 1680.
14Recorded in the register of the Flatbush Dutch Church.
15Frank L. Van Cleef, transl., “Records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church at Flatbush,” Marriage Fees, etc., p. 28, typescript, Josephine C. Frost Collection, NYG&BS Library [FHL microfilm no. 17,663, item 5], hereafter “Flatbush Fees,” p. 25.
16Bergen, Kings County, p. 137.
17Thomas Morris Strong, The History of the Town of Flatbush, L.I., N.Y., 2nd ed. (1908), pp. 41-4, at p. 43.
18“The Roll of those who have taken the oath of allegiance in the Kings County … September … 1687,” in Documentary History of the State of New-York, 1:659-61, at p. 659; reprinted in Lists of inhabitants of colonial New York, 37-39.
19Flatbush Fees, 44.
20“Rate List of Midwout, 1683,” in Documentary History of the State of New-York, 2:504-6, at p. 505; reprinted in Lists of inhabitants of Colonial New York, 124-6.
21David McQueen, “Kings County, N.Y., Wills,” pt. 1, NYGBR 47 (1916): 161-70, at p. 169.
22David McQueen, “Kings County, New York, Deeds,” pt. 3, NYGBR 48 (1917): 355-61, at p. 359.
23Jamaica baptisms do not state the mother’s maiden surname, but Elisabeth’s identity may be inferred from the baptismal sponsorships of some of her other children.
24Records of the Town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751, ed. Josephine C. Frost, 3 vols. (Brooklyn, 1914), 3: 285-6, 234-8.
25“List of the Freeholders of Dutchess County,” in Lists of inhabitants of Colonial New York, 253-6, at p. 254.
26See Bruce A. Bennett, “Pierre1 Parmentier of New Amsterdam and Some of His Decendants,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record (hereafter NYGBR) 138 (2007): 85-96, 199-208, at p. 202.
27Records of the Town of Jamaica, 1:390-92. The contents of this deed are also recited in a later one found at 2:90.
28Records of the Town of Jamaica, 2:372.
29Records of the Town of Jamaica, 2:374-5, at p. 375.
30Records of the Town of Jamaica, 2:58-9.
31Records of the Town of Jamaica, 3:52-3.
32Records of the Town of Jamaica, 3:285-87, 234-38.
33Records of the Town of Jamaica, 2:53, 156, 254.
34Records of the Town of Jamaica, 2:90.
35Flatbush Town Records as copied in volume 100 in the office of the Commissioner of Records, Kings County, New York, as made by Fank L. Van Cleef … being … a literal translation of all instruments contained in … Liber A, Flatbush Town Records … 1670-1780, compiled and arranged by DeWitt Van Buren [FHL microfilm no. 017,663], p. 21.
36“Census of Kings County, about 1698,” in Documentary History of the State of New-York, 3:133-8, at pp. 137-8; reprinted in Lists of inhabitants of Colonial New York… (Baltimore, 1979), 175-80.
37Driggs, no. 20.
38WNYHS 1:260-1.
39Driggs, no. 21.
40Driggs, no. 19. Where he is first mentioned under his father (Driggs’s no. 3), Driggs’ manuscript notations seem to link this child with two other Adriaens, one of whom he had originally numbered 27 and assigned to Jacobus2 Hegeman, and the other of whom he had originally numbered 37 and assigned to Dennis2 Hegeman (later crossed out and changed by hand to Hendrick2 Hegeman, but which note in turn appears also to have been crossed out in his own hand). The two accounts contain many contradictions. We have been greatly assisted in the revision of our account of this man by Charles M. Cook, who suplied many valuable documents.
41As stated by Dorothy A. Koenig in New Netherland Connections, 2:18. The claim of Bergen, Kings County, 326, that Maria was a daughter of Jan Janse van der Vliet, of Flatbush, and later of Six Mile Run, is chronologically impossible.
42WNYHS 4:404-5. Bergen (Kings County, 135) misquotes the date of probate.
43The testator names in his will: “three sons, Benjamin, Peter, and John,” and “[three] daughters, Mary and Anne Hagerman, and … Barche Dorlin.” His naming of children Benjamin and Barche (=Barentje) strongly suggests he was a son of Benjamin Hegeman and Barentje Jans. Furthermore, his son Benjamin, who in his 1772 will [WNYHS 8:114] mentions “my well-beloved brother-in-law, Carman Dorlon” (presumably husband of the testator’s sister “Barche Dorlin”), also mentions “my well-beloved cousin, Benjamin Hegerman,” and this is most easily explained as a reference to Benjamin4 (Jan3, Benjamin2, Adriaen1), who is known to have reached adulthood (see NYGBR 90:234; Stoutenburgh’s Oyster Bay, p. 246). No Carman Dorlon of the right time period appears in John Dorland Cremer, Records of the Dorland family in America (1898).
44Bergen tacitly assumed that all the children baptized at Jamaica to parents named Adriaen and Maria Hegeman belonged to the same couple, when there were actually three (!) different couples with these names baptizing children during overlapping periods. He might have had misgivings had he noticed that two of these baptisms occurred less than eleven months apart, a fact obscured by his reduction of the dates to mere years. It turns out that Margariet Hegeman, baptized on 5 Oct. 1719, does not belong here, but rather to a first cousin, Adriaen3 Hegeman (son of Joseph Hegeman and Femmetje Rems van der Beeck), and his wife Maria Cornel, an affiliation which might have been suggested by the appearance of her brother Guilliam Cornel and the latter’s wife Cornelia as the sponsors, and which is verified by a contemporary bible record situating this daughter in that family (cited by Mrs. John Spell, “The Cornel Family of French Descent,” NYGBR 96 [1965]:66-76, at p. 75; reprinted in Genealogies of Long Island Families, 1:314-24).
45“Franklin Township Historical Notes by the late Judge Ralph Voorhees, in 1874-’76,” pt. __, Somerset County Historical Quarterly 5 (1916): 115-19, at p. 117.
46We have relied on “Franklin Township Historical Notes by the late Judge Ralph Voorhees…,” cited above, for details of the will, which we have not personally seen.
47We take many additional details from “Franklin Township Historical Notes by the late Judge Ralph Voorhees…,” cited above.
48He was baptized at the same time and with the same sponsors as his cousin Hendrick Hegeman, no. 4.i.
49William W.H. Davis, History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 3 vols. (New York & Chicago, 1905), 3:94-5; Francis M. Marvin, Van Horn – Van Horne – Van Hoorn: The Van Horn Family History (privately published, 1929), pp. 326, 330; Mrs. John Spell, in NYGBR 84 (1953):203.
50We are very grateful to Kay Staub, of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, for pointing out this fact, which has caused us to revise our account considerably from earlier versions of these notes.
51These first four only are listed by Davis.
52 “Records of the Dutch Reformed Church, Bensalem, Bucks County, Pennsylvania,” printed in Publications of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 5(1) (March, 1912): 24-37, at p. 25. In this edition, the mother’s surname is misprinted “van Hooven.”
53“Some Bucks County Graveyards,” formerly available online at http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Meadows/1746/cemeteries.html, still available in the Internet Archive, at http://web.archive.org/web/20011128123247/ http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Meadows/1746/cemeteries.html.
54The birthdate of 16 Jan. 1718 given for him in Davis, History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 3:95, is therefore erroneous.
55William W.H. Davis, History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 3 vols. (New York & Chicago, 1905), 3:94-5; Francis M. Marvin, Van Horn – Van Horne – Van Hoorn: The Van Horn Family History (privately published, 1929), pp. 326, 330; Mrs. John Spell, in NYGBR 84 (1953):203.
56Bill Turner, Turner-Cogswell Family Genealogy, available online at http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~wmturner/.
57Bill Turner, Turner-Cogswell Family Genealogy, available online at http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~wmturner/.
58For her see Francis M. Marvin, Van Horn – Van Horne – Van Hoorn: The Van Horn Family History (privately published, 1929), pp. 334, 342. This Isabel is there supplied with a sister Martha who is said to have m. 25 Jan. 1789, Jan Hagerman, which creates the impression that two sisters may have married two brothers, but we suspect this Martha is actually a replication of the Martha van Horn on p. 327 who is said to have m. 25 Jan. 1767, Jan Hagerman, particularly as the date of the latter marriage is given wrongly and should be 26 Jan. 1769, according to the records of the Churchville Dutch Church.
59Birthdates from the 1929 Van Horn genealogy, p. 342; additional details from Bill Turner, Turner-Cogswell Family Genealogy, cited above.
60Information from Naomi McCabe, and Bill Turner, Turner-Cogswell Family Genealogy, cited above, where further details are given.
61Riker, Revised History of Harlem, 699, 703, where the wife of Frans Waldron is said to have been “Catherine Brunneal.” This identification was suggested to us by Jeff Carr, of Palmyra, Virginia, who says that the wife of Frans Waldron was actually Catharine, daughter of Jeronimus van Nest.
62Somerset County Historical Quarterly 5 (1916):59.
63 Edward Payson Whallon, compiler of Some family records: Partial histories of the Whallon, Hagaman…, Bloodgood, Jans … families (Cincinatti, 1934?), which we have not seen, claims descent from this man in the lineage he submitted to Virkus’ Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, vols. 1 & 3.
64Somerset County historical Quarterly, 8 (1919): 128, 129, 131, 217, 219, 221, 224.
65“Hageman-Van Nostrand-Davis-Voorhees” (query), Somerset County Historical Quarterly 4 (1915): 105.
66Somerset County Historical Quarterly, 8 (1919): 131, 213, 216, 218, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 226, 228, 230.
67Riker, Revised History of Harlem, 699, 703, where the wife of Frans Waldron is said to have been “Catherine Brunneal.” This identification was suggested to us by Jeff Carr, of Palmyra, Virginia, who says that the wife of Frans Waldron was actually Catharine, daughter of Jeronimus van Nest.
68 Somerset County Historical Quarterly, 5 (1916): 57, 59.
69“Francis Waldron (about 1775 - May 5, 1806 in Hunterdon County). Was this the Frans Waldron who was christened 27 Nov 1775 at Readington, son of Samuel Waldron and Catherina Hegeman? Records show a guardian record as follows: Waldron, Maria, Letty/Letitia and Catharine (-21), c/o Francis Waldron, Dec’d. Guardian: Isaac Low, present husband of Jane Low, late widow of Francis Waldron of Amwell Twsp. [sic], sd. dec’d; sureties, Peter Bonham and Christopher Sutphen - 8 Feb. 1810. Account of 1820-1825 signed by Letty Waldron and Maria Servis (late Waldron) and James S. Servis, and include money received from the administrator John Sutphin, dec’d (File 1625).”
    “In the records of the Neshanic Reformed Church, Francis Waldron and Jane Sutphen baptized: 1) Maria on January 17, 1802 (born November 28, 1801); 2) Alche [Leticia] Van Doren on February 11, 1804 (born December 14, 1803); 3) Caty on September 25, 1806 (born March 27, 1806). Caty (Catharine) Waldron Durham and Alche Van Doren (Leticia) Waldron Durham are buried in San Mateo County, CA. They had settled in Hamilton and Erie Counties in Ohio before moving to California.” — Harry M. Cleveland, Notes on the Hoagland Family: A Study of Several Branches With Allied Families, available online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hoagland/vanarsdale.html.
70Driggs, no. 16.
71Date from Filken family bible record, transcribed in NYGBR 35 (1904): 15-16. The record reads, “Annatie Ruard geboren Jan[uar]ai, 1, 1686/7 F. hegeman’s vrow,” i.e. Annatie Ruard, born 1 January 1686/7, wife of F. Hegeman.
72Her identity, which has been frequently misstated, was probably first revealed by Alfred Leroy Becker in “Filkin Note,” NYGBR 34 (1903): 216. For further details, and additional ancestry, see Carolyn Nash, “Magdalena Hendricks, wife of Cornelis Vonk/Vonck, and her mother, Catharina Cronenberg, wife of Jan Teunissen Dam,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 143 (2012): 265-75. Her father is said to have been “from Lifverpoel in Engelandt” in the record of his marriage, which occurred in the Flatbush Dutch Church on 22 March 1686; and though a check of the 1994 IGI for Lancashire found no-one of his name, it did show a few persons with surnames such as Rowert and Raworth in Liverpool and Manchester in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Antjen Rouard was, through her mother, a niece of Hendrick Vonck, who had married Frans’ first cousin, Catharina, daughter of Denys2 Hegeman.
73See for example Documents relative to the colonial history of the State of New York, 4:28, 938, 1006; Julius Goebel, Jr., & T. Raymond Naughton, Law Enforcement in Colonial New York … (Patterson, N.J., 1970), pp. 122-3, n. 277. Joseph Hegeman was one of the overseers of Henry Filkin’s will (WNYHS 2:130).
74Walter Kenneth Griffin, “The Dutcher Family,” pt. 3, NYGBR 41 (1910): 44-54, at p. 47. This multi-part article was subsequently consolidated into a pamphlet (undated and with no place or publisher stated), but this passage, at least, was not revised.
75The earliest exception we have encountered is a Frans Hegeman who with his wife Elisabeth baptized six children at Neshanic, N.J., between 1776 and 1788.
76If the reader will pardon a personal example, the present writer’s great-grandfather had a brother Frank Kennedy, son of Margaret Comfort, daughter of Francis Comfort, second son of Catharine Harris, daughter of Francis Harris, son of Catharina Hegeman, daughter of Frans Hegeman, second son of Adriaentje Bloetgoet, daughter of Frans Bloetgoet.
77Henry D. Bailey, Local tales and historical sketches (Fishkill Landing, 1874), 285; Helen Wilkinson Reynolds, “Filkintown,” Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 25 (1940): 65-9; “The Record Book of the Nine Partners,” Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 16 (1931): 27-33; Stephen H. Merritt, “The Brick Meeting House in the Nine Partners,” Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 7 (1922): 16-20. The consensus of modern scholarly opinion seems to be that Filkintown is a lost town which lay between Millbrook and Mabbetsville, in present-day Washington Tp.; see for example Joshua Lindley Barton, “The descendants of Solomon Barton of Dutchess County, New York, and Monkton, Vermont,” pt. 1, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 59 (1928): 39-47, at p. 239. Philip H. Smith, in his General History of Duchess [sic] County from 1609 to 1876, inclusive (Pawling, N.Y.: 1877), 309, 313, 423, had suggested that Filkintown was a forerunner of Mabbetsville, and in the last of these places stated, “It is said that Filkin, one of the original proprietors, caused the place to be named after him by the present of a barrel of rum.”
7848. Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 8:29-31; 24:53-4; 25:65-9.
79Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 25:46-7.
80Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 20:33.
81Indeed the only later instance of the surname found at Poughkeepsie is the 1799 marriage of a William Ruord to Ruth Crandle.
82Francis Filkin, Account book of a country store keeper in the 18th century at Poughkeepsie… (Poughkeepsie, 1911), pp. 64-6, 67. For the references to Frans Hegeman see pp. 16, 76; the “T. Hegeman” on p. 29 is probably a misprint for “F. Hegeman.”
83Francis Filkin’s account-book, p. 67. This deed is calendared, but unfortunately not quoted from, in Elias W. Van Voorhis, Notes on the ancestry of Major Wm. Roe Van Voorhis ([New York], 1881), 80.
84Elias W. Van Voorhis, Notes on the ancestry of Major Wm. Roe Van Voorhis ([New York], 1881), 53, 79; on p. 33 is quoted his own record of their marriage given in a family bible record: “Ick Kort Van Voorhees ben Getrout met Catryna Fylking Den 16 June, in het yaer 1727” (I, Kort Van Vorhees, was married to Catryna Fylking the 16th of June, in the year 1727.”).
85Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 25:46-7.
86Old Miscellaneous Records of Dutchess County (Poughkeepsie, 1909), pp. 61-2, 96-7, 135-6.
87Old Miscellaneous Records of Dutchess County, p. 119, 144, 154.
88Records of Crum Elbow Precinct, Dutchess County, New York, 1738-1761…, ed. Franklin D. Roosevelt (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical Society, VII, 1940), 21, 22.
89 “List of the Freeholders of Dutchess County,” in Documentary History of the State of New-York, 4:205-8, at p. 206; reprinted in Lists of inhabitants of Colonial New York, pp. 253-6.
90Records of Crum Elbow Precinct, 22.
91It is mentioned, for example, in Philip H. Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County, 309, 313, and (without specific mention of Hegeman) in Marie J. Kohnova, “The Moravians and their missionaries: a problem in americanization,” The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 19 (1932): 348-61, at pp. 354-55.
92[George Heinrich Loskiel (1740-1814)], History of the Moravian mission among the Indians in North America … by a member of the Brethren’s church (London, 1838), 79-80, perhaps better known under its earlier title History of the mission of the United Brethren among the Indians in North America.
93 Reba Kemery, “Early Deed Abstracts of Dutchess County,” without source-citation, from a web site which appears to be no longer extant.
94Records of Crum Elbow Precinct, 50-51, at p. 51.
95Old Miscellaneous Records of Dutchess County, pp. 166, 167, 168, 169, 172.
96WNYHS 4:239-40, corrected in 14:177.
97Roderick Bissell Jones, “The Harris Family of Block Island and Dutchess County, N.Y.,” NYGBR 84 (1953): 134-48, 216-32, at pp. 143-6, which tentatively but correctly identifies Joseph’s wife, and notes the mention of him in Francis Filkin’s account-book, among other sources. But notice the error in its account of Joseph’s parentage, already referred to, and corrected in the articles by Gale Ion Harris previously cited.
98Francis Filkin’s account-book, p. 92; this passage was previously noticed by Jones in NYGBR 81:144.
99Since this account was cast pretty much in its present form, there has appeared a chapter on the Harris family in Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Dutchess County, New York, vol. 6 (2001).
100NYM 172.
101This connection, which is consistent with contemporary records, is given in “an ancient parchment, the ‘Van Kleeck chart’ … now in the possession of the Dutchess County Historical Society,” transcribed in Prentiss Glazier’s Van Kleeck family of Dutchess County, New York (Typescript, 1974, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), and referred to in p. 3 of his text. Gideon DuBois was bapt. 11 Jan. 1719 in the Kingston Dutch Church, son of Matthys DuBois and Sara Matthys [van Keulen] (KgB no. 2628), and older brother of Jeremiah DuBois, bapt. 18 May 1721 in the same church (KgB no. 2879), who married Rachel Viele, and they both served as a baptismal sponsor for the third child of Sarah (DuBois) Harris. It is not clear precisely when Gideon DuBois married Sara van Kleeck, but they served together as baptismal sponsors on 8 May 1740 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, although no relationship is stated between them in the record. Gideon Dubois, who was bapt. 11 Jan. 1719 in the Kingston Dutch Church, was a son of Matthys Dubois and Sara Matthys van Keulen. He had a brother Jeremiah DuBois who Bois served as baptismal sponsors for the third child of Peter Harris and Sarah DuBois.
102Bureau of Archives for the Province of Ontario, 2nd Report (1904), 635-6; Peter Wilson Coldham, American Loyalist Claims, volume I, abstracted from the Public Record Office, Audit Office Series 13, Bundles 1-35 & 37 (Washington, D.C.: National Genealogical Society, 1980). 218-19.
103Public Archives of Nova Scotia, M.G. 4, vol. 141, as cited in Allan Everett Marble, Deaths, burials, and probate of Nova Scotians, 1749-1799, from primary sources, 2 vols. (Halifax, Nova Scotia: Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia, 1990), 1:110, which is not clear as to whether the burial was at Christ Church (Anglican) or in the Presbyterian Cemetery.
104Public Archives of Nova Scotia, R.G. 1, vol. 446, fos. 72, 73.
105Information from Cecelia Botting in a letter of 13 Feb. 1991; we have not seen the original will.
106Catharina’s parentage, which does not appear to have been previously stated in print, is proven by the appearance of “Isaac Lent and his wife Sarah Luister” as baptismal sponsors to her son Peter, bapt. 27 Oct. 1765 in the Hopewell Dutch Church, and by the fact that Isaac Lent, shortly before his death, co-signed a £600 bond for Francis Harris; see Eighteenth Century Records of the portion of Dutchess County, New York, that was included in Rombout Precinct (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical society, VI, 1938), mortgage no. 100, pp. 143-4. Isaac Lent figures in Riker’s Newtown, p. 317, and in A. Van Doren Honeyman, Joannes Nevius … and his descendants … (Plainfield, N.J., 1900), p. 592. There in an undocumented but rather good treatment of his family in William A. Campbell & Ruth Campbell Summers, The Ancestors and Descendants of Matthias Lent … and Susan Minier … (1975), pp. 6 ff., which greatly improves upon that given in the 1903 Lent genealogy, p. 75; neither of these works mentions his daughter Catharina.
107See out HARRIS notes for a discussion of this question.
108NYGBR 84:145. Regarding Francis Harris, in addition to the indications Jones cites — unless these are merely other editions of the same documents — there are the “Muster Roll of disbanded officers, discharged and disbanded soldiers, and Loyalists taken at Digby, the 29th day of May, 1784,” pt. 1, NYGBR 34 (1903): 118-23, at p. 122, reprinted in the second volume of Calnek’s Annapolis, and the land records abstracted in Marion Gilroy, Loyalists and Land Settlement in Nova Scotia (Halifax, 1937), 14, 33.
109Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 133, 389-92, at p. 389; Abraham Hatfield, The Hatfields of Westchester: a genealogy of the descendants of Thomas Hatfield, of New Amsterdam and Mamaroneck, whose sons settled in White Plains, Westchester County, New York (New York, 1935), 69; Elaine Deion, The Hatfield Grant, available online at http://www.rootsweb.com/~nsdigby/lists/hatfield.htm.
110Isaiah W. Wilson, A Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia (Halifax,1900), pp. 90, 386.
111Wilson’s Digby, p. 360.
112NYM 171.
113R. Janet Powell,. Annals of the Forty: Loyalist and Pioneer Families of West Lincoln, 1783-1833, 1st ed., 10 vols. (Grimsby, Ontario, 1952-59), 4:25-7, 8:90; Cecelia C. Botting & Roland B. Botting, Comfort Families of America… (Brookings, S.D., 1971), 328-82, 621; “Families in Process of Research,” Genealogical Newsletter of the Nova Scotia Historical Society, no. 15 (April 1976), p. 1.
114This letter is cited in a Harris-Comfort appendix in Roland and Cecelia Botting, A History of the Kennedy Family (Hutchinson, Kansas, 1957), 17-22, in which the two families are somewhat confused; this appendix was withdrawn from subsequent editions and the Bottings never published a revised version of their material on the Harrises.
115The record refers to the groom as “Ephraim Harris Jr.,” an error which has caused much confusion but is fortunately corrected by Calnek (see below in the text) and other evidence. As pointed out to me by Ross W. McCurdy, the error is further compounded in a modern transcript of the church register, P.A.N.S. MG-4, vol. 23, item 3, reel 15032, in which the name of the groom is given as “Ephraim Haines Jr.,” a mistake which shows up in the IGI. Some writers have attempted to accomodate this reading and insisted that Rachel McDormand had two husbands, Francis Harris and Ephraim Haines, but this is chronologically impossible.
116Calnek’s Annapolis, 1:547; Wilson’s Digby.
117Following Driggs’ Hegeman manuscript; we have not seen the original record.
118The account of this man in Driggs is split between entries no. 15 (a generally good treatment but with erroneous parentage) and no. 24 (where he is confused with the husband of Adriaentje van Wyck).
119This is one of the baptisms printed in Year Book of the Holland Society of New York, 1897, pp. 189-94, at p. 191, as coming from “two sheets evidently not belonging to the Brooklyn Church records.” As about 17 of these entries are duplicated in the Flatbush register, it is likely that the sheets really came therefrom, especially as many of the parents were known residents of Flatbush.
120See Bergen, Kings County, 326, for an account of the van der Vliet family. Bergen treats Sara’s two marriages on pp. 138, 379, apparently without recognizing that they pertained to the same person. For a discussion of the European background of this family, which corrects other errors in Bergen, see Harry Macy, Jr., “Origins of Some New Netherland Families,” pt. 2, NYGBR 123 (1992): 93-96, at pp. 95-96.
121 Elias W. Van Voorhis, Notes on the ancestry of Major Wm. Roe Van Voorhis ([New York], 1881), 25-40, where however the author fails to make the obvious inference that Sara had been the widow of a Hegeman when she married Johannes Coerten van Voorhees, and comes (at p. 40) to the bizarre conclusion that all the Hegeman children named in her will were “adopted.” At pp. 30-31 are printed the family bible record begun by Johannes Coerten van Voorhees himself, in which he writes: “Johannes Van Voorhees is wederow [sic], getrout met syn twede vro[u]w, genaant Sara, den 2 May, anno 1744. Dese Sara out synde 49 yaer en 6 maanten. Dese Sara Vliet is geboren in het yaer anno 1694, den 7 dag van November.” (Johannes Van Voorhees, widower, was married to his second wife, named Sara, the 2nd of May, anno 1744. This Sara was aged 49 years and 6 months. This Sara Vliet was born in the year anno [sic] 1694, the 7th day of November.)
122Van Voorhis, Notes on the ancestry of Major Wm. Roe Van Voorhis, 40, prints this will in extenso, but compare the abstract given in Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct and the original Town of Fishkill…: estates, no. 240, p. 237, for an important correction: in the phrase “children of William Allen, which he hath by his first wife,” Voorhis omits the word “Allen.”
123Bergen, p. 138; Patricia U. Bonomi, A Factious People: Politics and Society in Colonial New York (New York & London, 1971), p. 302.
124See Dorothy A. Koenig’s valuable note on “Adriaentje Van Wyck” in New Netherland Connections, vol. 2, no. 1 (Jan.-March 1997): 17-18. Koenig further proves that Adriaentje was still alive in 1756, and that she and her husband, some time after 1734, took their family to New Jersey. Their departure from Long Island somewhat eases the confusion among various Hegeman lines after that time.
125A photocopy of this letter, of which the original is in the possession of a descendant, Roger Ostrom, was kindly provided by Candee Scofield Hoff.
126WNYHS 3:329-30.
127Teunis G. Bergen, The Bergen Family, 2nd ed. (Albany, 1876), p. 154.
128Henry A. Stoutenburgh, A Documentary history of the Dutch Congregation of Oyster Bay, Queens County… (1902), pp. 254-5.
129An informant tells us that an additional child, Geertje Hegeman, who became the wife of William Williamson, is claimed in The Wyckoff Family in America, 2 vols. (Baltimore, 1980), p. 13, which we have not seen.
130NYGBR 69:286; we are grateful to Carol (Roach) Murray for pointing out that in early drafts of these notes, we neglected to include the marriage place, which is mentioned in the record.
131A.V. Phillips, The Lott family in America (Trenton, N.J., 1942), p. 10, which indentifies the Hendrick Lott baptized in 1718 with the one who married Hester Buckout, and notes this as a second marriage, without however supplying the name of the first wife.
132Drigg’ Hegeman manuscript.
133WNYHS 6:211; Fernow Wills, no. 1038. We are grateful to Carol (Roach) Murray for bringing this item to our attention.
134Driggs, no. 66 (originally misnumbered 96 in his own account), with erroneous identification of his grandfather.
135Barbara A. Barth, “The family of Dirck Janszen Woertman of Brooklyn Ferry,” pt. 2, NYGBR 133 (2002): 137-46, at p. 138, on which we have drawn heavily in our account of this family.
136Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, New York, collected and edited by J. Wilson Poucher & Helen Wilkinson Reynolds (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical Society, vol. II, 1924), p. 215.
137The Adriance Library transcript says “probably 6 July”; Henry Z. Jones, Jr., The Palatine Families of New York…, 2 vols. (Universal City, Calif., 1985), 1:241-3, at p. 243 (q.v. for his parentage), says 12 Oct. (which is the next date in the register). The surname is misread as “Wagenen” in Mrs. Worden’s transcript of the church’s register. We give here what was probably the most prevalent American spelling of the Flagler surname. It was often written Vlegler in Dutch records.
138See George E. McCracken, “Roger Barton of Westchester County, N.Y., and some of his earlier descendants,” pt. 2, New England Historical and Genealogical Register 106 (1952): 290-304, at pp. 303-4.
139NYGBR 69:80-83 passim (for the baptismal records); NYGBR 87 (1956): 159-60 (for the bible record of a son, Barton). Of these children, Sara (born 1751) was the wife of John van Wagenen (son of Nicolaes van Wagenen and Hester De Graef) and mother of Zachariah [or Zacharias?] van Wagenen, who m. Mary Hegeman (see our no. 11.iii.a for her possible identification). Descendants of Zacharias Flagler by his second marriage include Henry Harkness Flagler (see the National Cyclopedia of American Biography, 42:147) and Henry Morrison Flagler (see DAB).
14010,000 Vital Records of Eastern New York, 1777-1834, ed. Fred Q. Bowman (Baltimore, 1987), entry no. 3077.
141Francis Filkin’s account-book, p. 101.
142WNYHS 8:141-2, corr. 17:325; Fernow Wills, no. 27.
143The will of “Caleb Haight, Sr., of Charlotte Precinct, in Duchess County” mentions wife Elizabeth and leaves “to my son Benjamin the east half of the farm whereon I now live” (WNYHS 9:264). Caleb Haight is treated briefly and rather sketchily in David W. Hoyt, Genealogical History of the Hoyt, Haight, and Hight Families, with some account of the earlier Hyatt families (Providence, 1871), p. 332, with no mention of his children.
144Brad Hess, Haight, Prochnow and other families, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi? db=renegadepricer. It should be noted, however, that this account specifically makes Aureyanche/Harriet a daughter of William Allen by his wife Mary.
145We have to correct the statement in an earlier version of these notes that he was bapt. 25 Dec. 1688 at Flatbush. His parents really did have such a son baptized on that date, but as they baptized another son Jan exactly 8 years (to the day) later at Brooklyn, it is evident that the first child died, and that the latter baptism is the pertinent one. This family is treated, albeit quite sketchily, in Effie M. Smith, A genealogy of the Van Pelt family (Chicago, 1913), 62-63. See also Bergen, Kings County, 356, where however his marriage date is incorrectly given; Gerald J. Parsons, “Family Record of Aert Theunissen Lanen van Pelt,” NYGBR 87 (1956): 135-6, reprinted in Long Island Source Records, 562-3. Aert Theunissen Lanen van Pelt is stated to have been also of Millstone, N.J., in an undocumented account in the Somerset County Historical Quarterly, 6:46.
146“A list off [sic] all the inhabitants off [sic New Utrecht, both off whites and blacks, males and females,” in Lists of inhabitants of colonial New York, 242-43, at p. 242. This list has often been dated to 1738, but see NYGBR 123 (1992): 85-6.
147Bergen, Kings County, 356.
148The 1913 Van Pelt genealogy gives this marriage and correctly notes the cousinship of the partners, but does not trace their issue. See also Bergen, Kings County, p. 292. This family is treated in Van Tassel Sutphen, The Sutphen family (New York, 1927), which we have not seen. We have relied for some of our data on Kristin Robinson, Peachey Pages, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=peachey2.
149“Some ‘Old Stone House’ papers of the eighteenth century, from original manuscripts” [ed. A. Van Doren Honeyman], pt. 1, Somerset County Historical Quarterly 6 (1917): 35-38, at pp. 35, 38.
150A. Van Doren Honeyman, “The Lane families of Somerset County and vicinity,” Somerset County Historical Quarterly, 2 (1913): 194-208, at p. 198, citing Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, p. 705.
151Andrew D. Mellick, Jr., The story of an old farm; or, Life in New Jersey in the eighteenth century (Somerville, N.J., 1889), pp. 263-4.
152A Van Doren Honeyman, “The Eoff family of Pluckemin,” Somerset County Historical Quarterly 7 (1918): 284-93, at p. 292; however this article seems to imply that his wife’s name was Mary Eoff, whereas it appears to have been Mary Allen, according to William Nelson, [New Jersey] Marriage Records, 1665-1800(1900): 364, which gives the date of the licence as 10 Sept. 1778.
153Mellick, op. cit., p. 577.
154See the memoir of a grandson, Henry R. Sutphen, a marine engineer and shipbuilder, in National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 46:378-79; this man is also treated briefly in Who Was Who in America, vol. 3.
155See the memoir of a grandson, Arthur Potter Sutphen, in Somerset County Historical Quarterly, 1 (1912): 75-6.
156The record, which is in given in MDC:196, supplies nothing more than their names and the date, save to state that the marriage was by licence; but no such document appears to be on file, or at least it is not listed in New York marriages previous to 1784: a reprint of the original edition of 1860 with additions and corrections … (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1984).
157Effie M. Smith, A genealogy of the Van Pelt family (Chicago, 1913), 226-27. Aside from the geographical improbability of this claim, and the fact that it would make Catharina more than three years older than her husband, it is somewhat unnerving that the date of “birth” of Nicholas Quackenbos’ wife is given as 9 May 1731 [the true date for our Catharina] on p. 62 (where she is listed with her parents), but as 30 April 1738 on p. 226 (where she appears with her husband as the head of a family), a serious and inexplicable discrepancy which raises immediate doubts as to whether the same woman is referred to in both cases. Furthermore, the date of death of Nicholas Quackenbos’ wife is given as 9 Feb. 1813, which is suspiciously close (especially when it is offered without comment) to his own date of death of 19 Feb. 1813 as given in the 1909 Quackenbush genealogy, and confirms the impression of carelessness which characterizes Smith’s work. We are further alarmed by the fact that this couple had seven children baptized in the New York Dutch Church (BDC II: 235, 248, 275, 304, 312, 321, 346), yet none of the sponsors had any discernable connection with the present branch of the Van Pelt family.
158An account of the wife of Nicholas Quackenbos which is somewhat more satisfactory that Smith’s is given in Adriana (Quackenbush) Suydam, The Quackenbush family in Holland and America (Paterson, New Jersey, 1909), 92, where she is called “Catherina, daughter of Johannes Van Pelt”; but no source is cited for her father’s name, no commitment is made as to her date of birth, and though it is stated that she “died in 1775” (the year of birth of her last child), no age at death is given. The true identity of Nicholas Quackenbos’s wife is revealed as follows: On 14 March 1731, Jan Van Pelt and his wife Hillegond Boekenhoven baptized a child in the New York Dutch Church, the sponsors being “Johannes Poel and his mother Tietje Van Pelt” (BDC II:11). On 16 Feb. 1735 they baptized a daughter Catharina (BDC II:40). On 20 Nov. 1737 they baptized another child, and the sponsors were “Johannes Poel and his wife Sara Wilkesse.” (BDC II:61). So when, on 21 Jan. 1761, we again find “Johannes Poel and his wife Sara Wilkesse” serving as baptismal sponsors, this time for Jan, son of “Nicholaas Kwakkenbosch and Catharina Van Pelt” (BDC II:248) so clearly the mother in this case was Catharina Van Pelt, bapt. 16 Feb. 1735, daughter of Jan Van Pelt and Hillegond Boekenhoven. Further research has established that Johannes Poel was himself bapt. 22 Jan. 1692 (BCD:212), the only known child of Johannes Van Poel and his wife Tietje/Titje Andries, who had been married 11 March 1692 (MDC:72). His mother (who is occasionally called Fitje, at least in the published versions of the records) subsequently married Hendrick van Pelt, and became the mother of Jan Van Pelt, bapt. 15 Aug. 1705 (BDC:310), who married Hillegond Boekenhoven. In other words, Johannes Poel (the younger) was uterine half-brother of Jan Van Pelt, to whose child and grandchild he successively stood as a baptismal sponsor. This is all proven by the 1716 will (WNYHS 2:248) of Tietje’s mother, Weiske/Niesje Wytes or Huytes, who m. (1) Tietje’s father, Andries Andrieszen (MDC:20) and (2) Jan Vigné (MDC:50). This branch of the Van Pelt family is treated very sketchily in the 1913 Van Pelt genealogy, pp. 32-33, where it is falsely stated that Jan Van Pelt’s 1705 baptism occured on Staaten Island; the many deficiencies in this account are difficult to excuse considering that the requisite materials had been readily accessible in print for over a decade prior to the book’s publication.
159As previously noted, much of the evidence for her identity was brought to our attention by Lynn Dielman, of San Diego, California, a descendant of her daughter Adriaentje. Her complete list of known descendants of Garrit Blom and Judicke Hegeman may be viewed at her website, Forage in the Past, at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=lynnd.
     Subsequently, we discovered that an identification of “Judith (Hageman) Bloom” had been previously published, but without any discussion of the evidence, in Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Dutchess County…, III (1995), 2.
160There is a good account of this family in James Riker, Harlem … its early annals (New York, 1881), pp. 142-3 n., and a very bad one in Teunis G. Bergen, Kings County (New York, 1881), pp. 37-9. The 1726 will of Barent Blom (WNYHS 3:172), of Flushing, mentions his wife “Famettie Blom.” While Riker and Bergen give only her first name, she has been called a daughter of Gerrit Janse Snedeker (or Snediker) and Elsje Teunise Nyssen, of whom the latter’s family is treated in John Reynolds Totten, “Jan Cornelis Buys … Teunis Nyssen … Roelof Willemszen,” NYGBR 66 (1935): 225-37, where she is mentioned on p. 235. This identification is lent credence by the facts that Barent named a son Gerrit, and that two of his other children, Abraham (1703) and Isaac (1709), had Snedeker sponsors at their baptisms.
     Barent Blom had a close contemporary in the Barent Blom of Bedford, in Brooklyn, who made a will in 1756 without mentioning a wife, she being presumably deceased (WNHYS 5:118-19). Bergen, in his inimitable manner, gets the two testators completely confused (Kings County, p. 38). Riker and Bergen are probably correct in his stating that this other Barent was a son of Claes Barentse Blom and Elisabeth Paulus [Denkersen], for his will mentions a daughter Elizabeth and (unnoticed by Bergen) a son Nicholas (= Claes). Riker noted the coincidence that this man’s wife was also a Femmetje. We suspect they were the “Barent Blom and Femmetje Fardon his wife” who served as baptismal sponsors for a member of the Fardon Family in the New York Dutch Church on 30 Aug. 1727 (BDC 477), and the woman is further mentioned as “my daughter Femmittie, wife of Barent Bloom” in the 1740 will of “Jacob Fardon, of Scrallinburgh, in Bergen County, New Jersey, yeoman, being very ancient” (WNYHS 3:423-4). If the phraseology of the will is given credence the woman’s husband must then have still been alive, eliminating the testator of 1726 from consideration. This, and the fact that the testator of 1756 had a son named Jacob, support the proposed identification. Jacob Fardon (or Ferdon or Verdon) and his wife Femmetje Willems (NYM: 44), perhaps a Westervelt, are discussed by Bergen in King’s County, 112-13, and figure briefly in NYGBR 94 (1963): 39.
161She should be distinguished from the “Femmetje Bloem, j.d.” who m. 3 June 1748 “Jacob Snedecker, j.m.,” the marriage record (in the register of the Flatbush Dutch Church) stating that they were “both from New Lands [recte Lots?], and married there.” This would be a very late first marriage for the present woman, and would more plausibly relate to the daughter Femmetje named in the 1756 will of Barent Blom of Bedford.
162WNYHS 3:172.
163WNYHS 6:63-4.
164See Teunis G. Bergen, The Bergen Family, 1st (New York, 1866), pp. 63 ff.; greatly expanded in the 2nd ed. (Albany, 1876), pp. 142-143 (which contains an incorrect suggestion as to the parentage of Marritje, wife of Theunis Bergen), 153-4 ff.; Barbara A. Barth, “The family of Dirck Janszen Woertman of Brooklyn Ferry,” pt. 1, NYGBR 132 (2001): 137-46, at pp. 141-42; pt. 2, NYGBR 133 (2002): 137-46, at p. 138, where the identity of Marritje Woertman, wife of Theunis Bergen, is established. He must be distinguished from a Dirck Bergen, of Brooklyn, who made a will in 1759 mentioning wife Deborah (WNHYS 5:385), and who would appear on onomastic grounds to have been the Dirk Bergen bapt. 5 March 1718 in the New York Dutch Church, son of Hans Bergen and Rachel Bensen, and mentioned as the minor son “Derick Bergen” in the 1731 will of Hans Bergen, of Brooklyn (WNYHS 3:62-3). He is accepted as such in The Bergen Family, 2nd ed. (1876), pp. 228-30.
165WNYHS 5:102-3.
166Bergen, The Bergen Family, 2nd ed. (1876), pp. 153-5.
167See Frank J. Doherty, “The Burtis Family,” in Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Dutchess County…, III (1995), 1-14, at pp. 2-5.
168LDS Ancestral File, not checked against original record
169Fl.Fr. 3:63.
170Bergen, The Bergen Family, 2nd (1876), pp. 286-7, citing Lib. 34, p. 421, con., King’s county register’s office.
171See Walter Kenneth Griffin, “The Dutcher Family …,” pt. 3, NYGBR 41 (1910): 44-54, at p. 47.
172NYM 164.
173NYM 164, where his bride is called “Catharine Bush.”
174John Griffin Wood, “The Ter Bos Family,” MS in the New York Public Library, written prior to 1939; this reference was kindly brought to our attention by Tom Terbush. This connection is also noted in Thorn Dickinson, “Early history of the Thorne family of Long Island,” pt. 6, NYGBR 93 (1962): 85-97, at p. 95 (repr. in Genealogies of Long Island Families, 2:193-205).
175Records of Crum Elbow Precinct, 22, 23, 24, 29.
176NYGBR 69 (1938): 80, 81.
177See the transcription in J. Wilson Poucher & Helen Wilkinson Reynolds, Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, New York (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical Society, II, 1924), p. 238.
178Wallace McLeod, The family of Richard Vanderburgh of Richmond Hill (1797-1869) ([Toronto], 1962), 4 (where however his wife’s surname is misprinted “Tabor”).
179Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct, p. 27.
180NYGBR 7 (1876):46.
181The querist just quoted, who calls her husband a judge, assigns Hannah an impossible birthdate of 1783, which a respondent suggested might instead have been her marriage date (NYGBR 26:93).
182The best account of this family would appear to be Katherine Mimmack, Biographical Sketches of the Bailey-Myer-Mason Families (1908), which reproduces a portrait of William Bailey facing p. 18. On Col. John Bailey (1732-1806) see Eugene Augustus Hoffman, Genealogy of the Hoffman family: descendants of Martin Hoffman, with biographical notes (New York, 1899), 207. John Bailey is called “the first man to hoist the revolutionary flag in New York,” in the memoir of William’s son Theodorus in The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, vol. 1 (1904).
183These other children included Phoebe, wife of Sidney Smith (10,000 Vital Records, no. 8066), William Bailey, Jr., who d. young and unmarried (Ibid., no. 392), and John Bailey, a great-grandfather of the literary critic Van Wyck Brooks, according to James Hoopes, Van Wyck Brooks (1977), 3.
184Reuben H. Walworth, Hyde genealogy, or, The descendants, in the female as well as in the male lines, from William Hyde, of Norwich, 2 vols. (1864), 1: 530-32.
185Mimmack, Biographical Sketches of the Bailey-Myer-Mason Families, 17ff.
18610,000 Vital Records of Eastern New York, 1777-1834, ed. Bowman, entry no. 6167.
187Biographies of Myers will be found in Benson John Lossing, The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812; or, Illustrations, by pen and pencil, of the history, biography, scenery, relics, and traditions of the last war for American independence (1896), 654n, and in Mimmack, Biographical Sketches of the Bailey-Myer-Mason Families, 9ff.
188Mimmack, Biographical Sketches of the Bailey-Myer-Mason Families, 22.
189There are two separate entries for this man in a published roster of members of what would later be known as the Sons of the American Revolution, Year book of the societies composed of descendants of the men of the Revolution, 1890, pp. 293, 330. In the first he is called “Great great grandson of John Bailey, Lieut.-Colonel of Minutemen, Dutchess County, N.Y. Also, great great great grandson [sic] of Isaac Hegeman, Captain in the Second Militia, Dutchess County, N. Y. Also, great great great grandson of John Mason, Captain in the Massachusetts Militia.” In the second he is called “Great great grandson of Lieut.-Col. John Bailey, Duchess County (N. Y.), Regiment of Minutemen. Also, great great grandson of Capt. John Mason, Massachusetts Militia. Also, great great grandson of Capt. Isaac Hegeman, Second Regiment, New York.” The first entry should have read “great great grandson [sic] of Isaac Hegeman.”
190The account of them in Whitehead Cornell Duyckinck and the Rev. John Cornell, Duyckinck and Allied Families (New York, 1908), 177, is not very accurate, calling her Kate Bailey Mears.
191Reuben H. Walworth, Hyde genealogy, or, The descendants, in the female as well as in the male lines, from William Hyde, of Norwich, 2 vols. (1864), 1: 535.
192Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, p. 56.
193According to W.K. Griffin in NYGBR 41:48; we have not seen the original record.
194Dutchess County Wills, Liber B, pp. 6-7 [FHL 913,660]; abstracted given in Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: estates, no. 108, p. 222, where the date is given as 23 Aug. 1793. In Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Dutchess County…, III (1995), p. 617, the date of this will is incorrectly given as 23 Aug. 1795.
195Francis Filkin’s account-book (1911), p. 101; this extract was previously published in NYGBR 34:111.
196This daughter of Abraham De Graef and Elizabeth Parmentier is missed in Prentiss Glazier, Palmatier-Parmentier family, Dutchess County, N.Y. (typescript, 1976, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), p. 2.
197Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct, p. 27.
198Francis Filkin’s account-book, p. 6.
199Old Miscellaneous Records of Dutchess County, p. 193.
200NYGBR 26:93, no reference given.
201Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: deeds, no. 352, p. 111, which also mentions “a deed given by Isaac Hagaman and Nelly, his wife, to George Meddagh.” Gideon Verveelen’s will (WNYHS VI, 292-4; Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: estates, no. 252, p. 239) itemizes a number of sales of his land, and though it does not mention Isaac Hegeman it does list a sale to Aert Middah.
202“A Return made August 15th, 1775, at the house of Jacob Griffin, of persons who signed the Association,” printed in Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County, 481-5, at p. 483.
203Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County, 480; Documents relative to the colonial history of the State of New York, 15:279.
204NYGBR 84:219, without source citation. Similar, and perhaps identical, petitions to the one seen by Jones are printed in the Bureau of Archives for the Province of Ontario, 2nd Report (1904), 635-6, and in Coldham, op. cit., 218-19.
205Minutes of the Committee and of the first Commission for detecting and defeating conspiracies in the state of New York, December 11, 1776 – September 23, 1778, with collateral documents; to which is added Minutes of the Council of appointment, state of New York, April 2, 1778 – May 3, 1779. (1924), 270-72; capitalization and punctuation altered for clarity. This record was kindly brought to our attention by a descendant, Prof. John McLeod.
206Minutes of the Committee and of the first Commission for detecting and defeating conspiracies in the state of New York, December 11, 1776 – September 23, 1778, with collateral documents; to which is added Minutes of the Council of appointment, state of New York, April 2, 1778 – May 3, 1779. (1924), 294-95; capitalization and punctuation altered for clarity.
207Minutes of the Committee and of the first Commission for detecting and defeating conspiracies in the state of New York…, p. 309.
208Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: deeds, no. 352, p. 111.
209Despite the undocumented statement (which we only saw after writing these lines) in Prentiss Glazier, “LeRoy Family (Dutchess Co., N.Y.),” typescript in the collection of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, 1974, p. 9. The fact that her second son was named Henry, and she had no son named Isaac, also tells against Glazier’s theory.
210Worden’s edition of the register, p. 15, gives the mother’s surname as “Freer,” but it is “de Graav” in the Adriance Memorial Library transcript.
211NYGBR 41:47.
212Francis Filkin’s account-book, p. 98.
213Helen Wilkinson Reynolds, “Francis Filkin’s Book: A key to part of its contents,” Year Book [of the] Dutchess County Historical Society, 23 (1938): 52-71, at p. 61.
214Fernow Wills, no. 777, which gives the impression in this instance of being a more careful abstract than that in WNYHS 4:203-4.
215His parents were married 18 Oct. 1702 at Kingston; see Prentiss Glazier, Palmatier-Parmentier family, Dutchess County, N.Y. (Typescript, 1976, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), p. 3. For the early generations of this family see also Bergen, p. 221, and Riker, Revised History of Harlem, 447, n.. Since the present notes were prepared, there has appeared a thorough study of this family by Bruce A. Bennett, entitled “Pierre1 Parmentier of New Amsterdam and Some of His Decendants,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 138 (2007): 85-96, 199-208, ending at the generation of Michiel Parmentier, in which he at p. 201.
216In Kathlyne Knickerbocker Viele, Viele, 1659-1909: two hundred and fifty years with a Dutch family of New York (New York, 1909), 49-50, an undistinguished production, records probably relating to this man are indescriminately mingled with those of a Cornelis Viele (d. 1782-83) of Kingston, whose will is abstracted in WNYHS 12:83-4.
217Cornelius is completely overlooked in the account of his parents, Pieter Viele and Hanna Myndertse van den Bogaard, given in Kathlyne Knickerbocker Viele, Viele, 1659-1909: two hundred and fifty years with a Dutch family of New York (New York, 1909), pp. 67-68, where it is stated that they were married 17 March 1704, but the marriage is not recorded at Albany or at Kingston. The Kingston register records them as the parents of a daughter Jannetjen, said to have been “baptized in Pakeepsy” on 8 Feb. 1716 (Kingston baptisms, no. 2377).
218Palmatier-Parmentier family, Dutchess County, N.Y. (Typescript, 1976, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), p. 3.
219Theresa Gaskell, Parmentiers, available online at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=theresagaskell.
220Details of this bible record, and a scan of it, were kindly communicated by Mrs. Muriel (Albright) Frincke, who descends from two of their daughters, Helena and Sisley, “thus making my grandparents third cousins as grandfather came from one sister and grandmother from the other.”
221Prentiss Glazier, Van de Bogart family of Dutchess County, N.Y. (Typescript, 1974, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), p. 9 but his discussion of the evidence is so vague that his work would have to be entirely reconstructed before it could be accepted.
     In an earlier version of these notes, we suggested that she might instead have married her first cousin once removed, Damon Palmontier, bapt. 21 Nov. 1722 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, son of Michiel Parmentier and Maria Titsoort, and grandson of Michiel Palmentier and Neeltje Janse Damen. However, such a possibility seems to be ruled out by the work of Bruce A. Bennett referred to above.
222George Austin Morris, “The Freer family of New Paltz, N.Y.,” pt. 5, NYGBR 34 (1903): 273-77, at p. 274.
223Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), 14, 34 (for their children), 66 (for their grandchildren).
224Prentiss Glazier, Van Kleeck family of Dutchess County, New York (Typescript, 1974, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), p. 6.
225Edwin Brockholst Livingston, The Livingstons of Livingston Manor; being the history of that branch of the Scottish House of Callendar which settled in the English province of New York during the reign of Charles the Second, and also including an account of Robert Livingston of Albany, “the nephew,” a settler in the same province, and his principal descendants (New York: The Knickerbocker Press, 1910).
226See the account of the Bartlett family in Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent…, 2:400 ff., at pp. 409-10.
227Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), p. 40.
228James Romans, “Romans-Petty-Martin_McGohanMann-Swarts-Ryan_Millward,” formerly at http://www.my-ged.com/romans/.
229Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 2:403.
230Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 2:403.
231Marcia Seeber Alary, Seeber Home Page, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Prairie/7191/dav00008.htm; Carolyn Proffitt Winch, Thomas Esmay, available online at http://www.rootsweb.com/~gumby/cgi-bin/igmget.cgi/n=Winch?I00729.
232Jonathan Pearson, Contributions for the Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany, from 1630 to 1800 (Albany, 1872); we have had access only to the version reprinted in Joel Munsell (ed.), Collections on the history of Albany, from its discovery to the present time…, 4 vols. (Albany, 1871), vol. IV, at p. 184o. This account is followed in Kathlyne Knickerbocker Viele, Viele, 1659-1909: two hundred and fifty years with a Dutch family of New York (New York, 1909), 124, where Simeon is included in a list of “Unplaced Vieles.”
233Year book of the Holland Society of New York, 1922-1923, p. 50
234Year book of the Holland Society of New York, 1922-1923, p. 71.
235Parmentier genealogy, p. 6. In Kathlyne Knickerbocker Viele, Viele, 1659-1909: two hundred and fifty years with a Dutch family of New York (New York, 1909), p. 71, the Myndert Viele who m. Rebecca Parmentier is shown as having married previously Elizabeth Douw, and also to have been identical with the “Myndert Vielie, farmer, of Beekmans Precinct, Dutchess County” whose will, dated 1 June 1785 and proved 9 April 1786, is abstracted in WNYHS 13:336-37. But this will makes no mention of a wife (who was presumably then dead), and no proper evidence for this three-way correspondence is offered.
     From a comparison with other passages in her work, it would appear that K.K. Viele’s claim regarding the supposed first marriage is taken from an entry in Jonathan Pearson, Contributions for the Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany, from 1630 to 1800 (Albany, 1872), reading: “VIELE [probably Veeder], Myndert, and Elisabeth …. Ch: Volkert, bp. Oct. 3, 1736.” It is not clear why she ignored Pearson’s suggested correction (in square brackets in the original), but on the preceding page, 184n, Myndert Veeder and wife Elizabeth Douw are shown with seven other children spanning this time period, and Volkert would fit perfectly in the sequence of their children. It may be noted that no son Volkert is named in the 1786 will of “Myndert Vielie.”
236From a list of marriages performed by Francis Filkin, recorded in his Account Book, p. 101.
237This is a difficult question, because there are no baptisms for any children of this couple in the register of the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church between 1740 and 1745, after which there is a gap of nearly 20 years. But if this identification is true, then these Mynderts (father and son) must both be distinguished from the “Myndert Vielie, farmer, of Beekmans Precinct, Dutchess County,” mentioned above, whose will, abstracted in WNYHS 13:336-37, shows no son Myndert.
238Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), 64, 33 (for his parents), 118 (for their children).
239Kenneth E. Hasbrouck, The Hasbrouck Family in America (New Paltz, N.Y.: privately published, 1961), p. 89.
240Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, p. 237.
241Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), 35 (where however he is called Simon, in disagreement with contemporary records), 68 (for his children), 122-23 (for his grandchildren). His parents figure in NYGBR 35 (1904): 274, but he is not shown. Jacobus Freer was a son of Simon Freer and Marritje van Bommel, aforesaid.
242Eighteenth century records of … Rombout Precinct and the original Town of Fishkill, deeds, no. 284, p. 98.
243According to The Clampett Genealogy, available online at http://www.clampett.net/centre/genealogy/index_genealogy.htm. Emeline and Mary Ann, who are listed in the 1968 Freer genealogy, p. 68, were baptized at Poughkeepsie.
244Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), 68.
245Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), 68, 123; Peter Freer Whitney (1817-1885), available online at http://wiki.whitneygen.org/wrg/index.php/ Family:Whitney,_Peter_Freer_(1817-1885). The sisters Catharina and Sara Trumpbour appear in William J. Hoffman, “Notes on old Dutch-American Families — The First Four Generations of the Palatine Trumpbour Family of Ulster County, New York,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 63 (1932): 222-43, at pp. 240-41, but the account does not include their husbands or children.
246See also Prentiss Glazier’s Van Kleeck family of Dutchess County, New York (Typescript, 1974, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), p. 11.
247Driggs, no. 63 (misnumbered 93 in his own account), with erroneous identification of his grandfather.
248Barbara A. Barth, “The family of Dirck Janszen Woertman of Brooklyn Ferry,” pt. 2, NYGBR 133 (2002): 137-46, at p. 138, on which we have drawn heavily in our account of this family.
249WNYHS 5:102-3. The account of Jannetje Bergen in Teunis G. Bergen, The Bergen Family, 2nd ed. (1876), p. 153, assigns her as children the three daughters mentioned in her own father’s will (!), an error which has also been noticed in footnote 4 of Robert Scott Shaw, “A Sketch of Peter Van Camp (1721-1783),” Annals of Genealogical Research, vol. 1, no. 1 (2005), an e-journal available online at http://www.genlit.org/agr/viewarticle.php?id=2. We are grateful to Margaret (Hagerman) Hunter for pointing out that Jannetje was a Bergen, an identification we had missed in earlier versions of these notes.
250Records of Crum Elbow Precinct, Dutchess County, New York, 1738-1761…, ed. Franklin D. Roosevelt (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical Society, VII, 1940), 24, and information from Dorothy A. Koenig, via Margaret (Hagerman) Hunter.
251Information from Dorothy A. Koenig, via Margaret (Hagerman) Hunter.
252“Signers in Beekmans Precinct, Duchess [sic] County, July, 1775,” in Philip H. Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County from 1609 to 1876, inclusive (Pawling, N.Y.: 1877), 485-87, at p. 487.
253See Margaret (Hagerman) Hunter, Descendants of John Hagerman (UE). In Loyalists lineages of Canada, 1783-1983, published by the Toronto Branch, The United Empire Loyalists’ of Canada (Agincourt, Ontario, 1984), 276-7, he is made the father of the Tunis Hagerman whom we postulate as his younger (half-)brother, and his birthdate stated, without any qualification, as 1725, and his wife’s as 1730. We suspect these dates are baseless, and they certainly do not accord well with the birthdates of this couple’s younger children, who were born in the 1780s.
    Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 6:346, followed by the late Barbara A. Barth, “The family of Dirck Janszen Woertman of Brooklyn Ferry,” pt. 2, NYGBR 133 (2002): 137-46, at p. 138, states that John Hegeman, son of John Hegeman, Jr., and Sara van der Vliet, m. 18 June 1765 at Poughkeepsie, Maritje Masten, and d. 29 Dec. 1811, possibly at Clinton, New York. However, we believe there are compelling reasons for placing the husband of Maria Masten in the family of Hendrick4 (Joseph3, Hendrick2, Adriaen1) Hegeman (no. 12 below) and Geertruy Barentse. We also addressed this question in a response to Barth’s article, published in NYGBR 133 (2002): 292-93, and our conclusions were accepted by the editor and to the best of our knowledge have not been challenged.
254“Rombout Precinct Loyalists,” NYGBR 112 (1981):14, citing for the record of 1775, Calendar of New York Historical Manuscripts: Revolutionary Papers, 2 vols. (Albany, 1868).
255We have not personally examined all the available source materials relating to this man, but “John Hagerman of Elizabeth Town” appears in the so-called “Old United Empire Loyalists List” printed in The Centennial of the settlement of the United Empire Loyalists, 1784-1884… (Toronto, 1885), p. 186.
256Cornelius Hegeman is mentioned under the account of his wife in George Olin Zabriskie, “The Wiltsie Family of early New York,” pt. 4, NYGBR 107 (1976): 81-90, at p. 86, but no son John is proposed for him there, and his ancestry is not given; it is however clear on onomastic and other gounds that he was the son Cornelius named in the 1762 will of Adriaen Hegeman, of Brooklyn Ferry (WNYHS 6:171).
257Esther Wright Clark, The Loyalists of New Brunswick (Ottawa, 1955), p. 288.
258see Margaret (Hagerman) Hunter, Descendants of Tunis Hagerman. Barbara A. Barth agrees that he was probably a son of this John Hegeman. As noted above, in Loyalists lineages of Canada, 1783-1983, 276-7, he is made a son of John Hagerman and Phoebe Ferguson, which seems incorrect.
259Mary Beacock Fryer &. William A. Smy, Rolls of the Provincial (Loyalist) Corps, Canadian Command, American Period (Toronto: Dundurn Press, 1981), p. 90 (inf. Margaret Hunter; not personally seen by us).
260We have not personally examined all the available source materials relating to this man, but “Tunis Hagerman of Ernest Town, soldier [in the] Loyal Rangers” appears in the so-called “Old United Empire Loyalists List” printed in The Centennial of the settlement of the United Empire Loyalists, 1784-1884… (Toronto, 1885), p. 187, showing that he was granted land by the Land Board at Adolphustown.
261Information from Pat Greenwell, a descendant of their son Edward.
262Driggs, no. 65 (originally misnumbered 95 in his own account), with erroneous identification of his grandfather.
263WNYHS 4:484.
264Her name is given as Geertie ____ (no maiden surname stated) in the baptismal record of his son Joseph (1740), and as “Geertruy Baarent” in that of their son Hendrick (1742).
265Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: estates, no. 240, p. 237.
266The author of the Adriance Memorial Library transcript of the register recognized that “____ Hegeman” must be Hendrick, and added a note to that effect. In Worden’s transcript of the register, p. 47, this entry is incorrect, the bride’s surname being given as “Parmentier.”
267NYGBR 40:252-3.
268Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, p. 219, giving her age as “79 or 59.” The copy of this work used for the Photoduplication Program of the NEHGS has the “79” stroked out in pen by some unknown hand, but this would appear to be a mistake.
269“Signers in Poughkeepsie, Duchess County, June and July, 1775,” printed in Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County, 487-9, at p. 487.
270Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 6:346, followed by Barbara A. Barth, “The family of Dirck Janszen Woertman of Brooklyn Ferry,” pt. 2, NYGBR 133 (2002): 137-46, at p. 138, makes the John Hegeman who m. Maria Masten a son of John Hegeman, Jr. (no. 11 above), and Sara van der Vliet. However, in the absence of direct evidence in the matter, we feel the identification presented here is more natural, suggesting that John named his son Denie for his step-father.
271Silvanus J. Macy, Genealogy of the Macy family from 1635-1868 (Albany, 1868), pp. 358-9, which does not provide any dates for Mary Hegeman or Zachariah van Wagenen. The latter was a son of John van Wagenen (1744-1823) and his wife Sarah Flagler (1751-1825), daughter of Zacharias Flagler (see under our no. 4.vi) by his second wife, Sarah Barton; see Harry Tallmadge Briggs & John Greene Briggs, The Colonial Ancestry of the Family of John Greene Briggs and Isabell Gibbs de Groff [1940?], p. 96.
272Federal Census of New York, microfilm series M32, reel 21, p. 116 (reference from an index).
273NYGBR 41:47.
274See Thorn Dickinson, “Early History of the Thorne Family of Long Island,” pt. 13, NYGBR 95 (1964): 33-39, at p. 272.
275Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct, p. 27.
276“A Return made August 15th, 1775, at the house of Jacob Griffin, of persons who signed the Association,” printed in Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County, 481-85, at p. 484.
277Documents relative to the colonial history of the State of New York, 15: 386.
27810,000 Vital Records of Eastern New York, 1777-1834, no. 4237.
279Eugene Augustus Hoffman, Genealogy of the Hoffman family: descendants of Martin Hoffman, with biographical notes (New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1899), pp. 208, and for their descendants, 286-88, 391-92; this work is however not entirely accurate. Lieut.-Col. Robert Hoffman (1737-1795) is also mentioned in Margherita Arlina Hamm, Famous Families of New York, 1:175. He and his wife Sarah (ca. 1739-1795) are buried in the Poughkeepsie Dutch churchyard (Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, p. 240; 10,000 Vital Records of Eastern New York, 1777-1834, nos. 4236, 4239).
280as noticed in the 1899 Hoffman genealogy and by the editor of the Adriance Memorial Library transcript of the church register.
28110,000 Vital Records of Eastern New York, 1777-1834, no. 4224.
282And not “____ Martin, sister of his first wife,” as erroneously stated in the 1899 Hoffman genealogy.
283See Walter Kenneth Griffin, “The Dutcher Family to the Births of the 5th Generation…,” pt. 5, NYGBR, 41 (1910): 240-55, at pp. 252-3.
284Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: mortgages, no. 44, p. 134.
285Records of the Chancery Court, Province and State of New York, Guardianships, 1691-1815, abstracted by Dr. Kenneth Scott (Collections of the Holland Society of New York, 1971), 21.
286Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: mortgages, no. 133, p. 149.
287The date is from two slightly discrepant bible records transcribed by Wallace E. McLeod in “Vanderburgh-Leroy-Fulton Family Bible Records,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 93 (1962): 139-42 (from a copy kindly provided by Terry Wanamaker). Her stated age of 74 years at death must be exaggerated, as it would force her birth to antedate her parents’ marriage by at least a year, which is extremely unlikely. The Vanderburgh bible records are generally unreliable in the matter of ages at death and (as is so often the case with this type of record) tend to overstate the ages of the elderly. Had McLeod been less trusting in this matter, he would surely have inferred on onomastic grounds the identity of Neeltje’s parents, which he states as “not … determined.” Her husband, who was in reality aged only 84 years, 7 months at the time of his death, is stated in one of the bible records to have been aged 90 years.
288Wallace McLeod, The family of Richard Vanderburgh of Richmond Hill (1797-1869) ([Toronto], 1962), 6-9, 11-13, from which we draw heavily here; Prentiss Glazier, Van Kleeck family of Dutchess County, New York (Typescript, 1974, New York Genealogical & Biographical Society), citing the “ancient parchment” Van Kleeck chart. Wallace E. McLeod, “Vanderburgh-Leroy-Fulton Family Bible Records,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 93 (1962): 139-42, at p. 140, cites on him Howard A. Thomas, “Lucas Dircksen Vanderburgh of New Amsterdam and his son Dirck,” M.S., New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Library.
289Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: deeds, nos. 352 (p. 111), 423 (p. 124).
290This man, who is treated in pp. 8-9 of the 1962 Vanderburgh genealogy, married (as his first wife) a distant kinswoman of ours, Cynthia (Bogaert) Rapalje, widow (and triple third cousin once removed) of Abraham Rapalje.
291G. Elmore Reaman, A history of Vaughan Township (Toronto, 1971), 272.
292History of Toronto and [the] County of York, Ontario, 2 vols. (Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1885), I, pt. ii, p. 171.
293Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, ed. Thomas B. Wilson (Lamberville, N.J., 1985), 28-29. He made his will on 7 March 1800, and apparently never revised it.
294Clinton Women’s Institute, History of Clinton and Surrounding Community (Clinton, Ontario, 1950), p. 3.
295History of Clinton, available online at http://web.archive.org/web/20021004072828/ http://www.town.clinton.on.ca/history.htm.
296Wallace E. McLeod, “Vanderburgh-Fulton Family Bible Records,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 93 (1962): 139-41, at p. 139.
297The record, which we have not seen, is quoted by Wallace E. McLeod in “Vanderburgh-Fulton Family Bible Records,” at p. 139.
298Wallace E. McLeod, “Vanderburgh-Leroy-Fulton Family Bible Records,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 93 (1962): 139-42, citing, for the LeRoy descent, NYGBR 64 (1933): 41-5, which we have not seen.
299Prentiss Glazier, LeRoy family of Dutchess County, New York, typescript at the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, 12, 13, with further detail on the said John LeRoy, Jr., at p. 2.
300Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, ed. Thomas B. Wilson (Lamberville, N.J., 1985), 28-29.
301 William D. Reid, The Loyalists in Ontario: The Sons and Daughters of the American Loyalists of Upper Canada (Lambertville, N.J., 1973), 304. Daniel Soules’ land grant is mentioned in History of Toronto and [the] County of York, Ontario, 2 vols. (Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1885), I, pt. ii, p. 125; the Rev. G.T. Ridlon, Sr., The Soules Family In Canada (1926), available online at http://ca.geocities.com/billwarnica/page53.html. Her father was, incidentally, descended from the Howland family.
302Edith G. Firth (ed.), The Town of York, 1793-1815: a collection of documents of early Toronto (Publications of the Champlain Society — Ontario Series, V, 1962), 297.
303Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, ed. Thomas B. Wilson (Lamberville, N.J., 1985), 33.
304for this last see Bill Warnica, Soules Family History, at http://ca.geocities.com/billwarnica/page12.html.
305G. Elmore Reaman, A history of Vaughan Township (Toronto, 1971), 117; Markham, 1793-1900, ed. Isabel Champion (Markham, Ontario: Markham Historical Society, 1979), p. 284 (referred to only as “Vanderburg” in the text, but identified as “Barnabas Vanderburg” in the index).
306Robert Stamp, Early Days in Richmond Hill (The Richmond Hill Public Library Board, 1991), available online at http://edrh.rhpl.richmondhill.on.ca/search.asp.
307This was perhaps Eliabeth (Drummond) Dillon, wife of Christopher Dillon,, mentioned in History of Toronto and [the] County of York, Ontario, 2 vols. (Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1885), 2:252.
308Ontario Register, 2:225.
309We are grateful to a descendant, Terilee Craig, for information on this family.
310Information from Terilee Craig.
311History of Toronto and [the] County of York, Ontario, 2 vols. (Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1885), I, pt. ii, p. 79.
312Henry Scadding, Toronto of Old (Toronto, 1873), 440-1.
313Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, p. 7.
314We have not found a contemporary source for this statement, but it is mentioned in The Silverthorn Family (unsigned), at http://www.peel.edu.on.ca/~cherryhill/Profpixel/ Silvethornfamily.html.
315Edith G. Firth, ed., The Town of York, 1793-1815: A Collection of documents of early Toronto (Publications of the Champlain Society, Ontario Serives, V, 1962), 42 n.
316Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, p. 32. We are grateful to Terry Wanamaker for pointing out evidence of this marriage, which we had overlooked; she writes, “credit [for its discovery] should got to Libby Hancocks of Toronto.”
317 See also Carl, Ellen & Shannon Lambert, The Mighty Oak Home Page, at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~quick/.
318In a sketch of his son, Peter, in History of Toronto and [the] County of York, Ontario, 2 vols. (Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1885), 2:370, he is called “Richard Vanderbuigher [sic!] who was born in Markham Township.”
319History of Toronto and [the] County of York, Ontario, 2 vols. (Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1885), vol. II, p. 27; vol. I, pt. ii, p. 387; see also William D. Reid, The Loyalists in Ontario: The Sons and Daughters of the American Loyalists of Upper Canada (Lambertville, N.J., 1973), 121.
320Robert Stamp, Early Days in Richmond Hill (The Richmond Hill Public Library Board, 1991), available online at http://edrh.rhpl.richmondhill.on.ca/search.asp.
321Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, ed. Thomas B. Wilson (Lamberville, N.J., 1985), 32.
322The City of Toronto and the Home District commerical directory and register, with almanack and calendar for 1837, by George Walton (Toronto, 1836?), p. 109.
323G. Elmore Reaman, A history of Vaughan Township (Toronto, 1971), 37.
324See his web page at http://louisville.edu/history/faculty/mcleod/mcleod.html.
325A.J. Clark, “Rev. William Jenkins of Richmond Hill,” Ontario Historical Society Papers and Records 27 (1931): 15-76.
326William D. Reid, The Loyalists in Ontario: The Sons and Daughters of the American Loyalists of Upper Canada (Lambertville, N.J., 1973), 232.
327Marriage Bonds of Ontario, 1803-1834, ed. Thomas B. Wilson (Lamberville, N.J., 1985), 67.
328G. Elmore Reaman, A history of Vaughan Township (Toronto, 1971), 68.
329Reaman, A history of Vaughan Township, 179.
330A.J. Clark, “Rev. William Jenkins of Richmond Hill,” Ontario Historical Society Papers and Records 27 (1931): 15-76.
331Perhaps this man was a son or grandson of an older Gideon du Bois, one of the eight co-heirs of Matthias du Bois (will dated 2 May 1748) who quit-claimed part of his estate on 24 Jan. 1749 (Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: deeds, no. 66, p. 57). If so, he may also have been a brother of the Sarah du Bois who married Peter Harris (no. 3.i.a above).
332Eugene Augustus Hoffman, Genealogy of the Hoffman family: descendants of Martin Hoffman, with biographical notes (New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1899), p. 209.
333According to the NY Dutch Families web site, formerly at http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ranch/2697/ family/ wga26.html#I5599.
334Driggs, no. 371/384.
335“Tombstone inscriptions, Montgomery County, N.Y.,” pt. __ [including Old Cemetery at Hagaman], New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 62 (1931): 85-88, at p. 88.
336Eighteenth Century Records of … Rombout Precinct: estates, no. 240, p. 237.
337On her see “Early Settlers of Ulster Co., N.Y.: The Van Wagenen Family,” pt. 2, NYGBR 22 (1891): 151-4, at p. 154; Harry Tallmadge Briggs & John Greene Briggs, The Colonial Ancestry of the Family of John Greene Briggs and Isabell Gibbs de Groff [1940?], p. 96, which claims (although without citation of evidence) that Elizabeth van Wagenen d. “about 1770,” and explictly states that her widower “m. 2nd Blandina Pelts [sic].”
338WNYHS 8:77-78.
339D.A.R. Lineage Books, vol. 35, p. 11; vol. 59, p. 221.
340Briggs & Briggs, The Colonial Ancestry of the Family of John Greene Briggs and Isabell Gibbs de Groff [1940?], p. 96, as noted above.
341A memorandum of her marriage, performed by Francis Filkin, J.P., and recorded in his Account Book, p. 101, reads “desmer [i.e. dezember] 1742, dan Getrout Hendrick Pels met Jannatie Osterom.” The marriage of Jannetje Oosterom, who was bapt. 1 June 1725 in the Poughkeepsie Dutch Church, is missing from the account of the Ostrom family in Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 9:717-25 at p. 718.
342For them see NYGBR 40:252-3, which cites another case of the name Ostrom being incorrectly recorded as Osterhout.
343This is noted of the Van Wagenen brothers in NYGBR 22:154, and proven by their tombstones in the Presbyterian churchyard, Pleasant Valley (Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, p. 220). The First Presbyterian Church of Pleasant Valley was organized in 1765, according to Philip H. Smith, General History of Duchess [sic] County, 328. Unfortunately the records no longer survive before 1793; in the earliest of these the name Ostrom appears frequently, and there are many Ostroms buried in the churchyard.
344Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracuse, N.Y., 1892), 176, 180
345We are deeply grateful to Margaret Hunter for bringing the existence of this Hendrick Hegeman to our attention. She developed this theory of Hendrick’s parentage at least as far back as her message “Elizabeth Hagerman (1786-1873),” posted to the Hagerman Family Genealogy Forum on 31 March 2006; see http://genforum.genealogy.com/hagerman/messages/524.html. We are not aware that he has been mentioned in any published accounts of the family.
346Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman patent, 9:719.
347This date, along with the birthdates of her first and third Hegeman children, and of her second husband, and the date of her second marriage, are found in the Abel Gilbert family bible record, in the possession of Donald H. Gilbert, reproduced online at http://pages.total.net/~hunter/abegilbert.html. We are grateful to Margaret Hunter for bringing this item to our attention.
348Information from Margaret Hunter.
349See the account of this family in Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 9:717-25, at pp. 720ff. Roelof Oosterom, b. 1740, was a brother of Denys Oosterom, second husband of Geertje Barentse (whom see under no. 12 above). “Roeluf Ostrum” had licence dated 23 May 1761 to marry “Elisabeth Yelvington” (NYM:288), and they were subsequently m. 6 April following in the Rumbout Presbyterian Church. He was still at Poughkeepsie in 1764, when he baptized a child in the Presbyterian Church (NYGBR 69:82), and his removal to Schenectady is thus dated too early in Reynolds, who has his son John born there in 1763. This man was a Loyalist in the Revolution, and though he was still in New York on 22 June 1784, when he witnessed a will (WNYHS 13:56), he afterward took his younger children to Sidney Township, in Hastings County, Upper Canada; see William D. Reid, The Loyalists in Ontario (1973), p. 241; and Loyalist Lineages of Canada, I, 484-5. The account given of him in Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte (1904), 610-13, a typical mug-book, is not reliable, nor is that of his earlier ancestry in Cuyler Reynolds, Genealogical and family history of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley…, 3 vols. (New York, 1914), 1:504-5. Although his date of death and his age thereupon have been variously reported, there can be no doubt, on onomastic grounds, that he was the one bapt. 1740 at Poughkeepsie, son of Jan Oosterom and Blandina Relje aforesaid (see Griffin in NYGBR 40:253).
350Her father, Anthony Yelverton, was a Justice in Dutchess County in 1755 (WNYHS 5:82), but was of New Paltz Precinct, Ulster Co., at the making of his 1774 will, in which he mentions “my grandson Anthony Ostrom, son of my daughter Elizabeth” (WNYHS 12:401-2; Fernow Wills, no. 2152). His wife, Abigail, was a daughter of Andrew Gale, of Jamaica, Long Island, by the latter’s wife Mary ____; see John Insley Coddington, “Abel Gale of Jamaica, Long Island and some of his descendants,&rduqo; The American Genealogist 28 (1952): 13-23, 176-77 (correction by Paul W. Prindle), at pp. 18. 176. We are grateful to Roger Ostrom for directing us to this article.
351Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 372.
352Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 372, where an account of the Gilbert family is given.
353Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 371, where an account of the Gilbert family is given.
354Will of “Rulif Ostrom of the township of Sidney, County of Hastings, and Province of Upper Canada,” dated dated 25 March 1808, from a copy kindly supplied by Margaret Hunter.
355Canadian Christian Advocate, 20 Nov. 1847, p. 163; 21 Dec. 1847, pp. 175-176, quoted in Donald A. McKenzie, More Notices from Methodist Papers, 1830-1857 (Lambertville, N.J.: Hunterdon House, 1986), 251; with corection of an obvious misprint (“Rulif’ is printed as ”Ruhf”), and punctuation added for clarity. This notice was kindly brought to our attention by Margaret Hunter.
356Canadian Christian Advocate, 25 Dec. 1849, p. 7, quoted in Donald A. McKenzie, More Notices from Methodist Papers, 1830-1857 (Lambertville, N.J.: Hunterdon House, 1986), 251. This notice was kindly brought to our attention by Margaret Hunter.
357“Rev. Robert McDowall’s Register,” Ontario Historical Society Papers and Records, 1 (1899): 70-108, at p. 73; available online at http://my.tbaytel.net/bmartin/mcdowall.htm.
358William Canniff, History of the Province of Ontario (1872), p. 103.
3591852 census of Canada West, Hastings County, township no. 128 (Sidney), p. 32d, 33a, transcribed at http://automatedgenealogy.com/census52/SplitView.jsp?id=8491. The entry reads:
name            occupation   place of birth   religion         age sex
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Goldsmith, Stephen  Farmer    United States  Methodist Episcopa   72 M
Goldsmith, Elizabeth          United States  Methodist Episcopal  67 F
Goldsmith, Henry H. Farmer    Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  42 M
Goldsmith, Margaret           Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  36 F
Goldsmith, Elijah   Labourer  Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  23 M
Goldsmith, John     Labourer  Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  21 M
Davenport, Christeen  ----    Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  21 F
Goldsmith, Silvy An[n]        Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  13 F
Goldsmith, Caleb              Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  10 M
Goldsmith, Phebe              Canada West    Methodist Episcopal   7 F
Goldsmith, Peter L.           Canada West    Methodist Episcopal   5 M
Goldsmith, John     Farmer    Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  39 M
Goldsmith, Rances   Farmer    Canada         Methodist Episcopal  40 M
Goldsmith, Tabetha            Canada West    Methodist Episcopal  11 F
360Information from Margaret Hunter.
361Information from Margaret Hunter.
362Officers of the British forces in Canada during the War of 1812-15 (Welland, Ontario: Welland Tribune Print, 1908), pp. 59-60.
363The statutes of the province of Upper Canada; together with such British statutes, ordinances of Quebec, and proclamations, as relate to the said province (Kingston, Ontario, 1831), p. 579; Journal of the House of Assembly of Upper Canada, from the 7th January to the 16th March, 1831… being the first session of the eleventh provincial Parliament (York, Ontario: 1831), p. 71, col. 1; Statutes of Her Majesty’s province of Upper Canada, passed in the third session of the eleventh provincial Parliament of Upper Canada (York, 1833), p. 200; Statutes of Her Majesty’s province of Upper Canada, passed in the fourth session of the eleventh provincial Parliament of Upper Canada (Toronto, 1834), p. 264.
364Appendix to Journal of the House of Assembly of Upper Canada of the first session of the twelfth provincial Parliament (Toronto, 1835), p. 122.
365Journal of the Legislative Council of Upper Canada, first session of the twelfth provincial Parliament (Toronto, 1835), p. 15; Journal of the House of Assembly of Upper Canada, from the 15th day of January, to the 16th day of April 1835 (Toronto, 1835), p. 55; Journal of the House of Assembly of Upper Canada, from the twenty-seventh day of February, to the eleventh day of May, 1839 (Toronto, 1839), p. 40f.
366Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 431.
367“Rev. Robert McDowall’s Register,” Ontario Historical Society Papers and Records, 1 (1899): 70-108, available online at http://my.tbaytel.net/bmartin/mcdowall.htm.
3681852 census of Canada West, Hastings County, township no. 128 (Sidney), p. 32d, 33a, transcribed at http://automatedgenealogy.com/census52/SplitView.jsp?id=8491. The entry reads:
name            occupation   place of birth   religion         age sex
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Hagerman, Wm.        Farmer   Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   35 M
Hagerman, Gatrey              Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   38 F
Hagerman, Wm. H.              Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   10 M
Hagerman, John                Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist    5 M
Hagerman, Henry     Farmer    United States  Wesleyan Methodist   64 M
Hagerman, Tabetha             Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   62 F
Hagerman, Paul      Labourer  Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   22 M
Hagerman, Joseph    Labourer  Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   19 M
Hagerman, Lydia J.            Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   10 F
Vandervort, Ellen   Servant   Canada West    Wesleyan Methodist   14 F
369A fairly detailed record of this family, but largely lacking in dates, is given in Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 431-35.
370Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 282.
371Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 12.
372Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, pp. 346, 347.
373Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 346.
374Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 13.
375Johnson Family Tree, at http://awt.ancestry.ca/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=rickjnav.
376Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, p. 840.
377“Tombstone inscriptions, Montgomery County, N.Y.,” pt. __ [including Old Cemetery at Hagaman], New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 62 (1931): 85-88, at p. 88.
378Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 6:349.
379Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracuse, N.Y., 1892), 176-77.
380Marriage records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch church of Schenectady, N.Y., typescript (1917), unpaginated; available online at http://archive.org/details/marriagerecordso00firs.
381A photocopy of this letter, likewise in the possession of Roger Ostrom, was supplied by Candee Scofield Hoff.
382Membership record of Mrs. Annie Weed Candie Scofield, Lineage Book, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, vol. 8 (for 1895) (Washington, D. C., 1899), p. 17.
383William Richard Cutter, Genealogical and Family History of Western New York, 3 (?) vols. (New York, 1912), 1:176-79, at p. 177; punctuation revised for clarity.
384Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracue, 1892), ’Family Sketches” sketches following p. 450, pp. 261-62.
385Candee Scofield Hoff, “Willard Lyman Candee,” posting to the Kings [County, N.Y.] Family History & Genealogy Message Board, dated 13 Aug. 2012, at http://boards.ancestry.co.uk/ localities.northam.usa.states.newyork.counties.kings/ 1138.2.1.2.1.3/mb.ashx.
386Membership record of Miss Jane Evelina Scofield, Lineage Book, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, vol. 11 (for 1895) (Washington, D. C., 1900), pp. 123-24.
387Frank J. Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Dutchess County, New York: Paine to Rogers, at p. 118 (seen only in Google snippet view).
388Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracue, 1892), ’Family Sketches” sketches following p. 450, pp. 17-18.
389Cameron Richardson Family Tree, at http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/16934970/person/18019086829.
390Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracue, 1892), ’Family Sketches” sketches following p. 450, pp. 261-62.
391Schenectady Directory and City Register for the years 1841-42, available online at http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/citydirectories/1841/.
392George Olin Zabriskie, The Zabriskie family: a three hundred and one year history of the descendants of Albrecht Zaborowskij (ca. 1638-1711) of Bergen County, New Jersey, 2 vols. (1963), 2: 1121.
393“Tombstone inscriptions, Montgomery County, N.Y.,” pt. __ [including Old Cemetery at Hagaman], New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 62 (1931): 85-88, at p. 88.
394Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 9:721.
395“Tombstone inscriptions, Montgomery County, N.Y.,” as above, gives the reading of this stone as “Anthony Y. Osborn”, but there can be no doubt that this is the right persion.
396A designation accepted without citation of source in Settlers of the Beekman Patent, p. 721, where he is called “Henry A.” This statement appear to trace back to two D.A.R. applications, in which Anthony Yelverton Ostrom is is called “Henry [sic] Anthony Yelverton Ostrom (1755-1837),” and the chronologically impossible claim is made that he commanded a company in the New York Militia; see D.A.R. Lineage Books, vol. 35, p. 11 (Mrs. Rose Ostrom Van Patten); vol. 59, p. 221 (Mrs. Carmel Mercedes Ostrom Thomas). However, as he was obviously named for his maternal grandfather, there is no discernible reason why he should have been given the first name Henry, and the stated place of birth for him of Belleville, Upper Canada, is inconceivable. Roger Ostrom, to whom we are grateful for discussion of these points, surmises that Rose Van Patten confused her ancestor for her ancestor’s uncle, Henry Ostrom, a captain in the Albany Co. Militia in the Revolutionary War, and a son of Jan Ostrom Jr. and Blandina Relje.
397We are grateful to Roger Ostrom for pointing out this connection. This man is not to be confused with a doubtless older namesake who m. by New York licence dated 23 Dec. 1758 (NYM 476), Phoebe Youngs, daughter of Abimael Youngs, and as “Anthony Yelverton, gentleman, of Goshen, Orange County,” made a will dated 15 August 1774 (WNYHS 12:78) in which he names both his father-in-law and his own father John Yelverton (will in WNYHS 7:85).
398Information from Roger Ostrom.
399Montgomery County Wills, 1787-1922, vol. 6, p. 117 [FHL microfilm no. 506567]; from a transcription kindly supplied by Roger Ostrom.
400We are much indebted to Roger Ostrom for this account. The birthdates given in the family bible record agree exactly with those in baptimal records for Henry (1799), Daniel (1802), Diana (1805), Hester (1806), and Evert (1811). Additional information on the children comes from a typescript copies in his collection of a letter from Mrs. Ivy Douglas Ostrom of San Francisco, dated 26 Jan. 1899, to Mr. John A. Scott, and of a letter from Mrs. Ivy Douglas Ostrom to her “dear cousin” Mrs. Alice G. H. Black, dated 20 Feb. 1899. .
4011850 U.S. Federal Census, California, El Dorado, Weaverville and Vicinity, p. 261B; NARA roll no. M432_34; 1850 U.S. Federal Census, California, Sacramento, Sacramento, p. 189A, NARA roll M432_35. The entries read, respectively:
name              age   birthplace   occupation
-----------------------------------------------
Daniel G. Ostrom   48   New York     none
Sarah J. Ostrom    16   Upper Canada
Rebecca A. Ostrom  12        " *
Daniel A. Ostrom   14   Ohio
-----
* sic; but this is surely wrong


name               age   birthplace   occupation
------------------------------------------------
Daniel Y. Ostrom    48   New York     gardner
Sarah J. Ostrom     17   Canada
Daniel Ostrom  Jr.  14   Ohio
Rebecca Ostrom      12   Ohio
402John [Hedger], Daniel A. Ostrom, 1836-1906, posting to OSTROM-L Archives dated 27 Jan. 2007, at http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/OSTROM/2007-01/1169942256n. However, as pointed out in a reply by Roger Ostrom dated 29 Jan 2007 at http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/OSTROM/2007-01/1170135264, the marriage is there mistakenly assigned to this man’s son of the same name.
403Peter J. Delay, History of Yuba and Sutter Counties (Los Angeles, 1924), pp. 1191-92.
404The letter from Mrs. Ivy Douglas Ostrom dated 26 Jan. 1899 says here that Sarah Jane Ostrom “married Alonzo Hedger of Live Oak, Cal.” However, as pointed out by John Hedger in his previously-cited posting Daniel A. Ostrom, 1836-1906 on the OSTROM-L Archives, dated 27 Jan. 2007, “Sarah Jane Ostrom’s husband is [in fact] Lorenzo Dow Hedger and … they married in Sacramento (Live Oak did not exist until much later)…. [The writer] probably confused [the name of Sarah’s husband] … with the name of their son Francis Alonzo Hedger.”
405Peter J. Delay, History of Yuba and Sutter Counties, pp. 265, 264.
406Peter J. Delay, History of Yuba and Sutter Counties, pp. 1191-92; abbreviations expanded.
407Their daughter, Rose Ostrom, was the wife of W.M. van Patten, of Walla Walla, Washington. Mrs. Van Patten, mentioned above, writes in a short note entitled “Kirkpatrick–Gordon–Hageman–Ostrum,” Somerset County Historical Quarterly, 5 (1916): 317-19: “my line comes through Joseph Hageman who m. Elizabeth Van Wagenen; their daughter Sarah m. my ancestor Henry [sic] Ostrom.”
408Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 6:358.
409Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 6:358.
410Doherty, Settlers of the Beekman Patent, 6:358.
411Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracuse, N.Y., 1892), second section, pp. 64-65.
412Washington Frothingham, History of Montgomery County (Syracuse, N.Y., 1892), second section, pp. 64-65.
413R.D. Kolb, The Yoakum Family, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rdkolb.
414Prentiss Glazier, “LeRoy Family (Dutchess Co., N.Y.),” typescript in the collection of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, 1974, p. 9 (but as noted elsewhere we disagree with his identification of Sara Hegeman). For his mother see NYGBR 34:133. Ruth P. Heidgerd, The Freer family: The descendants of Hugo Freer, Patentee of New Paltz… (New Paltz, N.Y., 1968), 34, shows this man only as a child, and gives no marriage data for him.
415“Muster Roll at Gulliver’s Hole, S[t]. Mary’s Bay and Sissiboo, conducted between June 1st and June 6th 1784,” printed in A.W. Savary, Supplement to the History of the County of Annapolis [by W.A. Calnek] (toronto, 1913), 131-32, at p. 131.
416This list is printed, without citation or date, in Isaiah W. Wilson, A Geography and history of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia (Halifax, 1900), 75.
417Chuck LeRoy, LeRoy Genealogy, formerly at http://www.my-ged.com/db/page/leroy/3114. We have already mentioned our disagreement with Mr. LeRoy’s identification of Sara’s parents.
418Theresa Gaskell, Parmentiers, at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=theresagaskell.
419Cliff Miller, Reuben Hankinson, available online at http://web.archive.org/web/20010308062310/ http://www.bell-labs.com/user/cbm/genea/html/D0007/HI94.html.
420Lorenzo Sabine, Biographical Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution, with an historical essay, 2 vols. (Boston, 1864), 2:525; this statement is copied in Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, p. 345.
421Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War, as prepared by the State of New Jersey Adjutant General’s Office (1870), p. 617.
422E. Alfred Jones, The Loyalists of New Jersey: their memorials, petitions, claims, etc., from English records (Collections of the New Jersey Historical Society, X, 1927), 88-89. This passage originally appeared in Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, 11:3 (1926).
423Marion Gilroy, Loyalists and Land Settlement in Nova Scotia (Public Archives of Nova Scotia Publication no. 4, 1937).
424Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 123, 124.
425Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 227, 224.
426Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 133, 389-92, at p. 389; Abraham Hatfield, The Hatfields of Westchester: a genealogy of the descendants of Thomas Hatfield, of New Amsterdam and Mamaroneck, whose sons settled in White Plains, Westchester County, New York (New York, 1935), 69; Elaine Deion, The Hatfield Grant, available online at http://www.rootsweb.com/~canwgw/ns/digby/perm2/hatfield.htm.
427Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 152.
428Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 182.
429Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 152-53.
430See the landholders’ map in Illustrated Historical Atlas of the County of Elgin (Toronto, 1877), 14-15, which shows:
  • W.H. Hanksinon on the east quarter of the south half of lot 19, concession 2, and the south half of lot 20, concession 1.
  • Jno. [i.e. John] A. Hankinson on the north half of lot 20, concession 1.
  • E. Hankinson on the east part of the south three-quarters of lot 27, concession 2.
431We rely heavily on Theresa Gaskell, Parmentiers, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=theresagaskell.
432Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 137, 138.
433Theresa Gaskell, Parmentiers, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=theresagaskell.
434Charles A. Armour, “Colin Campbell,” Dictionary of Canadian Biography, 11:146-47.
435Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 138.
436Christian Messenger, 13 Sept. 1865.
437Gordon Alan Morris, The Sabin Family in North America, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gamorris.
438Gordon Alan Morris, The Sabin Family in North America, available online at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gamorris.
439From postings to the Freer Family Genealogy Forum and the UNITED-EMPIRE-LOYALIST-L Archives by Judy St. Eve Schor.
440Wilson, Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia, 138.
4411828 Militia Men of Malahide Township, Elgin County, Upper Canada, at http://www.elginogs.ca/Home/ancestor-indexes/military/1828-militia-rolls, reproduced from Men of Upper Canada, Militia Nominal Rolls, 1828-1829, ed. Bruce S. Elliott, Dan Walker and Fawne Stratford-Devai (Ontario Genealogical Society, 1995). This record states that he was born 6 June 1796 in Nova Scotia, which is only one day off that of 7 June 1796 which is (apparently) given for him in an old family record.
442Glazier, LeRoy family, p. 13, where however his calculated birthdate is incorrectly given as 1784 instead of 1785.

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From the Genealogy Page of John Blythe Dobson
URL = library.uwinnipeg.ca/people/Dobson/genealogy/ff/Hegeman-Hendrick.cfm
This page written 31 December 1999
Placed in an archival state 28 February 2013
Last revised 29 September 2013